Ohio Teacher Evaluation System:
Assessment of Teacher
Performance
1
2
Training Purposes/Objectives
• Understand and be able to apply the OTES
Framework.
• Be prepared to utilize the observation processes
(pre-conference, observation, post-conference)
presented from the Teacher Performance OTES
framework component.
• Understand and apply necessary tools from the
OTES model
• Understand and apply the evaluation rubric to
personal classroom practice
3
Purpose
“The (OTES) evaluation procedure is
to be used for the improvement of
instruction and learning with the
teacher and evaluator working
collaboratively in support of the
teacher to achieve that goal.”
4
Text Rendering
Purpose: To collaboratively construct meaning, clarify and
expand our thinking about a text or document
• Each table will be assigned a document that they need to
render (count off by 6)
A. “Professional Growth/Improvement Plan” (p. 63-64)
B. “Implementing the OTES Process” (p.65-66)
C. “Using the Evidence to Inform Holistic Performance Ratings” (p. 67-69)
Text rendering asks you to dig deeply into the document as a
group and define/describe what the most important
information is
5
Text Rendering
Set Up:
Take 3-5 minutes to read the document your group has been
assigned. After you are done reading:
• Place a star next to the paragraph that you believe is most important
• Underline the sentence within the paragraph that you think is most
important H
• Highlight the word that best captures the main point of the
paragraph.
Steps:
P. 62
Go through steps 1-4 with your table group, and we will go through
steps 5-6 as a large group
6
Present Your Text Rendering Findings
• Each group will present their text rendering and
the ‘big ideas’ they got from each document.
7
The Whole…..
P. 70 and handout in pouch
8
The Part of our focus Today
9
Evaluation Documents
(Prior to Formal Observation)
Self Assessment
Summary
Professional Growth
Plan
pp. 27-28
1. Students
2. Content
3. Assessment
4. Instruction
5. Learning Environment
6. Collaboration and
Communication
7. Professional Responsibility
and Growth
p. 29
• Annual Focus
• Student
Achievement Goal
• Teacher
Performance Goal
10
eTPES
Electronic Portal
• Teacher Evaluation System
• Principal Evaluation System
11
Placemat Consensus
2 minutes to
write individually
Participant
A
3 minutes to talk and
reach consensus
Participant
B
Consensus
Elements
Participant
D
Participant
C
5 minutes
to debrief
When you walk out of a lesson that you deem to be
effective, what were the elements that led you to that
12
decision?
Whole School Consensus
• Now that each group has come up with
their own consensus, lets take a moment to
make a whole school consensus
• What is it that we would expect to see in a
classroom that is deemed “effective”?
13
I.
Instructional Planning
a. Focus for Learning (Standard 4-Instruction)
Sources of evidence to be provided by the teacher during pre-conference, supported by a
discussion with the evaluator.
b.
Assessment Data (Standard 3-Assessment)
Sources of evidence to be provided by the teacher during pre-conference, supported by a
discussion with the evaluator.
c.
Prior Content Knowledge, Sequence, and Connections (Standard 1: Students;
Standard 2: Content; Standard 4:Instruction)
Sources of evidence to be provided by the teacher during pre-conference, supported by a
discussion with the evaluator.
d.
Knowledge of Students (Standard 1: Students)
An analysis of student data to be provided by the teacher during the pre-conference, supported
by a discussion with the evaluator.
II.
Instruction and Assessment
a.
Lesson Delivery (Standard 2-Content; Standard4-Instruction; Standard 6:
Communication)
Sources of evidence demonstrated by the teacher and collected by evaluator during formal
observation, classroom walkthroughs, and informal observations.
b.
Differentiation (Standard 1: Students; Standard 4: Instruction)
Sources of evidence demonstrated by the teacher and collected by evaluator during formal
observation, classroom walkthroughs, and informal observations.
c.
Resources (Standard 2: Content; Standard 4: Instruction)
Sources of evidence demonstrated by the teacher and collected by evaluator during formal
observation, classroom walkthroughs, and informal observations.
d.
Classroom Environment (Standard 1: Students; Standard 5: Learning
Environment; Standard 6: Collaboration and Communication
Sources of evidence demonstrated by the teacher and collected by evaluator during formal
observation, classroom walkthroughs, and informal observations.
e.
Assessment of Student Learning (Standard 3: Assessment)
Sources of evidence demonstrated by the teacher and collected by evaluator during preconference, formal observation, classroom walkthroughs, informal observations, and postconference.
III.
Professionalism
a.
Professional Responsibilities (Standard 6: Collaboration and Communication;
Standard 7: Professional Responsibility and Growth)
Sources of evidence included in the teacher’s Professional Development Plan or Improvement
Plan; shared during the pre-conference and/or post-conference, and derived from daily
interaction with others.
14
Instructional Planning
OTES Rubric Structure
FOCUS FOR
LEARNING
(Standard 4:
Instruction)
Sources of
Evidence:
Pre-Conference
Ineffective
Developing
Proficient
Accomplished
The teacher does not
have a clear focus for
student learning or the
objective is too general
to guide lesson planning
or the objective is
inappropriate for the
students.
The teacher states a
focus for student
learning that is
appropriate for students.
The teacher develops a
measurable objective
for student learning
that aligns with the
Ohio standards.
The teacher can explain
the importance of the
objective and its
appropriateness for
students.
The teacher develops
an ambitious and
measurable objective
for student learning
that aligns with the
Ohio standards.
Teacher can explain
how the objective fits
into the broader unit
and course goals for
content learning and
skills.
15
Rating
16
Instructional Planning
Let’s dive into instructional planning:
• Focus for Learning
• Assessment Data
• Prior Content
Knowledge/Sequence/Connections
• Knowledge of Students
17
Process of Modeling Your Thinking
(Think-Aloud)
I
do
Think Aloud
We
do
Scaffold & Cue
You
do
Students Explain Thinking
18
Rubric Activity
Directions:
Administrator/Trainer
will model metacognition
for highlighting key
words from Knowledge
of Students.
19
Knowledge of Students
Assessment of Teacher Performance:
OTES Rubric
Proficient
The teacher demonstrates familiarity with students’
background knowledge and experiences and
describes multiple procedures used to obtain this
information.
The teacher’s instructional plan draws upon an
accurate analysis of the students’ development,
readiness for learning, preferred learning styles,
and backgrounds and prior experiences.
20
Rubric Activity
Directions:
• As a table, discuss and highlight key
words from the “Proficient” column
for Focus for Learning, Assessment
Data, Prior Content
Knowledge/Sequence/Connections,
and Lesson Delivery
• For groups who finish early, go back
to the Proficient column for these
areas and note the differences from
Developing and Accomplished.
21
I. Pre-Observation Conference
Video clips: Clips next slide. Pre- Conference
focus is on planning! Topics are:
Instructional Planning
• Focus for Learning
• Assessment Data
• Prior Content
Knowledge/Sequence/Connections
• Knowledge of Students
22
Video Clip 1 Pre – Conf- 52 Seconds
Video Clip 2 Pre – Conf- Show 5 -7 minutes
• http://www.nietbestpractices.org/OHIO/po
rtals/0/tap%20library/articulate%20files/fo
lder-724/document-199/player.html
• http://www.nietbestpractices.org/OHIO/N
avigation/VideoLibrary/LessonsbyGradeLe
vel/5thGrade/tabid/897/Default.aspx
• Log In Needed for Video 2 Check Notes
23
II. Instruction and Assessment
•
•
•
•
•
Lesson Delivery
Differentiation
Resources
Classroom Environment
Assessment of Student Learning
24
Rubric Activity
Directions:
• Individually, highlight key words from the “Proficient”
column for Differentiation, Resources, Classroom
Environment, and Assessment of Student Learning.
• For those who finish early, go back to the Proficient
column for these areas and note the differences from
Developing and Accomplished.
25
When do you collect evidence?
SCRIPTING
Prior to the lesson being
observed
During the lesson
After the lesson
Pre-Conference
•Review of lesson
•Generate questions from
lesson plan
What the students What the
teacher says and does
say and do
Post-Conference
Communication between
classroom observation and
post-conference
26
Collecting/Capturing Evidence
Capture:
•What the teacher says
•What the teacher does
•What the students say
•What the students do
•Copy wording from visuals used during the lesson
•Record time segments of lesson
27
Hints for Capturing Evidence
When capturing evidence during the lesson, these strategies will
help you collect accurate and defensible notes.
1. Time: Capture the length of different segments of the lesson
2. Abbreviate: When possible abbreviate; after the lesson
write out what you abbreviated
3. Verbatim: Capture verbatim dialogue when possible
4. Paraphrase: Use parentheses to indicate paraphrasing
5. Circulate: Circulate as necessary to collect evidence from
teacher, students and student work
28
Hints for Capturing Evidence
When capturing and categorizing evidence after the lesson,
these strategies may help you categorize effectively.
6. Label: Begin categorizing your notes by labeling evidence for
rubric standard areas/indicators
7. Q & F: After you finish go thru your script and label all
questions and feedback (Lesson Delivery and Assessment
standards)
8. Upfront Summary: After you finish, go through the evidence
and write a brief summary of the lesson
9. Lesson Analysis: Identify the lesson’s primary objective and
sub-objectives (Focus for Learning)
29
Sample Evidence Collection Notes
Sample Evidence Collection Notes
Observing Classroom Instruction
•We will view clips of classroom instruction and
compare them to the rubric, Area: Instruction and
Assessment.
Remember to collect
evidence from which
you can validate your reasoning for
placement on the rubric and assignment
of a rating.
32
Instruction and Assessment
•
•
•
•
•
Lesson Delivery
Differentiation
Resources
Classroom Environment
Assessment of Student
Learning
33
The Lesson
Grade 4 LA Lesson
http://nietbestpractices.org/OHIO/portals/0/tap%20librar
y/articulate%20files/folder-745/document201/player.html
Modules are short. Click on #9…if time show10
and 11… Show number 12 with evidence
34
Lesson 2 Choice
HS Science
http://www.nietbestpractices.org/OHIO/portals/0/tap%20
library/articulate%20files/folder-746/document200/player.html
35
Collecting and Categorizing Evidence:
Language to Avoid
Avoid the use of the following language:
•Value Statements:
• I think…
•I feel…
•She should have…
•She could have…
•When I taught this, I …
The discussion about the lesson should be based on the
evidence and the rubric.
36
Group Roles
• Once you get to the group work, there are a
few roles that need to be assigned:
– “Holder of the handbook”
• This person will make sure that we are interpreting
each standard correctly, and answer any questions
group members have about it.
– “Keeper of the rubric”
• This person will make sure that all conversations are
about what the rubric asks for.
Group Roles continued
– “Value Judgment Police”
• This person will make sure people do not use value
judgment statements such as:
– I would have…
– She should have…
– Timekeeper & Evidence Gatherer
Debrief Evidence and Ratings
•Whole group will debrief the
evidence that was captured and the
ratings that were given.
39
III. Professionalism
How will you provide evidence for
Professional Responsibilities?
What evidence might an evaluator use to
evaluate Professional Responsibilities?
40
Post-Observation Conference
Purpose:
To provide an opportunity for reflection on the areas of
reinforcement and refinement from a lesson to inform
and improve future practice. The post-observation
conference should focus on two areas from the rubric
(one for reinforcement and one for refinement).
41
Four Key Elements of the Instructional
Post-Conference
1.
2.
3.
4.
Introduction/Greeting
Reinforcing the Teacher (Relative Lesson Strength)
Refining the Teacher (Relative Lesson Weakness)
Present Evidence and Rating Connected to the
Rubric
42
Four Key Elements of the Instructional
Post-Conference
1. Introduction/Greeting/Establish Length
• Review Conference Process
• General Impression Question
- “How do you think the lesson went?”
2. Reinforcing the Teacher
• Identify an area of Reinforcement (ONLY one
area)
• Ask Self-Analysis Question
• Provide evidence from notes
43
Four Key Elements of the Instructional
Post-Conference
3. Refining the Teacher’s Skill:
• Identify an area of Refinement (ONLY one area)
• Ask Self-Analysis Question
• Provide evidence from notes
• Give a recommendation for future practice
4. Present evidence and rating connected to the
rubric
44
Post Confernce
What Does it Look Like?
• http://www.nietbestpractices.org/OHIO/po
rtals/0/tap%20library/articulate%20files/fo
lder-747/document-192/player.html
45
Wrap-Up and Questions ?
46
Download

Morning powerpoint on OTES