Student Growth
Objectives:
Beyond Compliance
Ms. Marie Phillips
[email protected]
Learning Goals
 WALT use data to inform our
instruction and create high quality
formative and summative
assessments
 WALT utilize multiple measures to
set challenging, yet attainable goals
for our students
TEST YOUR
KNOWLEDGE
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
1. True or False – SGOs account for 15% of my
summative evaluation as a teacher.
False
 Non-SGP teachers; 80% teacher practice, 20%
SGO
 SGP teachers: 70% teacher practice, 20% SGO,
10% mSGP
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
2. True or False – SGOs must be submitted to my
building principal by October 31, 2014.
True
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
3. True or False – SGOs are submitted to NJDOE
for approval.
False*
* Exception - Collecting and reviewing SGOs may
be part of the support NJDOE provides to
Priority/Focus schools.
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
4. True or False – Teachers are required to create
a pre-assessment whose sole purpose is to
determine the starting point for students’ SGOs.
False
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
5. True or False – Teachers may make
adjustments to their SGOs.
True
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
6. True or False – SGOs must be aligned to NJ
content standards.
True*
*Exception - Teachers of severely disabled
students may set non-academic SGOs.
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
7. True or False – The building Principal sets the
SGO scoring plan that is used by all teachers.
False
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
8. True or False – Teachers may work
collaboratively to develop the focus area of a
grade/department’s SGO.
True
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
9. True or False – All SGOs must begin in October
and end in June.
False
Test Your Knowledge
2014-2015
10. True or False – Special Education teachers
working in an inclusion setting may set the same
SGO as their co-teachers.
True
Student Growth Objectives
NJDOE Definition: A long term academic goal
that teachers set for groups of students that is:
 Specific and measurable
 Aligned to state academic standards
 Based on student growth and/or achievement
 Set using available student learning data
 Developed by a teacher in consultation with
his/her supervisor
 Approved and scored by a teacher’s
supervisor
www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
GROUP SHARE
What did you learn from the
SGO process last year?
What will you do differently
this year?
What Has DOE Learned?
 Reflection of what effective teachers typically do
 Driven by teachers, supported by administrators
and centered on student learning
 A pre-test as the sole measure of a student’s
starting point is not effective
 Setting the same growth targets for all students
results in overly ambitious/overly cautious goals
 Quality assessments = quality SGOs
 Common sense should always prevail
According to the NJ DOE
“There have been no changes in the
requirements for SGOs in 2014-15.”
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ/teacher/objectives.shtml
2013/14
Update
2014/15
2015/16
55%
Classroom
Observations
70%
60%
Classroom
Classroom
Observations Observations
30% SGP
10% SGP
SGP (Up to
20%)
15% SGO
20% SGO
20% SGO
Tested
85%
Non Classroom
Tested Observations
15% SGO
80%
No change
Classroom
Observations
20% SGO
SGOs: What Are They; Really?
Not
They Are
 A significant
addition to the
work of a teacher.
 A reflection of
what effective
teachers typically
do.
According to the NJDOE (2013)
SGOs: What Are They; Really?
Not
They Are
 An administratordriven compliance
exercise.
 Driven by
teachers,
supported by
administrators,
and centered on
student learning.
According to the NJDOE (2013)
SGOs: What Are They; Really?
Not
 SGOs are a
statistically precise
evaluation of
growth based on a
pre-test/post-test
model of
performance.
They Are
 SGOs are learning
targets for key
concepts and skills
that students can be
expected to master
in a course based on
a rough sense of
where they start.
According to the NJDOE (2013)
Five Adjustments for
2014/15
1. SGOs count for 20% of the teacher
evaluation.
2. SGO format is modified to reflect the critical
components of the SGO process.
3. SGOs should include a significant portion of
the courses/subjects, standards, and
students for which the teacher is responsible
throughout the year.
Five Adjustments for
2014/15
4. Educators must explain why the selected
standards are critical for the students.
5. SGOs must include a quality assessment
process that falls within the framework of
the normal testing schedule.
The Value of SGOs
For Educators…
Improves their practice.
For Evaluators…
Provides an authentic measure of
teacher effectiveness.
For Students…
Improves student learning.
Type of
SGO
Definition
General
Focused on the teacher’s entire
student population for a given course.
Includes a large proportion of
curriculum standards
Specific –
Student
Group
Focused on a subgroup of students
that needs specific support.
Introducing
The 2014/15
Student Growth
Objective Form
Improving
the Process
Taking it from…
TO…
COMPLIANCE
Quality
The SGO Development Process
PREPARE
SGO
SGO REVIEW
and
EDUCATOR
SGO SCORE
STUDENT
GROWTH
OBJECTIVES
PROCESS
SCORE
SGO RESULTS
PRE-APPROVAL STAGE
DEVELOP
SGO
SGO
SUBMISSION
& APPROVAL
IMPLEMENT AND
MONITOR SGO
EVIDENCE
COLLECTION
FOCUSED
STRATEGIES
MID-YEAR
SGO REVIEW
SGOs are…
S
M
A
R
T
SMART SGOs are…
Specific
Measurable
Attainable/
Ambitious
The SGO should The SGO should The SGO should
be simplistically be measurable
be attainable;
written, and
and provide
reasonably
clearly defined. tangible evidence challenging both
The SGO should
that you have
you and your
focus on a
achieved the
students, but
specific content
objective.
clearly defined
area or skill.
so that it can be
achieved.
Resultsdriven
Timed
The SGO should
focus on
measuring
outcomes, not
activities.
The SGO should
be organized
around a
timeframe that
presents a
reasonable sense
of urgency.
STEPS TO CREATING HIGH
QUALITY SGOs
 Identify area of focus
 Select multiple standards and determine
level of significance
 Choose/Develop Quality Assessments
 Analyze available student data
 Set appropriate learning targets for each
student
 Create scoring plan
Identifying Your Focus
District or Building Goals
Areas of deficiency for your
student population
NJCCCS or Common Core
Standards of greatest
significance
Standards
•Select
multiple
standards.
•Align to
curriculum.
Significance of Standard
 How much time is spent teaching the
standard?
 Value beyond your grade/course
Next grade level/course
Other academic areas
Life/College/Career
Think About This…
In Real-Estate it is about…
Location
Location
Location
In Education it is about…
Assessment
Assessment
Assessment
Choosing / Developing a Quality
Assessment: Things to Consider
 Style
 What I have now
 Available resources
 Time
 Specific use
 Depth of
Understanding
 Degree of Challenge
HIGH QUALITY
ASSESSMENT
HIGH QUALITY SGO
Assessments Enhance
Learning
 Provide evidence of learning
 Can motivate learners
 Signal the need to adjust
Assessment Blueprint
Prior to test design
During test design
After test design
Approval Checklist
Designing Your
Assessments
 Purpose
 Valid/Accurate Inferences
 Aligned to Standards
 Significance of Standard
 Range of Rigor/Depth of Knowledge
 Unbiased and Accessible
 Reliability
PURPOSE
 What information do you want to obtain:
 Baseline data regarding student’s knowledge?
 Progress towards an identified goal?
 Summative data as to achievement of
learning goals?
Begin with the end in mind
Formative vs. Summative
Assessment
Formative Assessment
 A process
 During instruction
 Carried out by both
teachers and students
 Results used to adjust
teaching and learning
strategies by both
teachers and students
 Assessment for learning
Summative Assessment
 A single measurement
 At the end of instruction
 Designed and conducted
by teachers
 Results used to evaluate
student performance by
teachers
 Assessment of learning
STOP AND SHARE
What types of formative
assessments have you used
effectively?
FORMATIVE
ASSESSMENTS
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Observations
Questioning
Discussion
Journals
Assignments
Projects
Pop Quizzes (not-graded)
Exit/Admit Slips
Learning/Response Logs
Graphic Organizers
Peer/Self Assessments
Written Questions / Exercises
with Short, Extended or
multiple-choice Answers
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Practice Presentations
Diagnostic Tests
Visual Representations
Kinesthetic Assessments
Individual Whiteboards
Four Corners
Think Pair Share
Appointment Clock
Simulations/Business Games
Conferencing/Reviews
Meaningful Homework
Assignments
http://wvde.state.wv.us/teach21/ExamplesofFormativeAssessment.html
Valid/Accurate Inferences
 Do the questions provide us valid/accurate
evidence about what the student has
learned?
 Are the questions assessing
knowledge/mastery of the
standard?
Valid/Accurate Inference About Learning?
SS 6.1.4.D6 Describe the civic leadership qualities and historical
contributions of George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, and
Benjamin Franklin toward the development of the United States
government.
You must be a citizen of the United States and _______ years
of age to be President of the United States.
a) 50
b) 42
c) 30
d) 35
Significance of Standard
More Questions/Points
Fewer Questions/Points
Range of Rigor/DOK
NJDOE states a high quality
assessment has a range of rigor that:
 Is representative of the rigor of
instructional level and content
delivered in the course, and
 Provides stretch at both ends of
ability levels
Webb’s Depth of Knowledge
Accessibility
 Clear format and instructions
Fair to all students regardless of
background
 Appropriate modifications
Example
Directions: Write a paragraph
based on the writing prompt.
Directions: Write a paragraph
based on the writing prompt.
Describe how the game of soccer
is played. Include information
about the necessary skills, the
rules of the game, and the
equipment needed.
Describe a game you like to play.
Include information about the
necessary skills, the rules of the
game, and the equipment
needed.
Reliability
 Environment conducive to success
 Consistency in scoring
 Clear directions and scoring criteria to
students
 Test security
 Time allotted is sufficient
 Length of assessment
 Consistency in results
SGO TIP
Use skills based
rubrics for
SGOs.
61
62
TMI Education
64
http://rubistar.4teachers.org/index.php
STOP AND SHARE
1.
Why is it important to create
common assessments?
2. What are some ways to ensure
consistency in scoring across grade
levels/courses?
SGO TIP
Do not rely
solely on pre
and post
assessments.
Setting Learning Targets
Misconception
Reality
SGOs are a statistically
precise measure of
growth based on a pretest/post- test model of
performance.
SGOs are learning targets
for key concepts and
skills that students can be
expected to master in a
course based on a rough
sense of where they start.
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
STOP AND SHARE
1.
What are some concerns about using
the pre-test/post-test model to assess
student learning?
1.
In what ways does utilizing only one
data source impact the development
of high quality learning targets?
The Pre-Test/Post-Test Model
 Extra work for teachers and students that
doesn’t result in meaningful student
achievement
 “This doesn’t count” mentality
 Does not consider other barriers to learning
 Focuses on one source of data – distorted
picture
 Minimizes importance of what teachers know
about their students
SGO TIP
Ensure that
there is a
baseline for
every student.
GROUP SHARE
What information is available
that may assist you in
predicting students’ learning?
Possible Information Sources
 Current/Previous year’s test scores
 Current year’s formative assessments
 Standardized test scores over a period of 2-3
years
 Artifacts from portfolios
 Attendance records
 Identified barriers to learning
 Observations as to learning style and needs
 Important markers of future success
Markers of Future
Success
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
Sample Target Setting Plan
Preparedness
Group
Prior Year Test
Score
Current Year
Test Score
Average
Markers of
Future Success
High
250 - 300
85-100
9-12
Medium
200-249
70-84
5-8
Low
<200
<70
0-4
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
Creating a Tiered SGO
Review multiple data sources
available on students
 Identify patterns to best assign
students to groups based on level
of preparedness
 Evaluate and predict growth
targets
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
SMALL GROUPS OF
STUDENTS
 Use number of students instead of
percentages
 Set goal based on the average score on the
assessment for the group – include provision
for those who test out of group during year
 Set individual goals for students especially if
wide variety of needs and performance levels
Key Components of High
Quality SGOs
1. The SGO statement is specific and measurable
– what do you expect students to know and be
able to do.
2. The scoring plan is consistent with the SGO
statement and has a logical four point scale.
3. Growth or achievement targets are
differentiated to be ambitious and achievable
for all students.
Key Components of High
Quality SGOs
4. The SGO includes a significant proportion of
students and curriculum.
5. The assessment is comprehensive and of
good quality. Evidence is provided for standards
alignment.
6. More than one data source is used for
baseline information. Used thoughtfully to set
realistic targets.
SGO TIP
Utilize the SGO
Quality Rating
Rubric during the
development
process.
Creating Scoring Bands
 Represent your predictions as to
learning targets for students
Established by the teacher with
guidance from the Principal to
ensure rigor
Challenging yet attainable
 Special consideration for unique
situations
Sample Scoring Band
SGO Statement: 75% of my 6th grade students will achieve their target score on
the district’s cumulative science assessment.
State the projected scores for each group and what percentage/number of students
will meet this target at each attainment level. Modify the table as needed.
Preparedness
Student
Group
Target Score
Attainment Level in Meeting Student Growth Objective
Percentage of Students Achieving Target Score
Exceptional
4
Full
3
Partial
2
Insufficient
1
3
70
≥85%
≥75%
≥65%
<65%
2
80
≥85%
≥75%
≥65%
<65%
1
90
≥85%
≥75%
≥65%
<65%
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
Weighted Scoring Band
Preparedness
Group
Number
Percentage
of
of Students
Students
in Each
in Each
Group
Group
Weight
Assigned to
Attainment
Score
Objective
Attainment
Level
Weighted
Score
Low
36/65
56%
0.56
3
1.68
Medium
21/65
32%
0.32
4
1.28
High
8/65
12%
0.12
2
0.24
Total Score
3.2
Non-Weighted
3.0
http://www.state.nj.us/education/AchieveNJ
SGO “To Do” List
September / October
Prepare & Develop
Identify needs , establish student
starting points, and goals for growth.
Develop assessments , instructional
strategies , and SGO Statement.
October
Submit & Implement
Conference with principal, gain approval
by Oct. 31, and begin to implement.
October – February
Monitoring
Monitor the progress of the students.
February
Mid –Year Review
Review and make adjustments as
needed by February 15.
March / April
Scoring & Results
Summative assessments administered
and SGOs scored.
SGO Workshop
Feedback Form:
 Reflect
 Jot
 Turn in
CONTACT
INFORMATION:
Ms. Marie Phillips
[email protected]
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PowerPoint SGOs 10-17-14 - Foundation for Educational