Four Kinds of
Sentences Plus
Sentence Structures
Simple
 One Independent clause
 A subject and a predicate (verb)
 Ex: Christopher Columbus sailed for
Spain.
 Independent Clause
 Can be on its own just
like this lady.
Compound
 Two independent clauses joined by a
conjunction and separated by a comma
 Conjunctions: FANBOYS
 For, and, nor, but, or, yet, so
 Ex: John Cabot reached the east coast of
North America, but he never made it
back to England.
Compound
 2 independent
clauses can be on
their own like these
people, but choose
to be together. A
sentence is joined by
a conjunction and a
comma. They are
joined by their hands.
8th Grade Exercise 1-Identify the Subject and Verb
1. As protection from such weapons, warriors
in battle needed special equipment.
2. Some warriors used shields of wood or
animal hides.
3. In ancient Assyria, soldiers wore leather
armor with bronze reinforcements.
4. By 1800 B.C., the Greeks had made the
first metal armor out of bronze.
5. Later, the Romans manufactured strong
iron armor and designed special equipment
such as shinguards.
8th Grade Exercise 3-Identify the Subject and Verb
Label as Simple or Compound
1. Over the years, African American performers
have earned much acclaim and won a number
of Academy Awards.
2. Hattie McDaniel won an Oscar for her role in
Gone with the Wind in 1939.
3. Sidney Poitier acted in stage plays and made
several movies early in his career.
4. Poitier won an Oscar in 1963 for Lilies in the
Field, and he later made many popular films.
5. McDaniel and Poitier were the first African
Americans to receive Academy Awards.
7th Grade Exercise 1-Identify the Subject and Verb
1. My favorite escape from city life is the green
world of Central Park in New York City.
2. Its beautiful woods and relaxing outdoor
activities are just a few minutes from our
apartment.
3. The enormous size of the park, however, can
sometimes be a problem.
4. Often, I take this map with me for guidance.
5. Using the map, I can easily find the zoo, the
band shell, and the Lost Waterfall.
7th Grade Exercise 3-Identify the Subject and Verb
Label as Simple or Compound
1. The Amazon River is located in South America
and is one of the longest rivers in the world.
2. The Amazon begins in Peru, and it flows
across Brazil to the Atlantic Ocean.
3. The river carries more water than any other
river and drains about one fifth of the earth’s
entire freshwater supply.
4. The Amazon is actually a network of several
rivers, but most people think of these
combined rivers as only one river.
Complex
 Independent clause and a dependent
clause
 Joined together by a “dependent” word
such as when, because, even though
 Because Portugal found a sea route to
Asia, it gained control of trading.
 Portugal gained control of trading
because it found a sea route to Asia.
Complex
 A complex sentence is like a parent and
a child. The parent is independent, and
the child is dependent.
Compound-Complex
 A compound-complex sentence has two
independent clauses joined by a
conjunction and at least one dependent
clause
 Compound + Complex = Compound-Complex
 Ex: Although John Cabot found new sea
routes to North America, he never made
it back to England, and he was believed
to have died at sea in a storm.
Compound-Complex
 A compound-complex
sentence is like having two
parents and a child.
 The two parents are two
independent clauses joined
by a conjunction
 FANBOYS
 The child is a dependent
clause and joins the
sentence with a
“dependent” word such as
when, because, even
though…
Kinds of Sentences

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
Declarative: a statement.
Imperative: command
Exclamatory: shows emotion!
Interrogative: question?
Look at Four Kinds of
Sentences Plus Sentence
Structures Worksheet
 Read the simple sentences.
 Circle the subject and underline the verb
in each sentence.
 Highlight the word or punctuation that
helps you figure out the kind of sentence.
Compound Sentence
Practice
 Read the compound sentences.
 Circle the comma and conjunction.
 Underline both independent clauses.
 Highlight the word or punctuation that helps
you figure out the kind of sentence.
Complex Sentence
Practice





Read the complex sentences.
Underline the independent clause once.
Underline the dependent clause twice.
Circle the dependent word.
Highlight the word or punctuation that
helps you figure out the kind of sentence.
Compound-Complex
Practice
 Reread the complex and compound
sentences.
 How can we combine them to make a
compound-complex sentence that makes
sense? You might not use all parts of
both sentences.
 Ex: Before you get here, where do you
like to go for dinner, and where would
you like to meet?
Compound-Complex
Practice
 On the back of the chart, write 2 more
compound-complex sentences.
Identify
 Go swimming.
 Simple and imperative
 When do you want to go to the beach,
and where do you want to go?
 compound and interrogative
 I would love it if you went swimming with
me!
 If you went swimming with me, I would
love it!
 Complex and exclamatory
Writing
 Try to write different kinds of sentences
with different sentence structures on your
worksheet.
 On the back write at least 2 sentences
that are compound-complex related to
the topic.
 Use summer as your topic.