Essentials of Fire Fighting
6th Edition
Firefighter II
Chapter 21 — Fire and Life
Safety Initiatives
Learning Objective 1
Describe the role of a Firefighter II
in planning for and conducting
private dwelling fire safety surveys.
21–1
Private dwelling fire safety surveys
are performed on a voluntary basis.
Can provide information on amount, kind of safety
equipment in home
Not subject to same requirements of local codes
Survey – Indicate hazards, suggest corrective action
Treat as educational opportunity – Not enforcement
21–2
The fire survey is an opportunity to
achieve several goals.
Recommend
actions for
eliminating
nonfire
related
hazards
Look for
common
causes of
residential
fires
Look for
common
causes of
fires
Complete
survey
form,
provide
copy to
occupant
Educate
public
21–3
Planning and public relations are
also aspects of these surveys.
Advanced
planning
• Required to gain full acceptance
• Prevent accidental fires
• Improve life safety conditions
Main
objectives • Help understand, improve conditions
• Citizens know, trust firefighters
• Citizens feel department concerned about welfare
Benefits of
• Increased goodwill can translate into budget support
surveys
21–4
These surveys offer several
kinds of opportunities.
Promote education
after identifying
hazards
Gain information
through surveys
Use information
gathered to meet
community needs,
generate specific
messages
Post survey follow up
or notification of
survey
21–5
Firefighters should take the survey
seriously and use several guidelines.
Conduct surveys in teams of two or
more
Dress, act professionally
Introduce yourself, your partner,
provide proper identification
Explain survey procedure
(Cont.)
21–6
Firefighters should take the survey
seriously and use several guidelines.
Maintain courteous, businesslike attitude at
all times
Focus on preventing fires, eliminating life
safety hazards
Compliment occupants when favorable
conditions are found
Offer constructive suggestions for correcting
(Cont.)
or eliminating hazardous conditions
21–7
Firefighters should take the survey
seriously and use several guidelines.
Ask to survey all rooms; including garage
If accessible, survey basement
Ask to survey attic if used for storage or
contains heating or cooling unit, is accessible
Ask occupant to open any closed doors
(Cont.)
21–8
Firefighters should take the survey
seriously and use several guidelines.
Discuss survey results with
owner/occupant, answer any questions
Thank owners or occupants for
invitation into home
Leave behind educational materials
appropriate for occupants
Keep results of survey confidential; do
not share results with any outside entity
21–9
After the survey is completed, there
are several actions to take.
Post survey
• Leave checklist
• Give copy of
recommendations
• Follow SOPs to
recommend
repairs
Leave materials
Document
• To indicate you
tried to contact
• Unstamped
materials should
not be placed in
mailbox
• Per local SOPs
21–10
REVIEW QUESTION
How can a Firefighter II plan for
conducting a private dwelling fire
safety survey?
21–11
Learning Objective 2
Explain the components that must
be considered when developing fire
and life safety presentations.
21–12
There are several basic skills to use
when presenting safety messages.
Audiencecentered
Good
development
of ideas
Best choice
of words
Good
organization
of ideas
Good
delivery skills
(Cont.)
21–13
There are several basic skills to use
when presenting safety messages.
Good vocal
characteristics
Appropriate
use of humor
Conversational
tone
Positive
attitude
Personal style
Know your
topic
21–14
Audiences will vary and are divided
into several categories.
Present the message
• Based on demographics
• If more than one – Prepare for the
more challenging
(Cont.)
21–15
Audiences will vary and are divided
into several categories.
Age
Educational
level
Cultural
diversity
Socioeconomic
Physical ability
21–16
Fire and life safety messages need to
meet certain criteria to be effective.
Accurate
• Use
developed
resources
• Guidelines
for
answering
questions
Positive
• Remember
positive
rather than
negative
• Instruct
what to do,
not what
not to do
21–17
Targeted
• Based on
several
factors
• Life
changing
events
• Seasonal
messages
You should use one of several
patterns to organize your message
to help make it understandable.
Knowntounknown
Simpletocomplex
Wholepartwhole
21–18
Step-bystep
REVIEW QUESTION
What components must be
considered when developing fire and
life safety presentations?
21–19
Learning Objective 3
Recognize considerations that must
be addressed when giving
presentations to young children and
fire station tours.
21–20
Presenting to young children requires
addressing specific considerations.
Classroom considerations
21–21
(Cont.)
Presenting to young children requires
addressing specific considerations.
Children’s
common
fears
Appropriate
vocabulary
(Cont.)
21–22
Presenting to young children requires
addressing specific considerations.
Learning style
21–23
Fire station tours provide several
opportunities you need to understand.
Enhance department’s public image
Provide fire and life safety messages
Distribute safety awareness literature
May be spur-of-the-moment or scheduled
21–24
Fire station tours require planning and
following of safety guidelines.
(Cont.)
21–25
Fire station tours require planning and
following of safety guidelines.
Decide where
group goes in
case of alarm
• Decide with officer
in charge
• Explain before tour
21–26
Remember
impressions left
will be strong
ones
• Turn off TVs
• Present
professional
workplace
(Cont.)
CAUTION
Provide safety instructions at the
beginning of the tour about what to do
and where to go if an alarm sounds
during the tour.
21–27
Fire station tours require planning and
following of safety guidelines.
Answer all
questions
• Courteously
• To best of ability
21–28
Follow local
SOPs
regarding
• Climbing on
apparatus
• Pictures
• Trying on
protective
clothing
(Cont.)
Fire station tours require planning and
following of safety guidelines.
Station mascots
Demonstrate
equipment,
apparatus with
caution
Do not allow to
roam unescorted
• Meet upon arrival
• Keep together until
tour begins
• Position to prevent
visitors straying
• Exercise caution
when activating
sirens
21–29
• Can be liability
• May need to
restrict presence
REVIEW QUESTION
How can firefighters help address
the fears of small children during fire
and life safety presentations?
21–30
Learning Objective 4
Describe the role of a Firefighter II
in planning for and conducting
preincident planning surveys.
21–31
Preincident planning surveys
gather information before an
emergency occurs.
May assist with
• Locating, controlling fire
• Locating occupants
• Determining potential hazards
• Improving emergency operations
• Improving both firefighter, occupant
safety
21–32
Documentation for preincident
planning surveys show specific details
and are used to reach several goals.
Details
Goals
• Construction type
• Floor plan or layout
• Contents
• Occupancy type
• Hazardous materials storage
• Special processes
• Fire detection and suppression systems
• Fuel load
• Become familiar with structures
• Recognize existing hazards
• Visualize how standard tactics may or may not apply
• Develop new tactics if necessary
• Determine if occupants have conditions that may
prohibit self-evacuation
• Determine if occupants may require translators
21–33
Preincident and code enforcement
surveys are separate types of surveys.
Preincident
Inspections
• Become familiar
with structure
• See if occupants
complied with
codes
21–34
Preincident planning surveys
generally follow the same steps.
Follow
local SOPs
Obtain
floor plans
(Cont.)
21–35
Preincident planning surveys
generally follow the same steps.
Conduct
thorough
survey
May need more
than one visit
Survey
buildings
separately
Discuss results
with
owner/occupant
21–36
Maps, drawings, and photographs can
provide useful documentation.
Helpful to
firefighters
Contain information
May be prepared by insurance
carriers
If
unavailable
or
outdated
Include plot drawing
Note other important features,
information
21–37
(Cont.)
Maps, drawings, and photographs can
provide useful documentation.
Use
common
symbols
Courtesy of Sanborn Map Company
21–38
(Cont.)
Maps, drawings, and photographs can
provide useful documentation.
May create
with
Geographic Information System (GIS)
Other electronic mapping program
Take
photographs
if permitted
Captures detail not in drawings
Most useful in preincident plans
Take from elevated position if possible
Interior, close-ups effective
Video may be made for training if possible
21–39
REVIEW QUESTION
What can a Firefighter II do to
prepare for conducting a preincident
planning survey?
21–40
Summary
• Fire and life safety initiative programs
benefit both the community and the
fire department.
• Firefighters are an important part of
that initiative by providing information
to the public and preparing to respond
to emergencies by surveying occupied
properties.
21–41
Learning Objective 5
Conduct a fire safety survey in an
occupied structure.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 21-II-1.
21–42
Learning Objective 6
Make a fire and life safety
presentation.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 21-II-2.
21–43
Learning Objective 7
Conduct a fire station tour.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 21-II-3.
21–44
Learning Objective 8
Prepare a preincident planning survey.
This objective is measured in Skill
Sheet 21-II-4.
21–45