School: Athens Drive High School
Grade Level: 10th Grade English Language Arts
What is A.P.E. and Its’
Importance?
The What…
A=Assertion P=Proof E=Explanation
Its’ Importance
Constructed response questions require the test taker to create a persuasive
answer that incorporates PROOF and strong REASONING. Therefore,
A.P.E. is a format that incorporates necessary components for
EFFECTIVELY addressing these types of test items.
BOTTOM LINE: It establishes what a good answer looks like.
The Breakdown: “A”
Key Points to Remember
1.
2.
A= Assertion (What is
YOUR answer to the
question?)
Make sure you
RESTATE the question
within your assertion.
Constructed Response Question: What is the
author’s purpose for writing “Eleven?”
Author Sandra Cisneros’ purpose for writing
“Eleven” is to assert the notion that the experiences
behind a given age are more important than the age
itself.
The
Breakdown:
“P”
Key Points to Remember
1.
2.
P=prove your assertion is CORRECT
Provide direct quotes from the
selection that SUPPORT your
assertion (must be relevant and
accurate)
Author Sandra Cisneros’ purpose for writing
“Eleven” is to assert the notion that the
experiences behind a given age are more
important than the age itself. This is assertion is
demonstrated when the narrator says, “Because
the way you grow old is kind of like an
onion…today I wish I was one hundred and two
instead of eleven because…I’d would’ve known
what to say…”
The Breakdown: “E”
Key Points to Remember
1.
E= Explain your proof/conclude
2.
Make sure your explanation: (1)
explains the meaning of the
quote (2) identifies any literary
concepts (if applicable) (3)
explains HOW it supports your
assertion and (4) brings closure
to your answer.
Author Sandra Cisneros’ purpose
for writing “Eleven” is to assert the
notion that the experiences behind a
given age are more important than the
age itself. This assertion is demonstrated
when the narrator says, “Because the
way you grow old is kind of like an
onion…today I wish I was one hundred
and two instead of eleven because…I’d
would’ve known what to say…” The
narrator’s thoughts conveys her desire to
be more mature and prepared face a
challenge she feels is beyond her meager,
11 years of experience. Furthermore, the
reader can infer the narrator’s thoughts
highlight the importance of the familiar
adage, “With age comes experience,”
hence the exaggeration of using 102
years of age to represent full maturation.
A Visual
Conclusion…
Constructed Response Rubric
(This rubric will be used for all assigned constructed response questions. Make sure you
are familiar with the language of the following expectations!)
Points
Expectations
10
Correctly and effectively uses A.P.E. format; EXCEPTIONAL diction, syntax
and conventions; NO grammatical errors
9
Correctly uses A.P.E. format; decent diction and syntax; NO MORE than ONE
grammatical error
8
Uses SOME parts of the A.P.E. format correctly, but not all; average
diction and syntax; 2 grammatical mistakes are apparent
7
Misuses A.P.E. format; diction and syntax are present, but are
ELEMENTARY in usage and language; 3 or more grammatical
mistakes are apparent
1-6
Response is off topic; does not adequately address the prompt; A.P.E.
format is not apparent
***Note: You may receive a score of a “0” if your work is sloppy, illegible, and/or
lacking in effort.***
In her short story “Eleven,” Sandra Cisneros uses
figurative language to create a realistic and poignant
narrative voice. In utilizing repetition, such as with
the repeating age countdown “eleven, ten, nine…”
and similes, such as “the way you grow old is kind of
like an onion,” the author establishes for the reader
just how young Rachel is and how much she has to
learn by extension. Overall, these devices help
communicate to the reader one if Cisneros’ main
themes: that independent of one’s age, experiences
are collective and life isn’t something one can ever
really grow out of– an ironically adult lesson for one
so young.
Download

Writing With A.P.E. - English II with Mr. Davis