WWII INTERACTIVE
POWERPOINT LESSONS
Jared Smith
Directions
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Read through each slide
Use the action button in the bottom right hand
corner to advance to the next slide
Answer each question:
 If
answered correctly you will advance to the correct
page, and will be able to advance to the next slide
 If answered incorrectly you will be advanced to the
incorrect page and will have to click on again, and will
have to reanswer the question till its answered correctly
Goals
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Students will be able describe the impact Hideki
Tojo had on Japan.
Students will understand the Genocide that took
place during the Holocaust.
Students will understand the course of events that
occurred at Pearl Harbor on December 7th, 1941.
Table of Contents
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Lesson One: Hideki Tojo
Lesson Two: Nazi Concentration Camps
Lesson Three: Pearl Harbor
Lesson One: Hideki Tojo
Biography
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Hideki Tōjō was born in the Kōjimachi district of Tokyo
in 1884.
He was the third son of Hidenori Tōjō, a lieutenant
general in the Imperial Japanese Army.
He was the third son of Hidenori Tōjō, a lieutenant
general in the Imperial Japanese Army.
In 1909 he married Katsuko Ito, with whom he had
three sons and four daughters.
Early Military Career
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Tojo graduated from the 17th class of the Imperial
Japanese Army Academy in 1905, ranked 42nd out
of 50 cadets, and was commissioned as a Second
Lieutenant in the infantry.
He graduated with top grades from the 27th class
of the Army Staff College in 1915, after which he
was promoted to the rank of captain and assigned
as commander of the 3rd Imperial Guards
Regiment.
Early Military Career
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In 1919, he was dispatched to Germany as a
military attaché. On his return to Japan in 1920, he
was promoted to major.
In 1921, he again traveled overseas, this time as a
resident officer in Germany.
In 1922, Tojo returned to Japan to assume the post
of instructor at the Army Staff College. In 1929, he
was promoted to lieutenant colonel.
Question One
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In 1922 Tojo returned to Japan to take up what
post?
A.
Colonel
B.
Admiral of the Navy
C.
Instructor at the Army Staff College
D.
General of the Japanese Army in Germany
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Early Military Career
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During the 1920s, Tojo became involved in Army
politics. He was a leading member of the Toseiha
along with Kazushige Ugaki, Hajime Sugiyama,
Kuniaki Koiso, Yoshijiro Umezu, and Tetsuzan
Nagata.
They attempted to represent the more conservative
moderates in opposition to the extremist Kodoha
group led by Sadao Araki.
Hideki Tojo in Military Uniform
Rise to Prime Minister
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In October 18, 1941, Tojo was appointed Army
Minister in the second Fumimaro Konoe Cabinet, and
remained in that post in the third Konoe Cabinet. He
was a strong supporter of the Tripartite Alliance
between Japan, Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy. As
Army Minister he continued to expand the war with
China.
Question Two
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Tojo was appointed minister of the army in what
year?
A.
B.
C.
D.
1941
1942
1943
1944
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Rise to Prime Minister
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At the time, Prince Higashikuni Naruhiko was said to
be the only person who could control the Army and
the Navy and was recommended by Konoe and
Tojo. Hirohito rejected this option, arguing that a
member of the imperial family should not have to
eventually carry the responsibility for a war against
the Occident. Following the advice of Koichi Kido,
he chose instead Tojo, who was known for his
devotion to the imperial institution. The Emperor
summoned Tojo to the Imperial Palace one day
before Tojo took office.
Rise to Prime Minister
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He was given one order from the Emperor: To make
a policy review of what had been sanctioned by
the Imperial conferences. Tojo, who was on the side
of the war, nevertheless accepted this order, and
pledged to obey.
On November 2, Tojo and Chiefs of Staff Hajime
Sugiyama and Osami Nagano reported to Hirohito
that the review had been in vain. The Emperor then
gave his consent to war
Rise to Prime Minister
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On 5 November, Hirohito approved in Imperial
conference the operations plan for a war against
the West and had many meetings with the military
and Tojo until the end of the month. On 1 December,
another imperial conference finally sanctioned the
"War against the United States, England and
Holland”.
Question Three
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On December 1st, the imperial conference
sanctioned the war against three countries, which
one of these countries did the conference not
sanction war against?
a.
b.
c.
d.
US
France
Britain
Holland
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As Prime Minister
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Tojo continued to hold the position of Army Minister
during his term as Prime Minister, from 18 October
1941 to 22 July 1944. He also served concurrently
as Home Minister from 1941-1942, Foreign Minister
in September 1942, Education Minister in 1943,
and Commerce Minister in 1943.
Tojo before the International Military Tribunal for the
Far East
Capture, Trial and Execution
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When American military police surrounded the
house on 8 September 1945, they heard a muffled
shot from inside. Major Paul Kraus and a group of
military police burst in. Tojo had shot himself 4 times
in the chest, but despite shooting directly through
the mark, the bullets missed his heart and
penetrated his stomach.
Capture, Trial and Execution
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He was sentenced to death on 12 November 1948
and executed by hanging on 23 December 1948. In
his final statements he apologized for the atrocities
committed by the Japanese military and urged the
American military to show compassion toward the
Japanese people, who had suffered devastating air
attacks and the two atomic bombs.
Question four
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Hideki Tojo was sentenced to death on November
18th, and executed on December 23rd of which
year?
a.
b.
c.
d.
1948
1949
1950
1951
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Lesson Two: Nazi Concentration
Camps – The Experiments
Experiments
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During World War II, Nazi doctors conducted as
many as 30 different types of experiments on
concentration-camp inmates. They performed these
studies without the consent of the victims, who
suffered indescribable pain, mutilation, permanent
disability, or in many cases death as a result. At the
Nuremberg "doctor's trial," which brought 23
German doctors to trial immediately after the war,
prosecutors found 15 defendants guilty of war crimes
and crimes against humanity; seven were hung. Here
are some of the most notorious experiments:
High Altitude
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In 1942, Sigmund Rascher and others conducted
high-altitude experiments on prisoners at Dachau.
Eager to find out how best to save German pilots
forced to eject at high altitude, they placed inmates
into low-pressure chambers that simulated altitudes
as high as 68,000 feet and monitored their
physiological response as they succumbed and died.
High Altitude
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Rascher was said to dissect victims' brains while they
were still alive to show that high-altitude sickness
resulted from the formation of tiny air bubbles in
the blood vessels of a certain part of the brain.
Of 200 people subjected to these experiments, 80
died outright and the remainder were executed.
Question Five
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True or False: Nazi doctors did high altitude test on
prisoners because they were trying to find out how
best to save German pilots forced to eject at high
altitudes?
 True
 False
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Freezing
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To determine the most effective means for treating
German pilots who had become severely chilled
from ejecting into the ocean, or German soldiers
who suffered extreme exposure on the Russian front,
Rascher and others conducted freezing experiments
at Dachau.
For up to five hours at a time, they placed victims
into vats of icy water, either in aviator suits or
naked; they took others outside in the freezing cold
and strapped them down naked.
Freezing
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As the victims writhed in pain, foamed at the mouth,
and lost consciousness, the doctors measured
changes in the patients' heart rate, body
temperature, muscle reflexes, and other factors.
Some 80 to 100 patients perished during these
experiments.
Question Six
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True or False: As the victims writhed in pain, foamed
at the mouth, and lost consciousness, the doctors
measured changes in the patients' heart rate, body
temperature, muscle reflexes, and other factors.
 True
 False
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Twins
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In an effort to find ways to more effectively multiply
the German race, Dr. Josef Mengele performed
experiments on twins at Auschwitz in hopes of
plumbing the secrets of multiple births.
After taking all the body measurements and other
living data he could from selected twins, Mengele
and his collaborators dispatched them with a single
injection of chloroform to the heart.
Twins
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Of about 1,000 pairs of twins experimented upon,
only about 200 pairs survived.
Question Seven
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Of about ______ pairs of twins experimented
upon, only about ____ pairs survived?
a.
b.
c.
d.
2000; 100
2000; 200
1000; 100
1000; 200
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Seawater
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Dr. Hans Eppinger and others at Dachau conducted
experiments on how to make seawater drinkable.
The doctors forced roughly 90 Gypsies to drink only
seawater while also depriving them of food.
The Gypsies became so dehydrated that they
reportedly licked floors after they had been
mopped just to get a drop of fresh water.
The experiments caused enormous pain and
suffering and resulted in serious bodily injury.
Tuberculosis
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To determine if people had any natural immunities
to tuberculosis, and to develop a vaccine against
the disease, Dr. Kurt Heissmeyer injected live
tubercle bacilli (bacteria that are a major cause of
TB) into the lungs of inmates at the Neuengamme
concentration camp.
About 200 adult subjects died, and Heissmeyer had
20 children from Auschwitz hung in an effort to hide
evidence of the experiments from approaching
Allied forces.
Question Eight
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True or False: Seawater experiments on the gypsies
made them so dehydrated that they reportedly
licked floors after they had been mopped just to
get a drop of fresh water.
 True
 False
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Lesson Three: The Attack on Pearl
Harbor
Japan attacks the US
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The tide pushing the United States toward War was
flowing much faster than either leader knew.
To almost everyone’s surprise, however, the attack
that brought the United States into the war came
from an unexpected country-not from Germany but
from Japan.
Japan’s Ambition
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In Japan, expansionists had long dreamed of
creating a vast colonial empire that would stretch
from Manchuria and China south to Thailand and
Indonesia.
The Japanese began their southward push in July of
1941 by taking over French military bases in
Indochina.
The United States protested this new act of
aggression by cutting off trade with Japan.
Japan’s Ambition
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The embargoed goods included the one thing
Japan could not live without-oil to fuel its war
machine.
Japanese military leaders warned that, without oil,
Japan could be defeated without its enemies ever
striking a blow.
The leaders declared that Japan must either
persuade the United States to end its oil embargo
or seize the oil fields in the Dutch East Indies.
Question Nine
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When the US cut off trade with Japan, which major
product were the Japanese now so concerned with
getting?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Coal
Steel
Oil
Food
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Japan’s Ambition
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In October, the militant Japanese general Hideki
Tojo became the new prime minister of Japan.
Shortly after taking office, Tojo met Japan’s revered
emperor, Hirohito.
November 5, 1941, the prime minister ordered the
Japanese navy to prepare for an attack on the
United States.
Japan’s Ambition
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The U.S. military had broken japans secret
communication codes and knew that Japan was
preparing for a strike.
What it didn’t know was where the attack would
come.
Late in November, Roosevelt sent out a “war
warning” to military commanders in Hawaii, Guam,
and the Philippines.
Pearl Harbor Memorial
Japan’s Ambition
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Then, late on December 6, 1941, the president
received a decoded message that had been
intercepted.
This message instructed Japans peace envoy to
reject all American peace proposals.
Japan’s Ambition
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“This means war,” Roosevelt told his friend and
adviser Harry Hopkins. “It’s too bad we can’t strike
first and prevent a surprise,” Hopkins replied. “No,
we can’t do that,” Roosevelt reportedly responded.
“We are a democracy of peaceful people. We
have a good record. We must stand on it.”
Question Ten
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Why didn’t President Roosevelt attack Japan
before they could attack us, if he knew it was going
to happen?
a.
b.
c.
d.
Wasn’t 100% sure an attack was imminent
Did not want to face the political pressure
Was fearful of the Japanese
Wanted to uphold our Democratic record
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The attack on Pearl Harbor
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Early the next morning, a Japanese dive-bomber
swooped low over the U.S. naval base at Pearl
Harbor-the largest us. naval base in the pacific.
The bomber was followed by more than 180
Japanese warplanes launched from six aircraft
carriers.
As the first Japanese bombs found their targets, a
radio operator flashed this message: “Air raid on
Pearl Harbor. This is not a drill.”
The attack on Pearl Harbor
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For an hour and a half, the Japanese planes were
barely disturbed by American antiaircraft guns and
blasted target after target.
For Japan, the attack on Pearl Harbor was a
stunning victory. The Japanese navy all but crippled
the entire U.S. Pacific Fleet in one blow.
Its own casualties numbered only 29 planes.
The attack on Pearl Harbor
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At the white house Eleanor Roosevelt watched
closely as her husband, with a “deadly calm,”
absorbed the news from Hawaii, “each report more
terrible than the last.”
The surprise raid had sunk or badly damaged 18
ships. About 350 planes had been destroyed or
severely damage. Some 2,400 people had died,
and another 1,178 had been wounded.
Question Eleven

The surprise raid had sunk or badly damaged ___
ships. About ___ planes had been destroyed or
severely damage.
a.
b.
c.
d.
18; 350
19; 300
18; 300
19; 350
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The attack on Pearl Harbor
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Beneath the presidents’ calm, Eleanor could see how
worried he was. “I never wanted to have to fight
this war on two fronts,” Roosevelt told his wife. “We
haven’t the Navy to fight in both the Atlantic and
Pacific…so we will have to build up the Navy and
the Air Force and that will mean that we will have
to take a good many defeats before we have a
victory.”
The next day, President Roosevelt addressed congress.
“Yesterday, December 7, 1941, a date which will live in infamy,” he said, “…the
Japanese launched an unprovoked and dastardly attack on American soil.”
The attack on Pearl Harbor
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He asked for a declaration of war against Japan,
which congress quickly approved.
Three days later, Germany and Italy declared war
on the United States.
For all the damage done at Pearl Harbor, perhaps
the greatest was to the cause of isolationism. “The
only thing now to do,” said the isolationist senator
Burton Wheeler after the attack, “is to lick the hell
out of them.”
Question Twelve
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Pearl Harbor occurred on what date?
a.
b.
c.
d.
December 6th, 1941
December 7th, 1941
December 8th, 1941
December 9th, 1941
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