Connected learning:
A cross-curriculum approach
to ICT
Stacey Quince
Deputy Principal
Campbelltown Performing Arts
High School
School context
• Campbelltown Performing Arts High School is located in
South-Western Sydney and has an enrolment of 1140
students, of which 67 identify as ATSI students.
• Students access the school via local area (60%) or through
audition (40%) in the areas of dance, drama, music or circus.
• The school is recognised for its outstanding achievement in
the areas of quality pedagogy, academic achievement,
integration of ICT, the performing arts and student
leadership. The school enjoys a high profile in the community
and significant parent support.
School focus is to continuously
improve student learning outcomes
through:
• Data driven, targeted teacher professional
learning
• Whole school emphasis on quality pedagogy
• Consistent, supportive welfare system
• Recognition and celebration of success
Process
• 1. Teacher professional learning with
representatives from across subjects
• 2. Identification of ‘key concept’ for crosscurriculum approach to teaching and learning
• 3. Development of an integrated assessment task
and marking guidelines
• 4. Collaborative programming using backward
mapping
• 5. Implementation of units, including team
teaching
• 6. Reflection and evaluation
Project 1
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Year 7 unit – English, science, PDHPE and art
Core concept – Relationship with Our World
Core skills –collaboration, communication
Rich task – group presentation using a range of
language modes (photostory, powerpoint, film)
Science
4.8 – A student describes features of
living things.
Students develop an understanding of
what makes them a living thing within
the world.
English
4.9 – A student demonstrates
understanding that texts express
views of their broadening world and
their relationships within it.
Students explore how language is used
in a range of texts to represent
relationships in their world.
Our Relationship with Our World
Students will develop an understanding of how they ‘fit
into’ their world. They will develop knowledge about how
their sense of self and relationships are formed and
influenced. Students will make connections between how
their relationship with their world is represented and
explored in English, science, visual arts and PDHPE.
Visual Arts
4.4 – A student recognises and uses
aspects of the world as a source of
ideas, concepts and subject matter in
visual arts.
Students investigate how aspects of
their world are represented in art.
PDHPE
4.1 – A student describes and analyses
the influences on a sense of self.
Students analyse ways that the world
affects how they feel about
themselves.
Integrated assessment (skills A)
• Collaboration - A student
demonstrates the ability to work
as part of a group by making
meaningful contributions to set
tasks.
DEVELOPED FROM:
• E4.11 – A student uses, reflects on
and assesses individual and
collaborative skills for leaning.
• S4.22 – A student undertakes a
variety of individual and team tasks
with guidance.
• P4.13 – A student demonstrates
cooperation an support of others in
social, recreation and other group
contexts.
A - A student demonstrates the
ability to make substantial
contributions to set tasks as a
member of a group.
B - A student demonstrates the
ability to make considerable
contributions to set tasks as a
member of a group.
C - A student demonstrates the
ability to make adequate
contributions to set tasks as a
member of a group.
D - A student demonstrates the
ability to make inconsistent
contributions to set tasks as a
member of a group.
E - A student demonstrates the
ability to make limited
contributions to set tasks as a
member of a group.
Integrated assessment (skills B)
• Communication
A student selects and uses
communication skills to present
their understanding of their
relationship with their world.
DEVELOPED FROM:
• E4.1 – A student responds to and
composes texts for understanding,
interpretation, critical analysis and
pleasure.
• S4.18 – A student, with guidance,
presents information to an audience to
achieve a particular purpose.
• P4.11 – A student selects and uses
communication skills and strategies
clearly and coherently in a range of new
and challenging situations.
• A. A student uses highly
developed communication skills to
present an understanding of their
relationship with their world.
• B. A student uses well developed
communication skills to present an
understanding of their relationship
with their world.
• C. A student uses adequate
communication skills to present an
understanding of their relationship
with their world.
• D. A student uses basic
communication skills to present an
understanding of their relationship
with their world.
• E. A student uses limited
communication skills to present an
understanding of their relationship
with their world.
Project 2
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Year 8 unit – English, history, music and art
Core concept – Impact of contact
Core skills – ICT, collaboration, communication
Rich task – film (animation, live action or
claymation). Outcomes and type of task
determined by teachers at the commencement of
the planning phase.
Task outline
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
You have been asked to develop a film for the NAIDOC
Week Film Festival that explores “how indigenous and
non-indigenous peoples have experienced and responded
to contact with each other”. The purpose of the film is to
develop in your audience an understanding of the impact
‘contact’ has had on Aboriginal people and Australian
society as a whole.
You are to work as part of a group of film makers to
produce a film of 3 – 5 minutes. Your film must be
engaging and informative and effectively use a range of
ICT skills and film concepts.
Assessment
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Task developed to address syllabus outcomes
from multiple subjects with assessment criteria
developed by the students.
Team teaching of ‘unpacking’ outcomes using
IWB.
Classification of outcomes by students - content,
ICT, collaboration.
Class discussion around the development of
criteria.
Levels of achievement determined by students.
ICT criteria
Outcomes
A student:
• (Music 4.6) experiments with
different forms of technology in
the composition process
• (Eng 4.3) responds to and
composes texts in different
technologies
• (Hist 4.10) selects and uses
appropriate oral, written and
other forms, including ICT, to
communicate effectively about the
past
• (VA 4. 6) selects different
materials and techniques to make
artworks
Criteria
A student demonstrates
the ability to use ICT
skills to present a film
that uses a range of
concepts and strategies
(including shot types,
camera angles and
movement, sound and
music, dialogue and
speech, colour).
Marking guidelines for ICT
Outstanding A student uses highly developed ICT skills to present a
sophisticated film effectively using an extensive range of concepts
and strategies (including shot types, camera angles and movement,
sound, dialogue and speech, colour).
High A student uses well developed ICT skills to present a
comprehensive film effectively using a wide range of concepts and
strategies (including shot types, camera angles and movement, sound,
dialogue and speech, colour).
Sound A student uses adequate ICT skills to present a satisfactory
film using a range of concepts and strategies (including shot types,
camera angles and movement, sound, dialogue and speech, colour).
Basic A student uses basic ICT skills to present an inconsistent film
using a small number of concepts and strategies (including shot types,
camera angles and movement, sound, dialogue and speech, colour).
Limited A student uses limited ICT skills to present a narrow film
using few concepts and strategies (including shot types, camera angles
and movement, sound, dialogue and speech, colour).
Project 3
• Year 7 unit – English, science, maths, HSIE
• Core concept – Indigenous and non-Indigenous
approaches to environmental sustainability
Process
• Teachers identified outcomes from their respective
syllabuses that could be taught and assessed through a
common rich task (wiki, podcast, blog).
• These outcomes were mapped by teachers.
• Units of work developed as per previous projects.
• Students then unpacked the outcomes during a lesson
that was team-taught by the four teachers.
• Teachers facilitated a process whereby students mapped
the outcomes using IWB.
• With support, students then wrote the outline of the task
and marking criteria.
Challenges of cross-curriculum
approaches to pedagogy
• Time! To plan, to share knowledge and skills, to
team teach....
• Engendering ownership
• Finding authentic leverage points in syllabuses
• Addressing the ‘us’ and ‘them’ mentality
• Aligning with teaching and learning programs
• Ensuring consistency of assessment across
classes within one subject
Benefits of cross-curriculum
approaches to pedagogy
• Maximises time on task for students
• Requires students to make connections in their
learning
• Develops in students deep understanding of key
concepts
• Utilises areas of expertise of staff (especially ICT)
• Deepens teachers’ knowledge and understanding
• Increases pedagogical collaboration between
teachers across the school
• Maximises opportunities for consistency of teacher
judgment
• Rewarding for teachers and students
Tips for cross-curriculum pedagogy
• Start with TPL!
• Identify ‘obvious’ links between subjects – don’t try to put
a square peg...
• Build collaborative teaching and assessment processes
• Build the project around the syllabus outcomes
• Make it part of your teaching and learning programs, not
something ‘extra’
• Engage in team teaching across subjects
• Provide lots of opportunities for professional dialogue
throughout the process
• Provide opportunities for student ownership – be flexible
• Encourage calculated risk-taking
• Have fun!
Thank you and good luck!
[email protected]
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Cross-curriculum pedagogy