Dr. Bill
Vicars
ASL
Linguistics
Quick Review:
What is
phonology?
Phonology is a
study of the
smallest
contrastive
units of a
language.
What two
types of
segments are
signs
segmented
into?
Signs are
segmented
into holds and
movements.
During the
hold portion of
a sign what
parameters
does that sign
have?
Handshape
Orientation
Location
Nonmanual
During the
movement
segment of a
sign what
parameters
does that sign
have?
Handshape
Orientation
Location (!)
Nonmanual
LOUSY
AWKWARD
PREACH
3-MONTH
3-DOLLARS
9-WEEKS
[49]
What is
morphology?
Morphology is the
study of the
smallest
MEANINGFUL units
of language and
how those units are
used to build new
words (or signs).
[51]
[51]
[53]
[53]
[55]
[57]
The first contact rule, the
single sequence rule, and the
weak hand anticipation rule are
morphological rules.
[57] “GOOD” and “NIGHT”
[58] “GOOD-NIGHT”
[58]
[59]
Movement epenthesis, hold
deletion, and assimilation
are phonological rules.
[59]
[60]
English:
GREEN-HOUSE
(Does that mean a
house that is
green?)
Compounds create
new meanings.
Example:
THINK-MARRIAGE
“BELIEVE”
Review Activity
In considering phonology and
morphology, which of the following
signs doesn’t fit with the other on
the list? [p49]
a. LOUSY
b. AWKWARD
c. THREE-DOLLARS (In this sign,
the three handshape functions as a
morpheme]
d. PREACH
THREE-DOLLARS (In this sign, the
three handshape functions as a
morpheme]
In English, adding “er” to the term
“walk” to create “walker” is an
example of: [p52]
a. creating a process morpheme
b. using a form morpheme to
create a noun from a verb
c. adding a free morpheme to
create a process
d. a compound word
In English, adding “er” to the term
“walk” to create “walker” is an
example of: [p52]
* using a form morpheme to create
a noun from a verb
In English, emphasizing or
“stressing” the first syllable of the
word subject instead of the second
syllable, is an example of: [p52]
a. using a process morpheme to
create a noun from a verb
b. using a form morpheme to
create a noun from a verb
c. adding a free morpheme to
create a process
d. a compound word
In English, emphasizing or
“stressing” the first syllable of the
word subject instead of the second
syllable, is an example of: [p52]
* using a process morpheme to
create a noun from a verb
What types of signs differ in their
movement but share the same
handshape, location, and
orientation? [p52]
a. compound pairs
b. noun-verb pairs
c. form morphemes
d. cheremes
What types of signs differ in their
movement but share the same
handshape, location, and
orientation? [p52]
* noun-verb pairs
The process of repetition is called:
[p54]
a. affixation
b. compounding
c. lexicalization
d. reduplication
The process of repetition is called:
[p54]
* reduplication
The process of adding bound
morphemes to other forms to
create new units is called: [p54]
a. affixation
b. compounding
c. lexicalization
d. attachment
The process of adding bound
morphemes to other forms to
create new units is called: [p54]
* affixation
The use of affixation in ASL would
result in the creation of a: [p54]
a. form morpheme
b. process morpheme
c. lexicalized sign
d. reduplicated sign
The use of affixation in ASL would
result in the creation of a: [p54]
* form morpheme
Noun-verb pairs provide an
example of: [p54]
a. creation of a form morpheme
b. creation of a process morpheme
c. lexicalized signs
d. compounding
Noun-verb pairs provide an
example of: [p54]
* creation of a process morpheme
The creation of a new word by
combining two free morphemes is
called: [p56]
a. noun-verb pairing
b. affixation
c. incorporation
d. compounding
The creation of a new word by
combining two free morphemes is
called: [p56]
* compounding
The first contact rule applies to:
[p57]
a. nonmanual markers
b. compounds
c. determiners
d. the weak hand
The first contact rule applies to:
[p57]
* b. compounds
When compounds are made in
ASL, internal movement or the
repetition of movement is
eliminated. This principle is called:
[p58]
a. topicalization
b. reciprocity
c. The single sequence rule
d. segmenting
When compounds are made in
ASL, internal movement or the
repetition of movement is
eliminated. This principle is called:
[p58]
* The single sequence rule
When a right handed signer signs
the concept “BELIEVE,” (which is
made up from the signs “THINK”
and “MARRY”) his left hand is
formed into a “C” handshape while
the right hand is signing “THINK.”
This is an example of: [p58]
a. weak hand anticipation rule
b. reciprocity
c. The simple sequence rule
d. prediction rule
When a right handed signer signs
the concept “BELIEVE,” (which is
made up from the signs “THINK”
and “MARRY”) his left hand is
formed into a “C” handshape while
the right hand is signing “THINK.”
This is an example of: [p58]
* weak hand anticipation rule
Movement epenthesis, hold
deletion, and assimilation are what
kind of rules? [p59]
a. Morphological rules
b. Phonological rules
c. Syntactic rules
d. Pragmatic rules
Movement epenthesis, hold
deletion, and assimilation are what
kind of rules? [p59]
* Phonological rules
The first contact rule, the single
sequence rule, and the weak hand
anticipation rule are what kind of
rules [p57]
a. morphological rules
b. phonological rules
c. syntactic rules
d. pragmatic rules
The first contact rule, the single
sequence rule, and the weak hand
anticipation rule are what kind of
rules [p57]
* morphological rules
In the compound sign THINKSAME, a movement segment is
added between the final hold of
THINK and the first movement of
SAME. This is an example of: [p59]
a. the simple sequence rule
b. assimilation
c. movement epenthesis
d. weak hand anticipation
In the compound sign THINKSAME, a movement segment is
added between the final hold of
THINK and the first movement of
SAME. This is an example of: [p59]
* movement epenthesis
When two signs are compounded,
the noncontact holds between
movements are eliminated. This
principle is: [p41 & p59]
a. the simple sequence rule
b. assimilation
c. hold deletion
d. movement epenthesis
When two signs are compounded,
the noncontact holds between
movements are eliminated. This
principle is: [p41 & p59]
* hold deletion
If I do the sign BELIEVE, and at the
beginning of the sign my right hand
forms on somewhat of a “C”
handshape (rather than the typical
“1” handshape) what is taking
place? [p59]
a. assimilation
b. sloppy signing
c. accommodation
d. contamination
If I do the sign BELIEVE, and at the
beginning of the sign my right hand
forms on somewhat of a “C”
handshape (rather than the typical
“1” handshape) what is taking
place? [p59]
* assimilation
LOOK and STRONG come together
(compound) to form the sign: [p59]
a. "believe"
b. "remember"
c. "far sighted"
d. "resemble"
LOOK and STRONG come together
(compound) to form the sign: [p59]
* "resemble"
What is the study of the
smallest contrastive parts of
language that do not have
independent meaning? [p49]
a. phonology
b. morphology
c. dactylology
d. lexicostatistics
What is the study of the
smallest contrastive parts of
language that do not have
independent meaning? [p49]
* phonology
Download

Powerpoint: Linguistics-5ed-p56-