Phillip Albonetti
Jackie Gantzer
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Identify and Explain the components of a
Toulmin essay
Examine the Toulmin Rubric and its structure
Analyze sample essays in accordance with the
Toulmin Rubric
Identify resources to support teaching
Toulmin in the classroom
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Components and Examples of Toulmin
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Claim
Premise
Evidence
Warrant
Objection/Reply
The Rubric
 Example Essays
 Resources
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Claim
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Definition: The main argument, or point of
view, of an essay; what you are trying to
“prove.”
◦ Claim of Fact
 Setting up recycling bins at school will reduce our
carbon footprint.
 Our school should add a computer technology class.
◦ Claim of Value
 Euthanasia is immoral.
 Capital punishment is barbaric.
As I read off the following phrases, hold a
“thumbs up!” if it’s a Claim
And a “thumbs down!” if it’s a topic
Claim
Premise
Premise
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Definition: A sub-point of the main
argument; a reason to support the claim.
◦ Claim: Our school should add a computer
technology class.
 Premise: Having a computer technology class would
prepare students for future employment.
 Premise: Many students are very skilled on computers;
having this class would help them explore their
strengths and interests.
 Premise: After learning more computer-based skills,
students could help support any school IT issues.
Watch the following clip and identify:
• Claim
• 3 Premises
Coke vs. Pepsi
Claim
Premise
Premise
Evidence
Evidence
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Definition: the “proof” for the premise/topic sentence.
Much like a science classroom, evidence in an essay
needs to be observable and/or measureable.
◦ Claim: Our school should add a computer
technology class.
 Premise: Having a computer technology class would
prepare students for future employment.
 Evidence: Around 75% of jobs today incorporate technology to
some degree.
 Evidence: For example, if a student wanted to be a mechanic,
they use computers to run diagnostics before they begin repair
work.
 Evidence: Technology skills are useful in jobs that don’t use
computers, too.
Are these evidence statements observable? Measureable? CLAP
hard if they are, do a weak clapper if they’re not.
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Evidence must also be reliable and/or
reasonable.
◦ If it’s a research paper, it must be cited or
widely accepted as fact.
◦ If it’s an on-demand essay, it should be
provable and reasonable.
Champ Kind: “It is anchorman,
not anchorlady! And that is a
scientific fact!”
Brian Fantana:
“They've done
studies, you
know. 60% of
the time, it
works every
time.”
Ron Burgundy: “I'm a man who discovered the wheel and
built the Eiffel Tower out of metal and brawn. That's what
kind of man I am. You're just a woman with a small brain.
With a brain a third the size of us. It's science.”
Chupacabra
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Is the alleged animal on the video a
Chupacabra?
◦ What evidence do you have to prove your claim?
Claim
Premise
Premise
Evidence
Evidence
Warrant
Warrant
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Definition: the connection between the evidence
and the premise or overall claim. It serves to
further explain rationale for a premise.
Answers the questions: What does this
demonstrate? What does this prove? Why is this
important? What does this mean?
◦ Claim: Our school should add a computer
technology class.
 Premise: Having a computer technology class would
prepare students for future employment.
 Evidence: Around 75% of jobs today incorporate
technology to some degree.
 Evidence: For example, if a student wanted to be a
mechanic, they use computers to run diagnostics before
they begin repair work.
 Warrant: This shows that even jobs that are considered more
“manual labor” are utilizing technology these days.
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Sometimes students will put their warrant
before the evidence.
 Premise: Having a computer technology class would
prepare students for future employment.
 Warrant: Many jobs today, including those
considered to be manual labor, use technology in
some capacity.
 Evidence: Around 75% of jobs today incorporate
technology to some degree.
 Evidence: For example, if a student wanted to be a
mechanic, they use computers to run diagnostics
before they begin repair work.
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As I read each statement, determine whether
it would be considered an EVIDENCE
statement or a WARRANT statement by
pointing towards the East or the West.
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Turn to a partner and begin reviewing the 4
Toulmin components we’ve covered so far.
Explain what each component is and what it
accomplishes in the essay.
Claim
Premise
Evidence
Warrant
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When you’re finished, “tag team” your
partner, and they will go through them as
well.
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Recycling
Identify examples of the following from this
clip
◦
◦
◦
◦
Claim
Premise
Evidence
Warrant
Claim
Premise
Premise
Evidence
Evidence
Warrant
Warrant
Objection
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Definition: potential counter-arguments to a claim
Providing an objection shows that the student has
a thorough understanding of the argument, has
thought through several points of view, and has
thus, determined the best option.
◦ Examples
 Many people believe that recycling is too expensive and
time-consuming.
 Others have expressed that students should be able to use
physical violence as a means of defending themselves.
 Some students say that including another foreign language
class is more important than a computer technology class.
Claim
Premise
Premise
Objection
Evidence
Evidence
Reply
Warrant
Warrant
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Definition: response to an objection
Should include evidence and warrants, just
like the other paragraphs.
Examples
• Many people believe that
recycling is too expensive and
time-consuming.
• Others have expressed that
students should be able to use
physical violence as a means of
defending themselves.
• Some students say that including
another foreign language class
is more important than a
computer technology class.
• In the long run, not recycling will
actually cost tax payers more
money.
• If students respond to violence
with violence, it will become a
cycle in which everyone gets
hurt.
• Computer technology classes are
more applicable to our future
than foreign language classes.
Essay Paragraphs/
Sections
Scores
Essay Section Components
Essay Section Component
Elements
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Take a few minutes and look through the
rubric. What other sections and components
will students be scored on that we haven’t
talked about?
Are there any parts that seem confusing to
you, or that you will need more explanation
about?
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Page 11 in your ELA binders
Offers definitions, explanations,
examples, and a guide to scoring
essays using the rubric.
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Exemplars
◦ 8th Grade Tindley Exemplar, “Referral Beat Down”
 Page 60
In groups, identify the following from this essay:
Paragraph 1: Claim
Paragraphs 2-4: Premise, Evidence, Warrant
◦ HS Tindley Exemplar, “Fun Time for Homecoming”
 Page 65
Individually, identify the following from this essay:
Paragraph 1: Claim
Paragraphs 2-3: Premise, Evidence, Warrant
Paragraph 4: Objection, Reply
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Teaching Toulmin - Tindley Accelerated Schools