Interactive Geography
Notebook (IGN)
Mrs. Lehman - Room 115
Guidelines and Purpose:
The IGN is a portfolio of each student’s
work in this class. The purpose is to:
• Involve students in “making sense” of their
notes visually
• Develop nonfiction reading and note-taking
skills
• Teach different approaches to learning
Materials needed:
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Spiral notebook
Pencil
Glue stick
Colored pencils
Tips for IGN Success:
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Bring your notebook to class every day!
Label and date everything in your notebook.
Assignments must be completed on the correct page.
Use color – the notebook is a visual study tool! Color should be
meaningful, helping to organize and illustrate your notes.
If you are absent from class, please check to see what you have
missed (Missed Assignment Sheets under window.) You are still
responsible for the work.
Use pencil to write all text and initial sketches. This allows you
to erase when you have mistakes. Do not use pen or colored pencils to
write text or for initial sketches.
Don’t use markers to color EVER! They bleed through the paper.
Directions for Notebook
Assignments
Students work at different rates, and
although the majority of notebook
assignments will be completed in class, not
every child will finish within the allotted time.
There will be “catch-up” time for those who
need it and “review” time for those whose
notebooks are complete and correct.
Notebooks will be checked and graded
following these times.
Notebook Organization:
The notebook will be organized into a LEFT side and a RIGHT side.
LEFT SIDE: Students Process Information
• The left side of the notebook will be
used for a variety of different
activities.
RIGHT SIDE: Teacher Guides Information
• The right side of the notebook is for
class and reading notes. It contains
“testable” information,
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The left side helps you make sense
of the right-side information and
deepen you understanding.
(The teacher will recommend strategies students could use for
the left side during the 1st quarter of the year.)
It will include notes, handouts and
other assignments.
Preview Strategies
Table of Contents
• Students will set aside the first four pages (front &
back) of their notebook for a Table of Contents.
Unit/Chapter Title Pages
• The first page of each new unit, chapter and section
should be labeled and illustrated.
• Be sure to have a clear, legible title.
• Be colorful, attractive and meaningful…and creative!
Here are some examples of what you might find in your IGN this year:
LEFT side of the Notebook:
RIGHT side of the Notebook:
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Vocabulary
Notes on a:
mini-lesson
lecture
film/video/documentary
small group or large group discussion
guided reading
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ETC.
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paraphrase to clarify items
draw, or glue a photo, sketch, or magazine
picture that illustrates the concept, ideas, or
facts
ask questions about the information
form and express an opinion
predict outcomes or next steps
create a metaphor that captures the essence of
the information/issue
write a reflection on the information or
experience
make connections
create an acronym or write a short poem
(acrostic, haiku or limerick) to help you
remember the information covered
create a graphic organizers like a web, venn
diagram, etc.
Interactive Geography Notebook –
1st Quarter Rubric
10 Points
8 Points
6 Points
4 Points
2 Points
Overall
Organization/Neatness
Work is very
organized; pages
are attached
securely; left
side/ right side
order in tact;
pages are
numbered.
Work is
organized;
pages are loose;
left side/right
side order in
tact; pages are
numbered
Work is a little
confusing; left
side/right side
order in tact;
pages are
numbered
Work has little
order; left
side/right side
order in tact;
no page
numbers
Work has no
order; pages
are missing;
left side/right
side order is
not correct; No
page numbers
Completeness for Right
Side
All work is
clear, complete,
detailed. Anyone
could use as
study guide.
Most work is
done, but some
assignments are
missing.
Work and notes
are mostly
done, but 3-4
assignments are
missing.
Work and
notes are
partially done;
5-6
assignments
are missing.
Much of the
work is
missing or
unreadable.
Completeness for Left
Side
Work is clear,
focused, reveals
personal
reflection.
Work is clear,
focused, and
reflective. 1-2
assignments
missing.
Work is
sufficient and
reflective.
3-4
assignments
missing.
Work is sparse,
but shows
reflection.
5-6
assignments
missing.
Left side is
incomplete or
not reflective.
Follows Assignment
Directions
Directions
consistently
followed.
Student put
exceptional
effort into IGN.
Color is included
and goes beyond
minimum
expectations.
Directions
usually
followed.
Student has put
effort into IGN.
Color is
included; most
details go
beyond
minimum
expectations.
Directions not
always
followed.
Student has put
some effort
into IGN.
Color is
included and
details meet
minimum
expectations.
Directions
inconsistently
followed.
Student put
little effort into
IGN. Color is
rarely included
and few details
meet minimum
expectations.
Directions are
not followed.
Effort
Total
Student has
put little effort
into IGN.
Color is not
included and
details are
incomplete.
TOTAL
_____
Out of 50
points
Vocabulary Strategies
Vocabulary Word
savanna
Sentence
Savannas occur in the climate
regions of southern India and
eastern Africa.
Definition
Tropical grassland with
scattered trees, usually with
wet and dry seasons
Picture
Question Notes
1. Write the title and page numbers of the reading.
2. Divide your paper into columns and label them QUESTION
and ANSWER.
3. Turn each heading or subheading into a question.
(e.g. Ecosystems would become What is an ecosystem?
4. Write the questions in the QUESTION column.
5. Read the information in the section, and take at least 3 bulleted
notes to answer the question. (If you can’t find 3 bulleted notes,
then you probably need to rethink your question.)
6. Write these notes in the ANSWER columns, beside the
question. Move on to the next section and repeat to the end.
Components of an Ecosystem
QUESTION
ANSWER
What is an ecosystem?
•…
•…
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Illustrated Outline
This is another strategy for taking notes and visualizing while you read.
1.
Set your purpose for reading. I will either provide you with the main ideas or you can use the
subheadings from the text.
2.
Turn your notebook sideways. Starting at the margin, separate the page into columns based on the
number of main ideas.
3.
Write a main idea (topic) at the top of each columns, on the margin line.
4.
Write at least 3 bulleted notes under each main idea.
5.
When you’ve finished taking notes on the reading, review the main ideas and draw one picture for each
section. Color the pictures.
6.
Color each column a different color to visually organize your information.
Topics
here
Notes
here
Picture
here
Venn Diagram
These overlapping circles are used to compare (tell what is the same) and
contrast (tell what is different) between 2 things.
Venn diagrams should:
1. Have circles labeled appropriately.
2. Should compare point to point.
3. Have a minimum of 5 unique facts per circle and 3 shared facts in the center.
4. Circles should be colored lightly, with the blended color in the middle.
5. Include one illustration for each topic.
POETRY
Poetry in science is designed to give you a different way to think about a topic
and to act as a summary of your knowledge.
Poetry Helpful Hints
1. Your poem should demonstrate your understanding of the concept.
2. Avoid words that don’t give specific information like “nice” UGH!,
“happy”, or “caring.”
3. Each sentence/phrase should be carefully chosen and must relate specifically
to the subject of the poem.
4. Your illustration and color should enhance the meaning of your poem.
Don’t use random stripes of color.
Acrostic Poems
Write the name of the person or the concept to be defined vertically, like this:
N
A
M
E
C
O
N
C
E
P
T
E
V
E
N
T
Write a short phrase or sentence about the subject for each letter of its title.
It must be more than one word! The phrases used should capture the main
ideas of the text on the right hand page.
Haiku
A haiku captures the essence of an
idea, concept, or emotion.
It does not have to rhyme.
Line 1:
Line 2:
Line 3:
phrase contains 5 syllables
phrase contains 7 syllables
phrase contains 5 syllables
Limericks
The limerick is a poem constructed of 5 lines with an AABBA rhyme scheme.
It tells a humorous story.
The syllables have the following patterns:
Line 1 (7-9 syllables): A
Line 2 (7-9 syllables): A
Line 3 (5-7 syllables): B
Line 4 (5-7 syllables): B
Line 5 (7-9 syllables): A
(da
(da
(da
(da
(da
da
da
da
da
da
DUM
DUM
DUM
DUM
DUM
da
da
da
da
da
E.g.:
There was an Old Man with a beard,
Who said, “It is just as I feared!
Two Owls and a Hen
Four Larks and a Wren,
Have all built their nests in my beard!”
da
da
da
da
da
DUM da da DUM)
DUM da da DUM)
DUM)
DUM)
DUM da da DUM)
Diamante Poem
A diamante poem is used to compare and contrast. (Where have we seen this
before?) It should be written in the shape of a diamond. (Catchy name, eh?)
Line 1:
Line 2:
Line 3:
Line 4:
Line 5:
Line 6:
Line 7:
Topic 1
2 Words to describe Topic 1
3 action words (-ing) about Topic 1
A 4 or 5 word phrase describing both topics – what they
have in common – (A complete thought but not necessarily
a complete sentence.)
3 action words that describe Topic 2
2 words to describe Topic 2
Topic 2
Storyboards
A storyboard is an illustrated summary.
1. Read about the process, event, or person in your notes.
2. Highlight the 8 most important things that happened in the process, even
or person’s life.
3. Turn the notebook sideways. Title the storyboard on the margin line.
4. Separate the remainder of the page into 8 panels, like this:
TITLE
HERE
5. At the bottom of each box, write your caption. Your caption must be at
least one complete sentence and explain what is going on in your illustration.
6. Above or below the caption, draw you illustration. This should be
appropriate, meaningful, and colored.
7. When you have finished, your storyboard should be a meaningful
summary of the process, event, or person’s life we have studied.
Download

Interactive Geography Notebook (IGN)