Paper
Content
Reading
(1 h 15’)
4 parts/34 questions
Writing
(1 h 30’)
Speaking
(15’ per pair of
candidates)
20%
20%
2 parts
Use of English
5 parts/50 questions
(1 hour)
Listening
(about 40’)
Marks
(% of
total)
Shows you can deal confidently with different types of text,
such as fiction, newspapers and magazines.
You create two different pieces of writing, such as articles,
essays, letters, proposals, reports and reviews.
20%
Tests your use of English with different types of exercise that
show how well you can control your grammar and vocabulary.
20%
Tests your ability to follow and understand a range of spoken
materials, such as interviews, radio broadcasts,
presentations, talks and everyday conversations.
4 parts/30 questions
20%
4 parts
Purpose
Tests your ability to communicate effectively in face-to-face
situations. You will take the Speaking test with another
candidate.
What I wear to work
Gayle Mellor (31), Modern Languages teacher
We don’t have a dress code as such. The male the younger one giggle about it, which is harmless
teachers wear ties, but there is a really diverse enough. Then you occasionally eavesdrop on the
approach to smart style amongst the female staff. older girls doing a hard-hitting TV-style commentary
Respect comes from body language and behaviour on what the staff are wearing, which can be
ratherthantheclothesyouwear,butofcoursecertain unnerving. But the popular stereotype of teachers
things would be deemed inappropriate, and I’ve got wearing hard-wearing materials like corduroy only
noproblemwiththat.It’s not mychoiceofoutfitthat makesmelaugh,becauseIloveit!Sometimes,ifolder
puts me in the mood for work, because I wear my pupils like something you wear, they’ll ask where it’s
work clothes socially as well, but when I pick up my from,whichcancontributetobreakingdownbarriers.
bigsatchel,Icanfeelmyselfgoinginto‘teachermode’ If you asked my colleagues, they’d say sky blue skirts
becauseit’s gotallmystuffinit.
have become a bit of a signature for me. Not that I
What you wear as a teacher does impact on your mind,becausemywardrobeisbuiltaroundstylesand
relationshipwiththepupilsthough,especiallythegirls. coloursthatIfeelmostcomfortablein,andIwouldn’t
changethat.
Ifwewearjeansonnon-teachingdays,
1 What point does Gayle make about the
clothes she wears for teaching?
A They should put her in the right frame
of mid for work.
B She needs to dress smartly if she is to
keep her pupils’ respect.
C Following fashion helps her to
understand her pupils’ attitudes better.
D There are limits to the range of clothes
that she considers suitable.
2 Gayle sometimes feels slightly
uncomfortable when
A people can tell she is a teacher from her
clothes.
B younger pupils find her clothes amusing
keep her pupils’ respect.
C pupils criticise their teachers’ clothes.
D people associate her with one
particular style of clothes.
7
G
8
E
You are going to read a newspaper article. For questions 13-19, choose the answer
(A, B, C or D) which you think fits best according to the text. Mark your answers on
a separate answer sheet.
BRIDGES
The Bosphorus Bridge in Istanbul links Europe to Asia. If you are standing in the middle of it,
then what continent are you in? No, it’s not a brainteaser with a quick answer; it’s a question
which hints at the fact that bridges are more complicated things than mere ways of getting
from A to B. Dr lain Borden researches psychological aspects of architecture at London
University. ‘Unlike going through a doorway, crossing a bridge takes time. While you are
corssing the bridge, you are in neither one place nor the other but in a strange kind of limbo
state,’ he explains.
It may sound a little far-fetched, but Dr Borden’s view is tapping into our fundamental
responses to the physical world around us. The Ancient Britons attached great spiritual
significance to rivers and certainly appreciated this concept of limbo. Recently a team from
the Museum of London excavated the remains of the oldest bridge found so far in Britain
(about 3,500 years old), in central London. In those days the River Thames was merely a
collection of shallow channels and small islands. These islands had enormous spiritual
resonance as places separated from shores and connected to the river. But it is still true
today that bridges are more than utilitarian structures and have a great symbolic impact.
13 What point is the writer making in the first paragraph?
A Bridges have a significance beyond their basic physical
function.
B The impact of a bridge varies from county to country.
C The popular view of what bridges represent has changed.
D People have different reactions when crossing a bridge.
You are going to read a magazine article about the rock band Franz Ferdinand
and its website. For questions 20-34, choose from the sections (A-E). The
sections may be chosen more than once.
Which section mentions the following?
positive reviews of the band’s musical output
21
A
The shortcomings of some websites featuring other bands
22
B
A
B
Inearly2004,therockgroupFranzFerdinandgottheirfirst
bigbreakwhentheirsecondsingle‘TakeMeOut’reached
theBritishTop10.Ayearlater,theywerecollectingawards
for the best rock act and the best British band, having
gained both critical and popular acclaim for their debut
album, and set up their own website. Indeed, Franz
Ferdinandandtheirmanagementattributedtheirsuccess
to more than sharp haircuts, natty outfits and the songs
themselves. They believe that while their success was in
part due to the tired-and-tested marketing techniques
thatmakeanewband–touringthemusicvenues,relying
on the build-up of business by word-of-mouth and
convincingradiostationstoplaytheirstuff–itwasalsodue
innosmallparttotheinternet.
Eversincethewebbecameamass-marketphenomenonin
the late 1990s, record labels had largely been using it as just
another marketing tool. For their biggest acts, they would
build hugely expensive sites that acted as little more than
moving billboards, leaving everything else to fan sites. Franz
Ferdinandweredifferent.Theywereamongstanewwaveof
popular bands who used the medium to bridge the gap
between themselves and their fans. Groups like Radiohead
started the trend, allowing internet users to watch them in
the studio and share their innermost thoughts via online
diaries. Franz Ferdinand took things a step further. They
regularly appeared on their own message boards, chatting
indiscriminately to fans and posting diary entries and photos
fromwherevertheywereintheworld,usingtheirowndigital
cameras,microphonesandlaptops.Allfourgroupmembers
had access to the site’s content-management system,
makingiteasyforthemtoupdateitthemselves.
Paper 2 WRITING (1 hour 20 minutes)
Part 1
For questions 1-12, read the text below and decide which answer (A, B,
C or D) best fits each gap. There is an example at the beginning (0).
For questions 13-27, read the text below and think of the word which best
fits each gap. Use only one word in each gap. There is an example at the
beginning.
(13) Unlike
(14) Which
(15) From
(16) To
(17) due/owing/thanks
(18) unless/before/until
For questions 28-37, read the text below. Use the word given in capitals at
the end of some of the lines to form a word that fits in the gap in the
same line. There is an example at the beginning (0).
(28) ACCESSIBLE
(29) PASSIONATELY
For questions 38-42, think of one word only which can be used
appropriately in all three sentences. Here is an example (0).
covered
covered
covered
false
false
false
(38) COVERED
(39) FALSE
For questions 43-50, complete the second sentences so that it has a
similar meaning to the first sentence, using the word given. Do not
change the word given. You must use between three and six words,
including the word given. Here’s an example (0)
failed to realize the importance
is believed to have been
You will hear three different extracts. For questions 1 ─ 6, choose the
answer (A, B or C) which fits best according to what you hear. There are
two questions for each extract. You hear two people on a music
programme talking about the singer Nancy Graham.
1
What is the man’s opinion of Nancy’s second album?
A He thinks it is very experimental.
B He appreciates the continuity of style.
C He wonders if she is lacking inspiration.
2
What do the two speakers agree about?
A the freshness of the music
B the lack of real emotion in the music
C the calming effect of the music on the listener
You will hear a marine wildlife photographer called Bruce Hind talking
about his work. For questions 7 ─ 14, complete the sentences.
MARINE WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHER
Bruce says that
aspect of his work.
PLANNING
Before going on a trip, Bruce makes
the photographs he hopes to take.
7
is the most important
DRAWINGS
8
of
You will hear part of a radio interview in which the comedian and writer
Jane Clarkson is talking about her work. For questions 15 ─ 20, choose the
answer (A, B, C or D) which fits best according to what you hear.
15 What did Jane find difficult about writing a book?
A She couldn’t travel around the country.
B She didn’t get any instant reaction to her work.
C She had to spend time looking after her daughter.
D She found the process itself very challenging.
16 What do the two speakers agree about?
A They didn’t think the book was funny.
B They were dismissive of her initial success.
C They thought her male colleagues were better writers.
D They thought she should stick to being a comedian.
You will hear five short extracts in which people are talking about keeping fit.
TASK ONE
TASK TWO
For questions 21 ─ 25, choose from the list
(A ─ H) the person who is speaking.
For questions 26 ─ 30, choose from the list (A ─ H)
what each speaker is expressing.
While you listen you must complete both tasks.
A an artist
B a fitness instructor
C a sales manager
Speaker 1
B 21
Speaker 2
G 22
Speaker 3
C 23
Speaker 4
A 24
Speaker 5
E 25
D a childminder
E a doctor
F an office cleaner
G a secretary
H a retired person
A a pride in personal
achievements
B indifference to current trends
C an enjoyment of a daily routine
D a commitment to taking regular
exercise
E a desire to improve his or her
diet
F awareness of his or her health
problems
G a reluctance to admit failure
H resentment of another person’s
attitude
Speaker 1
C 26
Speaker 2
H 27
Speaker 3
F
Speaker 4
D 29
Speaker 5
B 30
28
The examiner asks questions and you may have to give information
about your interests, studies, careers, etc.
Examples of questions in Part 1:
• What is the one thing you own that you
couldn’t live without? (Why?)
• How important is it to share the same
musical tastes as your friends? (Why?/
Why not?)
• What do you think you’ll be doing in five
years’ time?
Candidate A:
• What difficulties might the photographers be having?
• Who might be interested in the photographs they are taking?
Question for Candidate B:
• Which of the photographs being taken would be the most interesting?
Candidate B
• How might the people be feeling?
• What might have caused them to be feeling like this?
Question for Candidate A:
• Which picture shows the strongest emotion?
• What hopes and fears for the future might each chapter include?
• Which chapter might interest readers most?
A discussion on topics related to Part 3, e.g.:
• Are television programmes more
effective then books in dealing with
topics like our hopes and fears for the
future? (Why? Why not?)
• Is it important for parents to read to
their children? (Why? Why not?)
Slide 2
Useful links:
http://www.cambridgeenglish.org/exams-and-qualifications/advanced/
https://www.teachers.cambridgeesol.org/ts/exams/generalenglish/advanced/a
dviceforteachers
http://www.flo-joe.co.uk/cae/students/index.htm
Slide 4 - The Reading paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
1
Content
Task focus
Candidates are expected to show
Three texts on one theme
understanding of attitude, detail,
from a range of sources.
implication, main idea, opinion, purpose,
Each text has two
specific information, text organisation
multiple-choice questions.
features, tone and text structure.
Slide 5 - The Reading paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the exam)
contains 4 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
2
A text from which six
paragraphs have been
removed and placed in a
jumbled order, together with
an additional paragraph, after
the text.
Candidates are expected to show
understanding of attitude, detail,
implication, main idea, opinion,
purpose, specific information, text
organisation features, tone and text
structure.
Slide 6 - The Reading paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the exam)
contains 4 parts.
Part
3
Content
Task focus
A text followed by seven
multiple-choice questions.
Candidates are expected to show
understanding of attitude, detail,
implication, main idea, opinion,
purpose, specific information, text
organisation features, tone and text
structure.
Slide 7 - The Reading paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the exam)
contains 4 parts.
Part
4
Content
Task focus
A text or several short texts
preceded by 15 multiplechoice questions.
Candidates are expected to show
understanding of attitude, detail,
implication, main idea, opinion,
purpose, specific information, text
organisation features, tone and text
structure.
Slide 9 - The Writing paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the exam)
contains 2 parts.
Part
1
Content
Task focus
Candidates are expected to be able to write nonspecialised text types such as an article, a contribution
One
to a longer piece, an essay, information sheets, a letter, a
compulsory
proposal, a report, a review, or a competition entry, with
question.
a focus on advising, comparing, evaluating, expressing
opinions, hypothesizing, justifying and persuading.
Slide 13 - The Writing paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 2 parts.
Part
2
Content
Task focus
Candidates are expected to be able to write nonCandidates choose
specialised text types such as an article, a
one task from a
contribution to a longer piece, an essay,
choice of five
information sheets, a letter, a proposal, a report,
questions
a review, or a competition entry, with a focus on
(including the set
advising, comparing, evaluating, expressing
question options).
opinions, hypothesizing, justifying and
persuading.
Slide 14 - If candidates have read one of the set books and want to
write about it, they may decide to try Question 5. You have a choice of
two tasks, 5(a) or 5(b), for this question.
Slide 16 - The Use of English paper (worth 20% of the total marks for
the exam) contains 5 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
1
A modified cloze test containing
twelve gaps and followed by
twelve multiple-choice
questions.
Candidates are expected to
demonstrate the ability to apply
their knowledge of the language
system.
Slide 17 - The Use of English paper (worth 20% of the total marks for
the exam) contains 5 parts.
Part
2
Content
Task focus
A modified open cloze test
containing fifteen gaps.
Candidates are expected to
demonstrate the ability to apply
their knowledge of the language
system.
Slide 18 - The Use of English paper (worth 20% of the total marks for
the exam) contains 5 parts.
Part
3
Content
Task focus
A text containing ten gaps. Each gap
Candidates are expected to
corresponds to a word. The stems of
demonstrate the ability to apply
the missing words are given beside
their knowledge of the
the text and must be changed to
language system.
form the missing word.
Slide 19 - The Use of English paper (worth 20% of the total marks for
the exam) contains 5 parts.
Part
4
Content
Task focus
Five questions, each one containing
three discrete sentences. Each
Candidates are expected to
sentence contains one gap, which demonstrate the ability to apply
must be completed with one word
their knowledge of the
which is appropriate in all three
language system.
sentences.
Slide 20 - The Use of English paper (worth 20% of the total marks for
the exam) contains 5 parts.
Part
5
Content
Task focus
Eight separate questions, each with
Candidates are expected to
a lead-in sentence and a gapped
demonstrate the ability to apply
second sentence to be completed in
their knowledge of the
three to six words, one of which is a
language system.
given ‘key-word’.
Slide 22 - The Listening paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
1
Content
Task focus
Candidates are expected to be
able to show understanding of
Three short extracts, from exchanges
agreement , attitude, course of
between interacting speakers. There
action, detail, feeling, function,
are two multiple-choice questions
gist, interpreting context, main
for each extract.
points, opinion, purpose,
specific information etc.
Slide 23 - The Listening paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
2
A monologue with a
sentence completion
task which has eight
items.
Candidates are expected to be able to show
understanding of agreement , attitude,
course of action, detail, feeling, function,
gist, interpreting context, main points,
opinion, purpose, specific information etc
Slide 24 - The Listening paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
3
Content
Task focus
Candidates are expected to be able to show
A text involving
understanding of agreement , attitude,
interacting speakers,
course of action, detail, feeling, function,
with six multiple-choice
gist, interpreting context, main points,
questions.
opinion, purpose, specific information etc
Slide 25 - The Listening paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
4
Five short themed
dialogues, with ten
multiple-matching
questions.
Candidates are expected to be able to show
understanding of agreement , attitude,
course of action, detail, feeling, function,
gist, interpreting context, main points,
opinion, purpose, specific information etc
Slide 27 - The Speaking paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts. (Two/three candidates and two examiners)
Part
1
Content
Task focus
A conversation between
General
the interlocutor and each
interactional and
candidate
social language.
(spoken questions).
Timing
3 min.
Slide 28 - The Speaking paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
Timing
2
An individual “long turn” or
each candidate, with a brief
response from the second
candidate (visual stimuli,
with spoken instructions)
Organising a larger piece of
discourse; comparing,
describing, expressing
opinions, speculating.
3 min.
Rubric for Part 2:
Candidate A
It’s your turn first. Here are your pictures. They show photographers
working in different situations. I’d like you to compare two of the
pictures, and say what difficulties the photographers might be having,
and who might be interested in the photographs they are taking.
Candidate B
Which of the photographs being taken would be the most interesting?
(Why?)
Slide 29 - The Speaking paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
Content
Task focus
Timing
2
An individual “long turn” or
each candidate, with a brief
response from the second
candidate (visual stimuli,
with spoken instructions)
Organising a larger piece of
discourse; comparing,
describing, expressing
opinions, speculating.
3 min.
Rubric for Part 2:
Candidate B
Now here are your pictures. They show people expressing different
emotions. I’d like you to compare two of the pictures, and say how the
people might be feeling, and what might have caused them to feel like
this.
Candidate A
Which picture shows the strongest emotion? (Why?
Slide 30 - The Speaking paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
3
Content
Task focus
A two-way
Sustaining an interaction;
conversation between exchanging ideas, expressing and
the candidates (visual
justifying opinions, agreeing
and written stimuli,
and/or disagreeing, suggesting,
with spoken
speculating, evaluating, reaching a
instructions).
decision through negotiation etc.
Timing
4 min.
Rubric for Part 3:
Now, I’d like you to talk about something together for about three
minutes. Here are some pictures illustrating the chapters of a book
called ‘Hopes and Fears for the Future’. First, talk to each other about
what hopes and fears for the future each chapter might include. Then
decide which chapter might interest readers most. All right?
Slide 31 - The Speaking paper (worth 20% of the total marks for the
exam) contains 4 parts.
Part
4
Content
Task focus
A discussion on topics
Expressing and justifying opinions,
related to Part 3
agreeing and/or disagreeing.
(spoken questions).
Timing
4 min.