Chapter
10 Section 4
Objectives
• Describe the culture of Native Americans in the
Southeast.
• Describe the conflict over land occupied by
Native Americans in the Southeast.
• Discuss the forced removal of Native Americans.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Terms and People
• Sequoyah – Cherokee leader and creator of the
Cherokee alphabet
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Set Questions:
1. List three Native American tribes that were
relocated by the United States Federal
Government.
2. Why did the US Government want the land?
3. How were the Cherokee’s different from other
Native American tribes?
4. What act gave Jackson the power to remove the
Native Americans?
See Pages 355-359 in your book
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Why did Jackson use force to remove
Indians from the Southeast?
Beginning with President Jefferson, there
had been attempts to move Native
Americans westward.
Jefferson hoped Native Americans would
move voluntarily to preserve their culture
(way of life).
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
After the War of 1812, Native Americans in the
“old” Northwest gave up their lands and moved
west of the Mississippi River.
However, the Native Americans living in the
Southeast refused to move.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
To government leaders, the tribes of the
Southeast stood in the way of westward
expansion.
tribes
American
settlement
Fertile farmland
By the 1820s, many southerners were demanding
that the government move the tribes by force.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
The pressure on Native Americans grew.
1825
President Monroe created a plan to move
all Native Americans west, but it failed.
1827
The state of Georgia forced the Creeks to
give up most of their land.
1828
Georgia tried to force the Cherokees to
give up their lands.
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Chapter
10 Section 4
Georgia’s actions were challenged in two Supreme
Court cases.
Cherokee Nation
v. Georgia
Worcester v.
Georgia
The Federal
Government could
not stop Georgia
from enforcing their
laws.
However, Georgia’s
laws “can have no
force” in Cherokee
territory.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
In Worcester v. Georgia, Chief Justice John
Marshall quoted treaties signed by the United
States.
The treaties granted territory
to the Native Americans.
Marshall said that Georgia did
not have the right to revoke
treaties made between two
sovereign nations.
Indian Removal
Treaties
between
the
Georgia’s
United
laws
States
and the
Native
Americans
Chapter
10 Section 4
President Jackson opposed the Supreme Court
ruling in Worcester v. Georgia.
In 1830, Jackson
put a new
federal law into
effect.
Indian
Removal Act
The act gave Native Americans land in the West in
exchange for their lands in the East.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
When Andrew Jackson became President in 1829,
more than 100,000 Native Americans lived east of
the Mississippi River.
Chickasaw
Choctaw
Creek
Seminole
Cherokee
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
The Seminoles were a
mix of Native Americans
in Florida, Creeks, and
escaped African
American slaves.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
You may be wondering………….
Are there any Native American villages in PA today?
There are no federally recognized Indian tribes in Pennsylvania today.
Non-recognized Indian tribes and communities include:
Eastern Lenape Nation of Pennsylvania:
21 Cedar Lane
Mountville, PA 17554
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
The Cherokees had a distinct culture of their own.
They also adopted some white customs.
They had a written
language, developed
by Sequoyah.
Some learned to
speak, read, and write
English.
They ran businesses,
such as lumber mills.
Many had converted to
Christianity.
In 1827, they formed a constitutional
government. They claimed status as a
separate nation.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Jackson’s Indian Removal Act was enforced in the
1830s.
1830
The Choctaws
signed a
treaty giving
up all of their
lands.
1831–1833
1838
Most Native American
leaders believed they
had no choice.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Jackson’s Indian Removal Act was enforced in the
1830s.
1830
1831–1833
The Choctaws
moved west.
They suffered
greatly on
their journey.
Indian Removal
1838
The federal
government
failed to
provide
enough
supplies, such
as tents and
food.
Chapter
10 Section 4
Jackson’s Indian Removal Act was enforced in the
1830s.
1830
1831–1833
The Cherokees
remained on their land
until after Jackson left
office.
Indian Removal
1838
President Van
Buren forced
the Cherokees
to leave their
lands.
Chapter
10 Section 4
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
The Cherokees’ forced journey to Indian Territory
is known as the Trail of Tears.
More than 4,000 Cherokees died on the trail, due
to the harsh weather and lack of supplies.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
One group of Native Americans, the Seminoles,
refused to leave their land.
1830
1835–1842
The
Seminoles
fought three
wars against
removal.
Indian Removal
1842
Although they
never signed a
peace treaty,
most Seminoles
were forced to
move in the
1840s.
Chapter
10 Section 4
In total, some
100,000 Native
Americans were
driven from their
homes and forced to
walk to a new home.
In Indian Territory, in
present day
Oklahoma, Native
Americans struggled
to rebuild their lives
in very difficult
conditions.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
Closing Questions
Answer the following questions with one complete sentence:
1. What was President Jefferson’s idea regarding the Native
Americans living east of the Mississippi River?
2. What was the difference between Jefferson’s policy regarding
Native Americans and Jackson’s policy regarding Native
Americans?
3. Do you think moving the Native Americans to the Indian
Territory (present day Oklahoma state) helped to preserve their
culture? Explain.
Indian Removal
Chapter
10 Section 4
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