Utilizing FfT to Enhance
Teaching and Learning
Office of Talent Development
FfT Summer Institute
Presenter: Monica Holmes and Elzora Bellamy Watkins
“Quote of the Day”
Learning how to learn is life’s
most important skill.
Anonymous
Agenda
 Warm up (10 mins)
 FfT topic
 Introductory Activity (15 mins.)
 What are the pieces?
 Challenging Components and Elements
 Let’s take a Look (15 mins)
 All Roads Lead to… (25 mins)
 Closure (2 mins)
Outcome
Participants will understand
how the FfT will be better
able to support teachers in
enhancing teaching
and learning.
The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson
You Talk a Mile a Minute
You Talk a Mile a Minute
The subject is FFT
 Self Assessment
 Research
 Student Centered
 Cognitive
 Constructivist
 Reflective
 Domains
 observation
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
1 59
You Talk a Mile a Minute
The subject is FFT
 Self Assessment
 Research
 Student Centered
 Cognitive
 Constructivist
 Reflective
 Domains
 observation
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
Round 2
You Talk a Mile a Minute
The subject is FFT
 Culture
 Question
 Planning and preparation
 Rigor
 Activity
 Discussion
 Turn and talk
 Professional responsibility
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
1 59
You Talk a Mile a Minute
The subject is FFT
 Culture
 Question
 Planning and preparation
 Rigor
 Activity
 Discussion
 Turn and talk
 Professional responsibility
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
Rate yourself
1.
I’m brand new at the FfT
2. I’m a little familiar with the FfT
3. I’ve trained or participated in the
Pilot or FIRST
The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson
Framework for Teaching
Organization
Domains
(1, 2, 3, and 4)
Components
(8 Essentials)
Elements
(26)
The Framework for Teaching
Domain 1
Domain 2
Planning and Preparation
The Classroom Environment
Domain 4
Domain 3
Professional Responsibilities
Instruction
The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson
Jigsaw
 You have 15
minutes to place
the elements under
the appropriate
elements, and the
components under
the appropriate
Domains.
What are some observations you can
tell about the elements?
The 8 Essential Components
Domain 1:
Domain 2:
Planning and Preparation
Classroom Environment
1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
2b: Establishing a Culture for Learning
1e: Designing Coherent Instruction
2d: Managing Student Behavior
Domain 4:
Domain 3:
Professional Responsibility
Instruction
4a: Reflecting on Teaching
3b: Using Questioning and Discussion
Techniques
4c: Communicating with Families
3c: Engaging Student in Learning
1
4
The Framework for Teaching Charlotte Danielson
2
3
Priorities of the FFT
 What are the FFT has two priorities?
Cognitive engagement
“minds-on”
Constructivist learning
“learning is done by the learner”
Teaching cannot be considered Proficient or
Distinguished if students are not thinking and
doing the learning themselves.
Domain 3: Instruction
Component 3b: Questioning & Discussion Techniques
Elements:
Quality of Questions, Discussion Techniques, Student Participation
Element
Quality of
Questions
Discussion
techniques
Student
participatio
n
Unsat
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Teacher’s questions are
a combination of low
and high quality, posed
in rapid succession.
Only some invite a
thoughtful response.
Most of the
teacher’s questions
are of high quality.
Adequate time is
provided for
students to respond.
Teacher’s questions are
of uniformly high
quality, with adequate
time for students to
respond. Students
formulate many
questions.
Teacher makes some
attempt to engage
students in genuine
discussion rather than
recitation, with uneven
results.
Teacher creates a
genuine discussion
among students,
stepping aside
when appropriate.
Students assume
considerable
responsibility for the
success of the
discussion, initiating
topics and making
unsolicited
contributions.
Teacher attempts to
engage all students in
the discussion, but with
only limited success.
Teacher
successfully
engages all students
in the discussion.
Students themselves
ensure that all voices
are heard in the
discussion
Clip Talk
What evidence of Cognitive engagement and
constructivist learning do you see or hear?
CLIPS
We will be viewing a series of clips of
a ninth grade Algebra 1 lesson.
What are the Behaviors needed to
enhance teaching and learning?
 What would be some student behaviors that depicts
cognitive engagement and constructivist learning?
 What teacher behaviors should be evident to bring
about these student behavior?
All Roads Lead to…
What to consider as you plan…
Academic Rigor in a Thinking Curriculum
 Commitment to a Knowledge Core
 High Thinking Demand
 Active Use of Knowledge
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION • PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
www.pgcps.org
27
Commitment to a Knowledge Core
Includes:

An articulated curriculum that avoids needless
repetition and progressively deepens
concepts

Curriculum and instruction that is organized
around major concepts

Teaching and assessment that focus on the
mastery of core concepts
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION • PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
www.pgcps.org
28
High Thinking Demand
 Students are expected to raise questions, to solve problems,
and to reason.
 Challenging assignments are included in every subject.
 Extended projects are a part of the curriculum.
 Explanations and justification of ideas and opinions are
expected of all students.
 Reflection on learning strategies is evident in discussion and
student work.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION • PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
www.pgcps.org
29
Active Use of Knowledge
Students are expected to:
 synthesize several sources of information,
 test understanding by applying and discussing
concepts,
 apply prior knowledge, and
 interpret texts and construct solutions.
PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY BOARD OF EDUCATION • PRINCE GEORGE’S COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS
www.pgcps.org
30
1c: Setting Instructional
Outcomes
Pieces of the Lesson:

Value, Sequence, & Alignment

Clarity

Balance

Suitability for Diverse Learners
Looking at the lesson plan
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
Elements: Value, Sequence, and alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Value and Sequence
Outcomes represent low
expectations for students
and lack of rigor. They do
not reflect important
learning in the discipline nor
a connection to a sequence
of learning.
Outcomes represent
moderately high
expectations and rigor.
Some reflect important
learning in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes represent
high expectations and rigor,
and important learning in
the discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning.
All outcomes represent high
expectations and rigor, and
important learning in the
discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning both in the
discipline and related
disciplines.
Clarity
Outcomes are either not
clear or are stated as not as
student learning but as
activities. Outcomes do not
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear, or consist
of a combination of
outcomes and activities.
Some outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the outcomes are
clear, but may include a few
activities. Most suggest
viable methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes are
clearing, written in the form
of student learning, and
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Balance
Outcomes reflect only one
type of learning and only
one discipline or strand.
Outcomes reflect several
types of learning but
teacher has made no
attempt at coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for
coordination.
Where appropriate,
outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for both
coordination and
integration.
Suitability for
Diverse learners
Outcomes are not suitable
for the class, or are not
based on any assessment of
student needs.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for most of the
students in the class based
on global assessments of
student learning.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for all students in
the class, and are based on
evidence of student
proficiency. However, the
needs of some individual
students may not be
accommodated.
Outcomes are based on a
comprehensive assessment
of student learning and take
into account the varying
needs of individual students
or groups.
32
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1e: Designing Coherent Instruction
Elements: Learning activities, Instructional materials and resources, Instructional groups, Lesson and unit structure
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Learning
Activities
Learning activities are not
suitable to students or to
instructional purposes, and
are not designed to engage
students in active
intellectual activity.
Only some of the learning
activities are suitable to
students or to the instructional
outcomes. Some represent a
moderate cognitive challenge,
but with no differentiation for
different students.
All of the learning activities
are suitable to students or
to the instructional
outcomes, and most
represent significant
cognitive challenge, and
with some differentiation
for different groups of
students.
Learning activities are highly suitable
to diverse learners and support the
instructional outcomes. They are all
designed to engage students in highlevel cognitive activity, and are
differentiated, as appropriate, for
individual learners.
Instructional
Materials and
Resources
Materials and resources are
not suitable for students, do
not support the instructional
outcomes nor engage
students in meaningful
learning.
Some of the materials and
resources are suitable to
students, support the
instructional outcomes, and
engage students in meaningful
learning.
All of the materials and
resources are suitable to
students, support the
instructional outcomes, and
are designed to engage
students in meaningful
learning.
All of the materials and resources
are suitable to students, support the
instructional outcomes, and are
designed to engage students in
meaningful learning. There is
evidence of appropriate use of
technology and of student
participation in selecting or adapting
materials.
Instructional
Groups
Instructional groups do not
support the instructional
outcomes and offer no
variety.
Instructional groups partially
support the instructional
outcomes, with an effort at
providing some variety.
Instructional groups are
varied as appropriate to the
students and the different
instructional outcomes.
Instructional groups are varied as
appropriate to the students and the
different instructional outcomes.
There is evidence of student choice
in selecting the different patterns of
instructional groups.
Lesson and
Unit Structure
The lesson or unit has no
clearly defined structure, or
the structure is chaotic.
Activities do not follow an
organized progression, and
time allocations are
unrealistic.
The lesson or unit has a
recognizable structure,
although the structure is not
uniformly maintained
throughout. Progression of
activities is uneven, most time
allocations are reasonable
The lesson or unit has a
clearly defined structure
around which activities are
organized. Progression of
activities is even, with
reasonable time allocations.
The lesson’s or unit’s structure is
clear and allows for different
pathways according to diverse
student needs. The progression of
activities is highly coherent.
33
2 Minute Quick Write
How would todays
information have implications
on your work?
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
1 59
2 Minute Quick Write
How would todays
information have implications
on your work?
00
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
10
11
12
13
14
15
16
17
18
19
20
21
22
23
24
25
26
27
28
29
30
31
32
33
34
35
36
37
38
39
40
41
42
43
44
45
46
47
48
49
50
51
52
53
54
55
56
57
58
59
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
Elements: Value, Sequence, and alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Value and Sequence
Outcomes represent low
expectations for students
and lack of rigor. They do
not reflect important
learning in the discipline nor
a connection to a sequence
of learning.
Outcomes represent
moderately high
expectations and rigor.
Some reflect important
learning in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes represent
high expectations and rigor,
and important learning in
the discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning.
All outcomes represent high
expectations and rigor, and
important learning in the
discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning both in the
discipline and related
disciplines.
Clarity
Outcomes are either not
clear or are stated as not as
student learning but as
activities. Outcomes do not
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear, or consist
of a combination of
outcomes and activities.
Some outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the outcomes are
clear, but may include a few
activities. Most suggest
viable methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes are
clearing, written in the form
of student learning, and
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Balance
Outcomes reflect only one
type of learning and only
one discipline or strand.
Outcomes reflect several
types of learning but
teacher has made no
attempt at coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for
coordination.
Where appropriate,
outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for both
coordination and
integration.
Suitability for
Diverse learners
Outcomes are not suitable
for the class, or are not
based on any assessment of
student needs.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for most of the
students in the class based
on global assessments of
student learning.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for all students in
the class, and are based on
evidence of student
proficiency. However, the
needs of some individual
students may not be
accommodated.
Outcomes are based on a
comprehensive assessment
of student learning and take
into account the varying
needs of individual students
or groups.
37
Value and Sequence
Element
Unsatisfactory
Value and Outcomes
Sequence represent low
expectations for
students and lack
of rigor. They do
not reflect
important
learning in the
discipline nor a
connection to a
sequence of
learning.
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Outcomes
represent
moderately high
expectations and
rigor. Some reflect
important learning
in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a
sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes
represent high
expectations and
rigor, and
important learning
in the discipline.
They are
connected to a
sequence of
learning.
All outcomes
represent high
expectations and
rigor, and
important
learning in the
discipline. They
are connected to
a sequence of
learning both in
the discipline
and related
disciplines.
Value and Sequence
Element
Unsatisfactory
Value and Outcomes
Sequence represent low
expectations for
students and lack
of rigor. They do
not reflect
important
learning in the
discipline nor a
connection to a
sequence of
learning.
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Outcomes
represent
moderately high
expectations and
rigor. Some reflect
important learning
in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a
sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes
represent high
expectations and
rigor, and
important learning
in the discipline.
They are
connected to a
sequence of
learning.
All outcomes
represent high
expectations and
rigor, and
important
learning in the
discipline. They
are connected to
a sequence of
learning both in
the discipline
and related
disciplines.
Pieces of the Lesson
 Value, Sequence, & Alignment



Aligned to standards
Part of a bigger picture, previous lesson, beginning lesson,
etc.
Represents high expectations & intellectual rigor (higher
order thinking)
Value, Sequence and Alignment
 Connected to a sequence of learning both in the discipline and
in related disciplines. Does this outcome connect to what
students are learning in other disciplines?
 Is this important learning?
 Does the learning outcome represent high expectation for all
students?
 Is the learning outcome rigorous? If not, how might you rewrite
it to be more rigorous?
 Does the outcome naturally follow what students have
previously learned?
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
Elements: Value, Sequence, and alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Value and Sequence
Outcomes represent low
expectations for students
and lack of rigor. They do
not reflect important
learning in the discipline nor
a connection to a sequence
of learning.
Outcomes represent
moderately high
expectations and rigor.
Some reflect important
learning in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes represent
high expectations and rigor,
and important learning in
the discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning.
All outcomes represent high
expectations and rigor, and
important learning in the
discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning both in the
discipline and related
disciplines.
Clarity
Outcomes are either not
clear or are stated as not as
student learning but as
activities. Outcomes do not
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear, or consist
of a combination of
outcomes and activities.
Some outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the outcomes are
clear, but may include a few
activities. Most suggest
viable methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes are
clearing, written in the form
of student learning, and
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Balance
Outcomes reflect only one
type of learning and only
one discipline or strand.
Outcomes reflect several
types of learning but
teacher has made no
attempt at coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for
coordination.
Where appropriate,
outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for both
coordination and
integration.
Suitability for
Diverse learners
Outcomes are not suitable
for the class, or are not
based on any assessment of
student needs.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for most of the
students in the class based
on global assessments of
student learning.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for all students in
the class, and are based on
evidence of student
proficiency. However, the
needs of some individual
students may not be
accommodated.
Outcomes are based on a
comprehensive assessment
of student learning and take
into account the varying
needs of individual students
or groups.
42
Clarity
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Clarity
Outcomes are either
not clear or are
stated as not as
student learning but
as activities.
Outcomes do not
permit viable
methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear,
or consist of a
combination of
outcomes and
activities. Some
outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the
outcomes are clear,
but may include a
few activities. Most
suggest viable
methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes
are clearing,
written in the
form of student
learning, and
permit viable
methods of
assessment.
Pieces of the Lesson
 Clarity
 Objectives use measurable verbs
 Clearly stated as a learning goal & can be assessed
 Teacher states outcome as learning not just as an
activity
 Outcomes can be assessed/tested
What’s the difference between
Activity and Outcome?
Outcome
 What students are expected to
learn
 Worthwhile and represent
learning central to a discipline
as well high level learning for
the students
 The result or consequence of an
activity in terms of success and
failure
Activity
 What students will do
 A single focus thing that the
student does
 An educational process or
procedure intended to
stimulate learning through
actual experience
Outcome
The outcome is not that the student will
complete page 38 and answer the questions but
what will they learn as a consequence of
answering the question on page 38.
Clarity-Teacher states outcome
as learning not just as an activity
Bringing Clarity, is it an activity or an outcome?
Outcome:
Today you will use your problem-solving skills to resolve the following dilemma…
Activity:
Read question #3 on page 47. work with a partner to answer the question.
(This outcome is not about the answer to the dilemma, but rather the thinking
students engage in to come to a resolution. The outcome allows the teacher to
uncover how students are thinking about a situation and provides an opportunity
to probe for deeper thinking.)
Instructional Outcomes do not describe
what students will do, but what they will
learn.
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
Elements: Value, Sequence, and alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Value and Sequence
Outcomes represent low
expectations for students
and lack of rigor. They do
not reflect important
learning in the discipline nor
a connection to a sequence
of learning.
Outcomes represent
moderately high
expectations and rigor.
Some reflect important
learning in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes represent
high expectations and rigor,
and important learning in
the discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning.
All outcomes represent high
expectations and rigor, and
important learning in the
discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning both in the
discipline and related
disciplines.
Clarity
Outcomes are either not
clear or are stated as not as
student learning but as
activities. Outcomes do not
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear, or consist
of a combination of
outcomes and activities.
Some outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the outcomes are
clear, but may include a few
activities. Most suggest
viable methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes are
clearing, written in the form
of student learning, and
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Balance
Outcomes reflect only one
type of learning and only
one discipline or strand.
Outcomes reflect several
types of learning but
teacher has made no
attempt at coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for
coordination.
Where appropriate,
outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for both
coordination and
integration.
Suitability for
Diverse learners
Outcomes are not suitable
for the class, or are not
based on any assessment of
student needs.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for most of the
students in the class based
on global assessments of
student learning.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for all students in
the class, and are based on
evidence of student
proficiency. However, the
needs of some individual
students may not be
accommodated.
Outcomes are based on a
comprehensive assessment
of student learning and take
into account the varying
needs of individual students
or groups.
49
Balance
Element
Balance
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Outcomes reflect
only one type of
learning and only
one discipline or
strand.
Outcomes reflect
several types of
learning but
teacher has made
no attempt at
coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect
several different
types of learning
and opportunities
for coordination.
Where
appropriate,
outcomes reflect
several different
types of learning
and opportunities
for both
coordination and
integration.
Balance
Balance
 Balance represent factual knowledge and procedural skills
as well as thinking and reasoning, conceptual
understanding and skills in collaboration.
 Among different types of learning (may represent listening,
discussion, writing, drawing, presenting, groupings, etc.)
How is it related to the learning outcome?
 Integrated with other content areas/technology
Domain 1: Planning and Preparation
Component 1c: Establishing Instructional Outcomes
Elements: Value, Sequence, and alignment, Clarity, Balance, Suitability for diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Distinguished
Value and Sequence
Outcomes represent low
expectations for students
and lack of rigor. They do
not reflect important
learning in the discipline nor
a connection to a sequence
of learning.
Outcomes represent
moderately high
expectations and rigor.
Some reflect important
learning in the discipline
and at least some
connection to a sequence of
learning.
Most outcomes represent
high expectations and rigor,
and important learning in
the discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning.
All outcomes represent high
expectations and rigor, and
important learning in the
discipline. They are
connected to a sequence of
learning both in the
discipline and related
disciplines.
Clarity
Outcomes are either not
clear or are stated as not as
student learning but as
activities. Outcomes do not
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Outcomes are only
moderately clear, or consist
of a combination of
outcomes and activities.
Some outcomes permit
viable methods of
assessment.
Most of the outcomes are
clear, but may include a few
activities. Most suggest
viable methods of
assessment.
All the outcomes are
clearing, written in the form
of student learning, and
permit viable methods of
assessment.
Balance
Outcomes reflect only one
type of learning and only
one discipline or strand.
Outcomes reflect several
types of learning but
teacher has made no
attempt at coordination or
integration.
Outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for
coordination.
Where appropriate,
outcomes reflect several
different types of learning
and opportunities for both
coordination and
integration.
Suitability for
Diverse learners
Outcomes are not suitable
for the class, or are not
based on any assessment of
student needs.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for most of the
students in the class based
on global assessments of
student learning.
Most of the outcomes are
suitable for all students in
the class, and are based on
evidence of student
proficiency. However, the
needs of some individual
students may not be
accommodated.
Outcomes are based on a
comprehensive assessment
of student learning and take
into account the varying
needs of individual students
or groups.
54
Suitability for Diverse learners
Element
Unsatisfactory
Basic
Proficient
Suitability
for
Diverse
learners.
Outcomes are not
suitable for the
class, or are not
based on any
assessment of
student needs.
Most of the
outcomes are
suitable for most
of the students in
the class based on
global
assessments of
student learning
Most of the
outcomes are
suitable for all
students in the
class, and are
based on evidence
of student
proficiency.
However, the
needs of some
individual
students may not
be
accommodated.
Distinguished
Outcomes are
based on a
comprehensive
assessment of
student learning
and take into
account the
varying needs of
individual
students or
groups.
Suitability for Diverse Learners
 Instruction is adjusted to accommodate
diverse learners
 Differentiating the Process/Activities
 Differentiating the processes means varying learning
activities or strategies to provide appropriate methods
for students to explore the concepts.
Priorities of the FFT
 The FFT has two priorities
 Cognitive engagement


“minds-on”
Constructivist learning

“learning is done by the learner”
 Teaching cannot be considered Proficient or
Distinguished if students are not thinking and
doing the learning themselves.
Download

The Framework for Teaching - Prince George`s County Public