WIA and Colorado’s
Workforce Centers
March 2011
The Workforce Investment Act of
1998
WIA Programs – Adult, Dislocated Worker,
and Youth
 Adult Education and Literacy Act
Amendments
 Wagner-Peyser Act Amendments and
Other Related Activities
 Rehabilitation Act Amendments
 General Provisions
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WIA Key Concepts
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Managed at the Local Level - Local
Control
There are nine workforce regions in the state
with 11 sub-regions in the Rural Consortium
 Most workforce centers are operated by
counties, but the Rural workforce centers are
operated by the State (with two exceptions).
 Some workforce centers contract WIA
services to community based organizations
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WIA Key Concepts (cont.)
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Local Workforce Investment Boards
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Each workforce region must have a board with
majority business membership and representatives of
education, economic development, labor and
community agencies
Boards provide oversight of the programs and set the
strategic direction for the workforce region
Boards must develop partner agreements with other
providers of workforce services such as Adult Ed, Voc
Rehab, TANF Work Programs, Title V Older Workers,
UI, Carl Perkins/Community Colleges, HUD E&T,
Community Service Block Grant E&T programs.
WIA Key Concepts (cont.)
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One-Stop Centers (workforce centers)
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At least one full-service center must be operated in
each region that offers most employment and
training services in one physical location
Collocated programs most frequently include WIA,
Wagner-Peyser, TAA, VETS, TANF, Employment
First, and others
Centers must provide 24/7 access to all customers
through on-line self-service options:
www.ConnectingColorado.com
Centers must provide access to disabled and limited
English proficiency customers
One-Stop Center Services

Core Services (for all job seekers)
 Access
to computers, copiers, and phones for selfdirected job search (resource centers)
 Job matching and job referrals
 Labor market information
 Work search and work readiness workshops
 One-on-one job search assistance, assessment,
and career guidance services
 Referrals to intensive and training services in the
one-stop and partner agencies
One-Stop Center Services (cont.)

Business Services (for all employers)
 Recruitment
and screening of qualified job
candidates
 Labor market information
 Job fairs and hiring events
 Business roundtables and workshops
 Paid and unpaid work experiences/internships
 On-the-Job training or customized training
contracts
 Participation in SECTORS training grants
One-Stop Center Services (cont.)
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Intensive Services (usually offered to those
eligible for and enrolled in programs or grants)
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In-depth assessment
Counseling and case management
Individual employment plans
Supportive services such as gas vouchers, bus
passes, day care, work clothing and tools
In-depth pre-vocational workshops such as Adult
Basic Education, ESL, and GED preparation
Special services such as tutoring, work experiences,
etc.
One-Stop Center Services (cont.)

Training Services (must be eligible for and
enrolled in a program or grant)
Individual Training Accounts (ITAs) for
classroom training
 On-the-Job Training
 Entrepreneurial Training
 Customized Training
 Access to discretionary grants that offer
training, such as SECTORS grants
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WIA Adult Program (AD)
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Eligibility:
18 or older, citizen or authorized to work
in the US, Selective Service registration
(males 18-25)
Veterans Priority of Service applies
In need of services and can benefit from
the program
Not an entitlement program
WIA Adult Program (AD)
Requirements:
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When funds are limited, regions may invoke
priority of service for low income and other
groups
Sequential delivery of core, intensive, and
training services
Individual Training Accounts or other training
options
12 months of post program follow-up for those
entering employment
Performance outcomes based on entered
employment, employment retention, and
average wage
WIA Dislocated Worker Program
(DW)
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Eligibility:
18 or older, citizen or authorized to work
in the US, Selective Service registration
(males 18-25)
Veterans Priority of Service applies
In need of services and can benefit from
the program
Not an entitlement program; AND
WIA Dislocated Worker Program
(DW)
Eligibility (one of the following)
 Layoff, UI eligible, & unlikely to return to
previous industry or occupation; or
 Substantial layoff or business closure; or
 Loss of self-employment due to economic
downturn or natural disaster; or
 Displaced homemaker; or
 UI Profiled
WIA Dislocated Worker Program
(DW)
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Requirements:
Sequential delivery of core, intensive, and
training services
Individual Training Accounts or other training
options
12 months of post program follow-up for those
entering employment
Performance outcomes based on entered
employment, employment retention, and
average wage
WIA Youth Program (YT)
Eligibility
Ages 14 through 21
 Citizen or authorized to work in the US
 Selective Service registration (males 1825 years of age)
 In need of services and can benefit from
the program/not an entitlement program
 Veterans Priority of Service applies to those
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18 and older; AND
WIA Youth Program (YT)
Eligibility (cont.)
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Low Income AND
One or more of the following:
 Deficient in basic literacy skills
 School dropout
 Homeless, runaway, or foster child
 Pregnant or parenting
 Offender
 Requires additional assistance to complete education
or hold employment (locally defined)
WIA Youth Program (YT)
Eligibility (cont.)

5% Low Income Exemption if the client meets one or more of the
following:
 School dropout
 Basic skills deficient
 Educational attainment 1 or more grades below grade level
appropriate to age
 Pregnant or parenting
 Disabled including learning disabilities
 Homeless or runaway
 Offenders
 Facing serious barriers to employment (locally defined)
WIA Youth Program (YT)
Requirements
Case managers must provide:
Objective assessment
 Development of individual service strategy
(ISS)
 Preparation for post secondary and/or
employment opportunities
 Links to academic and occupational learning
opportunities
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WIA Youth Program (YT)
Requirements (cont.)
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Program operators must procure (or make
available) the following youth program elements:
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Tutoring
Alternative secondary school opportunities
Paid and unpaid work experiences
Summer employment opportunities
Leadership development
Occupational skills training
Supportive Services
Adult Mentoring
12 months of post program follow-up
Comprehensive guidance and counseling
WIA Youth Program (YT)
Requirements (cont.)
30% of more of local WIA Youth funds
must be spent on services to out-of-school
youth
 Performance outcomes based on:

Literacy/Numeracy Gains
 Placement Rate (into employment, military or
post secondary school)
 Attainment of a Degree or Certificate
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WIA Discretionary Grants
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Can be awarded from state level funds or
USDOL national funds (such as the Career
Pathways through Education and Employment
grant that funds your initiative).
Eligibility
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Age, citizen or authorized to work in the US, Selective
Service registration (males 18-25 years of age)
Veterans Priority of Service applies
Additional eligibility factors defined by the grant or
source of funds
Program elements and performance outcomes
defined by grant requirements
How is WIA Funded?
Congress appropriates new funds each
year that are formula-allocated to states by
the US Department of Labor
 The WIA program year is July 1 through
June 30
 Funds are used for 3 years at the state
level, but only 2 years at the local level
 States keep some of the money, but most
funds are formula-allocated to regions
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Statewide WIA Activities
Administered by CDLE
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Layoff Assistance Program
Discretionary grants awarded to workforce
regions and contractors
Program monitoring and fiscal auditing functions
Statewide customer database, program and
financial reporting systems, and eligible training
provider list
Staff that administer special grants from the US
Department of Labor and partner agencies
Complying with the Law
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States must implement a system of monitoring
that insures compliance with all fiscal,
administrative, and programmatic requirements
of:
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WIA – the law and regulations
Federal policies (TEGLs)
OMB Circulars and regulations
State policies (PGLs)
Local policies approved by local boards
Other laws such as those related to employment,
non-discrimination, etc.
Grant specific requirements
What do we know?
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WIA involves the implementation of a statewide
system of one-stop centers offering access to
multiple employment and training programs
WIA requires working with many partners, and it
has a complex set of eligibility, program, fiscal,
and administrative requirements
There is much to learn in order to successfully
implement WIA programs and grants
What additional learning resources
are available?
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www.doleta.gov (laws, regulations, TEGLs –
USDOL policies, and more)
www.workforce3one.org (WIA best practices,
webinars, and more)
www.colorado.gov/CDLE/PGL (state policies)
www.e-colorado.org (portal to access a wide
variety of employment and training resources)
Workforce Development Programs subject
matter experts (Angel Moreno)
Thank You
Nina Holland
Manager Policy and Technical Assistance
CDLE
(303) 318-8806
[email protected]
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(WIA) and Colorado`s Workforce Centers