HTCC Student Research Conference
Information Session
Fall 2012
Honors Transfer Council of California
(HTCC)
Student Research Conference
at UC Irvine Student Center
Saturday, March 23, 2013
8:30-4:30
What: HTCC (Honors Transfer Council of
California) Student Research
Conference
• Who: Community college Honors students and other high-performing
students
• Where: UC Irvine
• When: Saturday, March 23, 2013
• Formats:
– Oral Presentations (12-minute individual; 20-minute small group or 40minute large group)
– Poster Presentations (individual or group)
– Creative Performances
• Deadlines: Dec. 3, 2012: 250-word proposal abstract due to Honors
Program Director
• Awards: Several Poster and abstract awards, $50-$1000; publication
opportunity
• Conference Website: http://www.honorstcc.org
Benefits of Research
• Improving communication, leadership skills, and
problem-solving skills
• Strengthening applications for potential scholarships
• Boosting resumé
• Gathering new knowledge
• Clarifying career and academic goals/interests
• Learning the methods of your field
• Entering your field's professional dialogue
• Developing lifelong professional and academic
connections
Conference Website
• http://www.honorstcc.org/conference/index.htm
l
• Consult website for conference information and
for tips on writing abstracts and creating effective
presentations, poster guidelines, sample
abstracts and posters, etc.
• Dr. Ryals will submit all student applications to
the conference.
• Note: IVC has internal deadlines that differ from
the deadlines listed on the conference website.
Special Opportunities
• HTCC Awards/Scholarships
1. Poster Awards:
• Cash prizes: 1st, 2nd, 3rd in both Humanities/Social
Sciences and Physical/Life Sciences categories.
• 1st place: $500; 2nd place: $250; 3rd place: $100.
• To apply: Awards are based on poster displays;
no additional abstract needed once admitted to
conference; all poster exhibits are automatically
entered into the competition.
2. Competition Abstract Awards:
• HTCC Outstanding Abstract Awards (up to 5
@ $500)
• HTCC Director’s Award ([email protected] $1000)
• To apply: Requires an additional 400-word
abstract due to Dr. Ryals in February, as well
as attendance at the conference. Only oral
presentation participants are eligible for
abstract awards.
3. UCI Research Grants:
Through the Undergraduate Research Opportunities Program
(UROP), UCI is offering up to four research grants to students
who present papers at the conference and subsequently
undertake research as students at UCI. Selection is based on
the quality of the student abstracts, with up to a total of two
grants for each of four major academic categories:
humanities, mathematics, science, social sciences.
• To apply: Presenters transferring to UCI next year are
eligible for UCI Grant awards. Requires submission of a
400-word abstract to Dr. Ryals by February for either a
poster or oral presentation and participation at the
conference. Receipt of the UCI Grant is contingent upon
actual transfer to UCI. If you plan to transfer to UCI and
are interested in a UCI grant, please see Dr. Ryals.
• Publication Opportunity
All 250-word research proposals for poster or
oral presentations accepted to the conference
will automatically be considered for publication
in the conference booklet, Building Bridges,
which comes out following the conference.
Students may have only one abstract published.
HTCC Application Forms
UCI Research Conference
Honors Transfer Council of California
Saturday, March 23rd, 2013
Submission Information and Deadlines
To apply for the 2013 HTCC Student Research Conference, you must do the following:
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Attend an information session about the conference.
Submit an electronic copy of the “HTCC Application Form” below to
[email protected] by Monday, December 3, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.
• Submit a hard copy of the “Research Authentication Form” to the Honors Office
(Room A209) by Monday, December 3, 2012 at 5:00 p.m.
• A separate HTCC Application Form and Research Authentication Form must be
submitted for each student proposal.
• Forms available on Honors Program Website:
http://ivc.edu/academics/honors/Pages/default.aspx
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HTCC APPLICATION FORM
Submit the following electronically by December 3, 2012 at 5:00 p.m. to [email protected]
Applicant Information:
Name:
______________________________________________
Cell Phone: ______________________________________________
Email:
______________________________________________
Major:
______________________________________________
Faculty Mentor Information:
Name:
______________________________________________
IVC Phone:
______________________________________________
Email:
______________________________________________
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Presentation Type (check the appropriate category):
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___Small Group Oral Presentation (2 presenters: 20 minutes for talk, 10 for discussion)
___Individual Oral Presentation (12 minutes for talk, 5 for discussion)
Other presenter:
Name__________________________________
Email________________________
___Large Group Oral Presentation (3 or more presenters: 40 minutes for talk, 10 for discussion)
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Other presenters:
Name__________________________________
Email________________________
Name__________________________________
Email________________________
Name__________________________________
Email________________________
Name__________________________________
Email________________________
___Creative Performance (12 min. for presentation, 5 for discussion)
___Poster Display
Research Disciplines (HTCC categories)
Humanities
___Art History
___Languages / Literature
___Philosophy / Religion
___History
___Communications / Rhetoric
___Humanities / General
___Film Studies
Sciences
___Mathematics
___Physics / Astronomy
___Earth Sciences
___Chemistry
___Biology
___Sciences / General
Social Sciences
___Psychology
___Anthropology
___Sociology
___Economics
___Political Science
___Social Sciences / General
Fine Arts
___ Music
___Theatre
___Readings / Poetry
___Dance
___Graphic Arts
___Fine Arts / General
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RESEARCH ABSTRACT:
Catchy and Informative Title
25-Word Abstract
This short abstract is a very brief identification of your topic. If your submission is
accepted, it will be placed into the Conference Program. The short abstract may
be a sentence taken from the 250-word abstract.
250-Word Abstract
In this abstract, you will provide a brief summary of your research
project/presentation, including the main argument that you will make along with
some mention of key points of evidence and in-text citations as needed.
Works Cited List
MLA-formatted Works Cited containing at least 5 authoritative sources.
See the conference website for abstract guidelines and sample abstracts:
http://www.honorstcc.org/conference/index.html
RESEARCH AUTHENTICATION FORM
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A hard copy of this form must be submitted to the Honors Office in Room A209B by December 3,
2012, in order for the student to be eligible to participate in the 2013 HTCC Student Research
Conference. Other materials should be submitted electronically by December 3, 2012. (Please
add additional places for signatures below as needed.)
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Student Verification (multiple signatures required for group presentations)
I confirm that my HTCC abstract entitled ________________________________________ reflects
my own work and my own writing and that I have documented all words and evidence taken from
research sources.
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
Research Authentication Form (cont.)
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Faculty Mentor Verification (multiple mentors acceptable)
I confirm that I have worked with the student(s) above on this research project and proposal
abstract.
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
I confirm that I have worked with the student(s) above on this research project and proposal
abstract.
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
I confirm that I have worked with the student(s) above on this research project and proposal
abstract.
Signature ______________________________________
Date ____________
Function of Faculty Mentor
The faculty mentor should guide your research in
the following ways:
• Help you define your research question;
• Aid you in designing a research methodology that
is appropriate for your topic and your discipline;
• Help you locate relevant research materials;
• Assist you with writing your proposal and
practicing your presentation.
• Because different disciplines have different
protocols, working with a faculty mentor in the
appropriate field is essential to ensure sound and
ethical research.
What research topics are acceptable?
• This research conference is multidisciplinary,
so topics in all academic areas are welcome,
including the following: Business Sciences;
Fine Arts; Humanities and Languages;
Kinesiology, Health, and Athletics; Math,
Computer Science, and Engineering; Physical
and Biological Sciences; Social and Behavioral
Sciences.
Getting Started: Looking for topics
• Course projects and papers
• Newspapers, magazines, conversations
• Think about what interests you
1) People
2) Historical Event
3) Psychological Phenomenon
4) Cultural Product (e.g. Artworks)
5) Natural Phenomenon (e.g. volcano eruption)
6) Social Issues or Events (e.g. government
policy)
7) Business Techniques and Methods
8) Problems from your daily life
Getting Started: Literature Review
• Okay to begin w/Google Search on topics of
interest but also spend quality time researching
and reading the relevant literature in your field
• In most cases—particularly as topic becomes
more defined—rely on published, peer-reviewed
scholarly journals and articles, not textbooks or
websites
• Make use of your librarian and your professors to
access scholarly materials
• Knowing the literature that exists on your topic
will help you to formulate a relevant, interesting
research question and proposal
Getting Started: Faculty Mentorship
• Faculty mentors can play a crucial role in helping
you to define a topic
• Find a faculty mentor for your project, ideally
someone who is an expert in the discipline(s) in
which your topic falls: does not have to be
someone with whom you’ve taken a class
• Do some preliminary research so that you have
ideas when you approach the faculty member,
but also ask for help brainstorming and refining
your topic
• Use proper etiquette in approaching faculty
Getting Started: Consider Purpose
Research and research presentations can have several goals,
including the following. Considering your purpose can help to
frame and delimit your project. Some common purposes
include
• To review what is known about a topic (literature review)
• To lay out the terms/sides of a debate
• To understand, explain, and illustrate an issue or
phenomenon
• To test a hypothesis
• To solve a problem
• To advance an argument or interpretation
• To show the potential implications of an idea, a
phenomenon, etc.
Sample Topics: (from 2011 HTCC Conference)
• Literature and Film
– The Theme of Fatherhood in Autobiographical Graphic Novels
– Eccentricity and the Genius Detective
– Blood, Sex, and Consequences: The Violent Origins of Fairy
Tales
– A Rose Is Not Always a Rose: A Freudian Analysis of the Film
American Beauty
– Beyond the Whitewash: The Purpose of Memory in Beloved
and Its Impact on History
– The Most Dangerous Time to be Ill: Medicine in Pride and
Prejudice
– Beautiful Work: The Product of a Series of Destructive Events
in the Life of Edgar Allan Poe
– The Monster of Venice: Examining the Importance of Historical
Context when Analyzing Shakespeare's Plays
• Art History
– Surrealism: A Cultural Impetus
– Emotional Truth as Social Protest: An Analysis of
Goya's The Third of May 1808
• Philosophy-Religion
– The Problem of Natural Evil: Objections to the
Free Will Theodicy
– Moral Absolutism vs. Moral Skepticism
– Human Perception of the Flood in the Ancient
Near East
• History
– The Menace of Free Trade: Costs and
Consequences of the Forced Opening of 19th
Century China
– Libraries That Changed the World: Alexandria
and Toledo
– Transvestites, Naughty Nurses, and Slave
Impersonators: How Women Helped Win the
Civil War
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Economics
– Technology and Economic Growth in Japan 2005-2008
– Looking Back After the Storm: The IMF and the 1997 Asian Financial Crisis
Psychology
– The Impact of Slang on Self-Esteem
– The Impact of Depression Among Athletes
– Born To Be Mild: What Your Beliefs Surrounding Birth-Order Effects Say
about You
– The Manifestation of Bipolar Affective Disorder Post Brain Injury
– Socially Awkward: A Look Into the Alienation and Efforts to Assimilate by
People with Asperger’s Disorder
Anthropology
– Anthropological Analysis of the Parkour Culture: A Video Ethnography
– The Need for Enrichment in Captive Primate Populations
Sociology
– The Handshake Brings Down the Company: How Nonverbal Communication
Creates Challenges in International Business and Its Solutions
– Rave Culture of the Modern American Youth and Its Psychological Aspects
• Biology
– An Examination of the Effects of Organic Pesticides
on Plant Health
– The Effects of Ultraviolet Radiation on Yeast
Screened by Plant Pigments and Antioxidants
• Earth Sciences
– Ecological Prostitution: Water's Role in the American
Southwest
– Ocean Acidification
• Sciences-General
– The Effects of the Built Environment on Health in
America
Writing the Abstract
What is an abstract?
• A brief summary of your research
• Includes
– Original and informative title
– Research topic, question, hypothesis, and/or
purpose
– Research methods used or anticipated
– Implications or conclusions drawn or anticipated
HTCC Abstract Guidelines
• Note: Abstract guidelines often differ from
conference to conference
• For HTCC:
– 250-words
– 1-3 paragraphs
– Minimum 5 scholarly sources
– Also some evidence, in-text citations
– Works Cited (MLA Format)
Presenter: Eunice Kim, Irvine Valley College
Mentor: Professor Brenda Borron
Title: A Magical Shortcut Does Not Exist: The Importance of Total Immersion in Language Acquisition in
Study Abroad Context
With English fluency a major factor in university admissions and employment offers in South Korea,
many Korean students spend time abroad in English-speaking countries in order to learn English (Cho).
Students often believe that English proficiency is proportional to the length of residence. However, a simple
cause-and-effect relationship does not exist between residence and fluency. Rather, total immersion in the
language entailing intensive practice is the key to language acquisition (Wayne). Where total immersion
occurs during time abroad, students tend to make impressive progress, while distractions from immersion
lead to unsatisfactory results (West).
Unfortunately, many Korean students living in the popular study-abroad destination of California find
total immersion difficult to achieve (Carney). The large non-English- speaking Korean population in the region,
coupled with infrequent opportunities to interact with local American students, reinforces Korean students’
propensity to insulate themselves from native speakers, thus inhibiting their ability to learn English.
In order to facilitate immersion, students need to overcome the temptations to socialize within the
familiar group of Koreans, and instead venture to interact with Americans, exposing themselves to the
English-speaking environment (Carney; Medina). By participating in diverse social activities such as campus
clubs and volunteer organizations, students can make local acquaintances and partake of cultural practices. In
addition, through Internet social-networking services such as Facebook, students can continually interact with
their new friends while practicing English. Also, residing with local American families can maximize students’
daily involvement with English in real-life contexts. While a magical shortcut for language acquisition does not
exist, intensive immersion combined with individual effort is “the only way to true fluency” (Wayne).
A Closer Look: The Title
Catchy Primary Title
A Magical Shortcut Does Not Exist: The
Importance of Total Immersion in Language
Acquisition in Study Abroad Context
Informative Subtitle
Paragraph 1 Breakdown
With English fluency a major factor in university
admissions and employment offers in South Korea, many
Korean students spend time abroad in English-speaking
countries in order to learn English (Cho). Students often
believe that English proficiency is proportional to the
length of residence. However, a simple cause-and-effect
relationship does not exist between residence and fluency.
Rather, total immersion in the language entailing intensive
practice is the key to language acquisition (Wayne). Where
total immersion occurs during time abroad, students tend
to make impressive progress, while distractions from
immersion lead to unsatisfactory results (West).
Opening
sentence
provides
context and
relevance
Presents key
research concept
with citation
Paragraph 2 Breakdown
Unfortunately, many Korean students living in the
popular study-abroad destination of California find
total immersion difficult to achieve (Carney). The large
non-English- speaking Korean population in the region,
coupled with infrequent opportunities to interact with
local American students, reinforces Korean students’
propensity to insulate themselves from native
speakers, thus inhibiting their ability to learn English.
Logical break
between
paragraphs;
demonstrates
problem to be
addressed
Paragraph 3 Breakdown
In order to facilitate immersion, students need to
overcome the temptations to socialize within the familiar
group of Koreans, and instead venture to interact with
Americans, exposing themselves to the English-speaking
environment (Carney; Medina). By participating in diverse
social activities such as campus clubs and volunteer
organizations, students can make local acquaintances and
partake of cultural practices. In addition, through Internet
social-networking services such as Facebook, students can
continually interact with their new friends while practicing
English. Also, residing with local American families can
maximize students’ daily involvement with English in real-life
contexts. While a magical shortcut for language acquisition
does not exist, intensive immersion combined with individual
effort is “the only way to true fluency” (Wayne).
Articulates
research
conclusion and
delineates
specific solutions
Effective
concluding
sentence uses
key source and
reiterates
thesis
Works Cited Reminders
Hanging
Indent
Works Cited
Carney, Christina. Personal Interview by Eunice Kim. 01
Dec 2009.
Cho, Joohee. "English Is The Golden Tongue for S.
Koreans; Parents Pay a Fortune so Children Can
Learn." The Washington Post 02 July 2007, final ed.
Web. 25 Mar. 2010.
Medina, Sarah. “Immersion Program.” YouTube. Web. 11
Nov. 2009.
Wayne, Herbert. E-mail Interview by Eunice Kim. 09 Nov
2009.
West, Charlotte. "When One is Not Enough. "
International Educator 18.1 (2009): 18-26. Web. 25
Mar. 2010.
A
Z
Bay Honors Consortium
• What: Bay Honors Consortium
• Who: Community college Honors students and other highperforming students
• Where: Alternates bt. Stanford and Berkeley; (2013:
Stanford)
• When: May, TBD
• Formats:
• Oral Presentations (15-minute individual; 20-minute group)
• Deadlines: February: 150-word proposal abstract
• Award: One award for best abstract
• Conference Website:
http://www.losmedanos.edu/honors/research/info.asp
Follow Through
HTCC Mandatory Informational Workshops
(Attend One)
• Tuesday, November 13, 12:00-1:00 B258
• Tuesday, November 13, 3:00-4:00 B212
• Thursday, November 15, 3:00-4:00 B117
• Friday, November 16, 9:00-10:00 A204
Abstract Workshop and Peer Review Session
• Tuesday, November 27, 11:00-12:00 A305
• Thursday, November 29, 3:00-4:00 B117
Contact honorsp[email protected] with questions.
Other Resources:
National Council on Undergraduate
Research (NCUR)
http://www.ncur.org/ugresearch.htm
Council on Undergraduate Research
(CUR) http://www.cur.org
Download

HTCC Research Workshop Presentation