Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care
Dr. H. Fred Helmholz, Jr, MD
Education Lecture Series
H. Fred Helmholz, Jr., MD
1911-2012
Dr. H. Fred Helmholz MD
Lecturers
 H. Fred Helmholz Jr., MD
 Shelley Mishoe, PhD, RRT
 Jon Nilsestuen, PhD, RRT,
Marilyn Childers, PhD,
RRT, & Stephen Fracek,
PhD
 William Turner, PhD
 Robert Wilkins, PhD, RRT
 Garry Kauffman, MPA,
RRT
 Thomas Johnson, MS,
RRT & Mike Nazarro, MPH,
RRT
www.coarc.com
 Sal Sanders, MS, RRT
 Erna Boone, MEd, RRT &
Bob DeLorme, MS, RRT
 Viva Jo Siddall, MS, RRT
 David Shelledy, PhD, RRT
 Jeff Ward, MEd, RRT
 Joseph Sorbello, MS, RRT
 Mark Taylor, MSW, EdD
 David Vines, MHS, RRT &
Thomas Jones, MEd, RRT
Commission on Accreditation for Respiratory Care
Dr. H. Fred Helmholz, MD
16th Annual Education Lecture
Bill Galvin, MSEd, RRT, CPFT, AE-C, FAARC
“Excellence in Respiratory Care Education:
Creating an Exemplary RC Program”
A Thank You to CoARC Board
•David Bowton, MD, FCCP,
FCCM , Immediate Past President
•Stephen P. Mikles, EdS, RRT,
FAARC, President
•Robert DeLorme, EdS, RRT
•Jolene K. Miller, MEd, RRT ,
Treasurer
•Kathy Rye, EdD, RRT,
FAARC, President-Elect
•Ronald C. Allison, MD
•Charles E. Cowles, Jr., MD
•Joseph P. Coyle, MD
•Diane Flatland, MS, RRT-NPS,
CPFT
•*Tom Smalling , PhD,RPFT,
RPSGT, FAARC – Executive
Director
•Allen N. Gustin, Jr, MD, FCCP,
Secretary
•Thomas Hill, PhD, RRT, FAARC
•Ralph L. Kendall, MD, FCCP
•Diane J. Klepper, MD, FCCP
•Bradley A. Leidich, MSEd, RRT,
FAARC
•Kevin O’Neil, MD
•Pat Munzer, DHSc, RRT,
FAARC
•Monica Schibig, MA, RRT-NPS,
CPFT
•David Shelledy, PhD, RRT,
FAARC
•Gary C. White, MEd, RRT, RPFT
A Thank You to AARC Program
Committee
Cheryl Hoerr, MBA, RRT, FAARC (Chair)
Ira Cheifetz, MD, FAARC
Patrick Dunne, RRT, MEd, FAARC
Dean Hess, PhD, RRT, FAARC
Garry Kauffman, MPA, RRT, FAARC
Timothy Myers, MBA, RRT-NPS
Shawna Strickland, PhD, RRT-NPS, FAARC
Terry Volsko, MHS, RRT, FAARC
Staff Liaison: Doug Laher, RRT, MBA
*KCR
American Association for Respiratory Care
2012 Summer Forum – Santa Fe, NM
July 15, 2012
The Distinguished H.Fred Helmholz,MD Education Lecture
Sponsored by
Committee on Accreditation for Respiratory Care
Excellence in Respiratory Care Education:
Creating an Exemplary RC Program
Presented by
Bill Galvin, MSEd, RRT,CPFT, AE-C,FAARC
Assistant Professor, School of Allied Health Professions
Program Director, Respiratory Care Program
Administrative/ Teaching Faculty, TIPS Program
Gwynedd Mercy College
Conflict of Interest
I have no real or perceived conflict of
interest that relates to this presentation.
I have however published books, chapters
and articles related to this topic for W.B.
Saunders, Elsevier, Delmar/Thompson
Learning, and Jones and Bartlett
Publishers. Any use of brand names is not
in any way meant to be an endorsement of a
specific product, but to merely illustrate a
point of emphasis.
Summer Meetings
2012
Objectives
 List and explain the three key variables that
shape/ impact program development, design
and evaluation
 Review the literature regarding successful
educational programs
 Recognize successful RC programs
 Identify and discuss select variables from
successful RC programs
 Briefly list and explain elements of success
 Identify the single key ingredient to program
and professional success
an obvious starting point is …
a “Systems Approach”
to Education*
inputs
processes
outcomes
Point: simply a conceptual way of viewing
organizations, a management theory for
administering and controlling education
programs
*DeLapp GT. The Systems Approach for Administration of Respiratory Therapy
Education Programs. Respiratory Care. June 1979; vol 24. No.6, 514-520.
A “Systems Approach” to Education
Environment
(Employers/ NBRC/
CoARC)
Inputs
(students)
Processes
(faculty/ RC lab/
clinical/curriculum/
library)
Outcomes
(RRT success
rates/
Employment)
Inputs
• The characteristics, traits, skills, talents,
abilities, experiences and capabilities the
students bring to the program
• Student inputs are generally assessed during
the admissions process where high school
and/or previous college academic performance,
and life experiences are evaluated in form of:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
High school/ college transcripts
Overall GPA
Science GPA
SATs/ACTs
previous life/work experiences
family commitments
work requirements, etc.
Processes
• Represent the sum total of all components that
make up or support the teaching/ learning
activities, to include:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Curriculum
Didactic/clinical faculty
RC Lab
Clinical affiliates
Library
Student services
Computer/ learning lab
Operating budget
• Processes hold a central role or pivotal position
in the system
Outcomes
•
•
The teaching/ learning activities represented by the
curriculum, faculty, lab, clinical, etc (the process)
transforms the student (input) into a caring,
compassionate, and competent RT professional
(outcome)
Outcomes can generally be measured by attainment
of certain standards or desired results, such as:
•
•
•
•
•
•
professional credentialing exams
meaningful, discipline-specific employment
service
a well-rounded liberal arts education
civic responsibility
a contributing member of society
Key points to the “Systems Approach”
Environment
(Employers/ NBRC/
CoARC)
Inputs
(students)
Processes
(faculty/ RC lab/
clinical/curriculum
Outcomes
(RRT success rates/
employment, a
“professional”)
• Components are interrelated
• System is impacted by the external
environment (receiving constant feedback)
• It is dynamic (constantly subject to change)
• It is considered a processor as it exists for
transforming inputs into some altered form
that leaves the system as outputs
clinical sites?
students?
What makes
an RT program
successful ?
faculty?
resources?
curriculum?
program design?
Selective Review of the Literature
From the World of Physical Therapy
• Bkgd & Purpose: examine effect of educational
program characteristics on NPTE pass rates
• Subjects: 132 accredited PT program surveyed –
regression analysis performed on 21 independent
variables and their role in predicting program’s pass
rates
• Results: 3 variables that best predicted pass rate on
NPTE were: (1) accreditation status, (2) number of
faculty with PhD &/or EdD, and (3) years of preprofessional and professional coursework combined
Source: Mohr TM et al. Educational Program Characteristics and
Pass rates on the National Physical Therapy Examination. Journal of
Physical Therapy Education. 2005;vol19,no 1, 60-66.
Selective Review of the Literature
From the World of Physical Therapy
• Bkgd & Purpose: purpose of study was to determine
which factors are related to NPTE score.
• Subjects: 92 alumni of professional Master of PT
program surveyed – Pearson correlation analyses
conducted for following variables: age at graduation,
professional GPA (PGPA), comprehensive exam (CE)
score, PT clinical performance instrument (CPI), and
NPTE score
• Results: CE and Professional GPA were most correlated
with NPTE score
Source: Kosmahl E. Factors Related to Physical Therapist
License Examination Scores. Journal of Physical Therapy
Education. 2005;vol19,no 2, 52-56.
A Selective Review of the Literature
From the World of Physical Therapy
• Bkgd & Purpose: examine relationship between PTA education program
characteristics and PTA graduate pass rates, and develop a model which
includes student and programmatic characteristics to predict success
• Subjects: Program Directors of 50 accredited PTA programs
• Methods: responses were coded and matched with first time and
ultimate pass rates – correlation and regression analysis performed
between pass rates and survey variables
• Results: pass rates of PTA graduates were positively correlated with
newer, public programs, more clinical education credits, and less general
education credits as a % of total credits required for program. Model
best predicting ultimate pass rate success was program inception and
whether institution was public or private
Source: Maring J and Costello, E. Education Program and Student Characteristics
Associated with Pass Rates on the National Physical Therapy Examination for
Physical Therapist Assistants. Journal of Physical Therapy Education.
2009;vol23,no 1, 3-11.
Selective Review of the Literature
From the World of Radiologic Technology
• Bkgd & Purpose: to assess factors registered radiologist
assistants & radiologist assistant students perceive to be the
most significant for success in an RA educational program
• Methods: An electronic survey sent to graduates & currently
enrolled students in RA programs (N-99). Response was 60.6%
and represented 8 RA programs. Factor analysis was used to
examine relationships among variables.
• Results: Four factors accounted for nearly 93% of the variance,
3 of the 4 related to role of radiologist preceptor. Although the
quality of program seemed to be somewhat important, personal
characteristics were perceived as contributing little to student
success.
• Conclusion: Study supports importance of developing strategies
to engage radiologist preceptors in the RA education process.
Source: Ludwig R et al. Factors Influencing Success in RA Programs: A Survey.
Radiologic Technology. 2010;vol82,no 2, 113-123.
Selective Review of the Literature
From the World of Nursing
•
•
•
Fishbone diagram was used as framework for
identification of cause and effect
Eight causative factors were identified & thought to
influence the achievement of its critical program
outcomes (NCLEX-RC pass rates, graduation rates
and graduate and employer satisfaction).
Eight factors were: environment, assessment and
evaluation, standards/ criteria, faculty, students,
resources, program of study, and policies, procedures
and practices.
Brown JF and Marshall, BL. Continuous Quality Improvement: An Effective Strategy for
Improvement of Program Outcomes in a Higher Education Setting. Nursing Education
Perspectives. 2008, Vol 29, No. 4, 205-211
Hallmarks of Excellence
in Nursing Education
(characteristics in the pursuit of excellence)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Students
Faculty
Continuous quality improvement
Curriculum
Teaching/learning evaluations and strategies
Resources
Innovations
Educational resources
Environment
Leadership
Kalb K et al. The Hallmarks Survey: For Those Who Care to Teach the Very
Best. Nursing Education Perspectives. 2008, Jan/Feb, vol 29, no 1, 34-37.
Excellence in Nursing Education Model
-8 core elements-
1. Clear program standards & hallmarks that raise
expectations
2. Evidence-based programs & teaching/evaluation methods
3. Qualified students
4. Quality & adequate resources
5. recognition of expertise
6. Student-centered, interactive, innovative programs &
curricula
7. Well-prepared educational administrators
8. Well-prepared faculty
Source:Engelmann, L et al. Tapping Into Your Center of Excellence. Nursing
Education Perspectives, 2008 Nov/Dec, Vol29, no. 6, p383-385
Selective Review of the Literature
From the Respiratory Care World
Bkgrd & Objective: Study was designed to examine whether a
variance in student and faculty credentials and fiscal expenditures were
associated with program performance on the 1997 CRTT Exam
Methods: 234 accredited college-based respiratory therapist
programs surveyed, 100 (42.7%) returned usable questionnaires
Results: revealed that grade point average of graduates; faculty
credentials; and expenditures for travel, lab supplies, instructional aids,
and electronic media were the strongest predictors to program
effectiveness.
Conclusion: Awareness of the degree and interrelatedness between
program components (student, faculty, curriculum, and resource) and
outcomes contributes to quality program effectiveness.
Source: Johnson, PL. The extent to which factors relevant to program
function influence effectiveness of respiratory care education.
Respiratory Care Education Annual (RESPIR CARE EDUC ANNU), 2001
Spring; 10: 15-32 (41 ref)
Selective Review of the Literature
From the Respiratory Care World
Bkgrd & Objective: Study designed to examined the extent to
which program resources predicted program performance on
WRRT Exam
Methods: analysis of BSRT Programs – 36 our of 57 surveyed
Results: found significant relationship between program
resources and program performance on WRRT Exam
Conclusion: Programs with more financial and personnel resources
consistently have better scores on the WRRTE. Therefore, RCE
programs must assure their constituents that programs have the
financial and personnel resources necessary to provide quality
preparation for graduates
Source: Ari A. A study of program effectiveness: the relationship between
program resources and program performance on the Written Registry for
Respiratory Care Examination. Respiratory Care Education Annual (RESPIR CARE
EDUC ANNU), 2007 Fall; 16: 39-48 (15 ref)
A Review of the Literature
Forthcoming from the Respiratory
Care World
Forthcoming research: Karen Shaw, Program Director
form College of Southern Nevada, will be undertaking an
extensive research project for her doctoral degree
attempting to identify different factors between
successful and less successful RC program
Objective: examined the extent to which program
resources predicted program performance
Methods: analysis of all RT Programs throughout
the country and analyze data from 3 distinct groups or
cohorts of programs (top 3rd, middle 3rd and lower 3rd)
Point: I urge you to help her when requested to do so
Excellence* …
“Can be attained if you care more than others
think is wise, risk more than others think is
safe, dream more than others think is
practical, and expect more than others think
is possible”
*Valiga,T & Grossman S. The New Leadership Challenge: Creating
the Future of Nursing, 2000, FA Davis.
Successful RC Programs
2011 CoARC Distinguished RRT Credentialing
Success Awardees (32)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Borough of Manhattan Community College, New York, NY
Broward College, Coconut Creek, FL
Central Virginia Community College, Lynchburg, VA
Chattanooga State Community College, Chattanooga, TN
College of Southern Nevada, Las Vegas, NV
ConCorde Career College, Garden Grove, CA
ConCorde Career College, Memphis, TN
Dakota State University, Madison, SD
Foothill College, Los Altos Hills, CA
Georgia Health Sciences University, Augusta, GA
Gwinnett Technical College , Lawrenceville, GA
Successful RC Programs
2011 CoARC Distinguished RRT Credentialing
Success Awardees (32)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Harrisburg Area Community College - Harrisburg, PA
Henry Ford Community College - Dearborn, MI
Ivy Tech Community College -Wabash Valley, Terre Haute, IN
Kalamazoo Valley Community College - Kalamazoo, MI
Kapiolani Community College - Honolulu, HI
Long Island University - Brooklyn, NY
Louisiana State University Health Sciences - Shreveport, LA
Macomb Community College - Clinton Township, MI
Millersville University - Millersville, PA
Ohio State University - Columbus, OH
Ohlone College - Newark, CA
Successful RC Programs
2011 CoARC Distinguished RRT Credentialing
Success Awardees (32)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Ozarks Technical Community College - Springfield, MO
St Alexius Medical Center/University of Mary, - Bismarck, ND
Stony Brook University - Stony Brook, NY
Texas Southern University - Houston, TX
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences - Little Rock, AR
University of Missouri-Columbia - Columbia, MO
University of Missouri at Mercy Hospital - St. Louis, MO
University of Texas Health Science - San Antonio, TX
University of Texas Medical Branch - Galveston, TX
Victoria College - Victoria, TX
Survey of 32 Programs
with RRT Success
1st – Congratulations!
2nd – Thank You!
3rd – Share results (descriptive not evaluative)
• Suggestion – view data from perspective that
this is what the 32 reported out and how does
the data compare with my program
• What nuggets can I garner from the
survey results to aid me in making
improvements in my own program?
Curriculum
Laboratory
Faculty
Budget
Students
Clinical
Institutional
Information
Advisory
Board
Medical
Direction
Successful RC Programs
-Survey Results of Select VariablesInstitutional Data
• Type of Degree
•
AS or BS
•
Community College/Junior College, Technical or Vocational
School, Career or Technical College, 4-yr college/university,
Academic HCS/Medical center, US Military
• Institution Type
• Institutional Control/ Funding
•
Public/ Not for Profit, Private/ Not for Profit, Private/ for
Profit, Federal Government
• Geographic Location
• Program Inception Date
Successful RC Programs
Type of Degree
n-32
Successful RC Programs
Institutional Type
n-32
Successful RC Programs
Institutional Control/ Funding
n-32
Successful RC Programs
Geographic Location
n=32
Successful RC Programs
Program Inception Date
n-29
Successful RC Programs
-survey results of select variables-
Student Demographics*
•
•
•
•
Number of applicants per year
Number acceptances per year
Number of graduates per year
Per cent attrition
* in a typical year
Successful RC Programs
Number of Applicants
n-30
Successful RC Programs
Number of Acceptances
n-30
Successful RC Programs
Number of Graduates
n-30
Successful RC Programs
Percent Attrition
n-30
Successful RC Programs
-survey results of select variables•
•
•
•
•
•
Student Characteristics/Profile*
age at program entry
educational level at time of program entry
SAT/ACT Scores at entry
HS/ college/ science GPA
use of HOBET
Personal experiences with health care
* In a typical year for majority of students
Successful RC Programs
Age at Program Entry
n-30
Successful RC Programs
Educational Level at Program Entry
n-30
Successful RC Programs
SAT/ ACT Scores
n-27
Successful RC Programs
HS GPA -College GPA-Science GPA
N=6 for HS, 20 for College GPA, 25 for Science GPS
Successful RC Programs
Use of HOBET
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Personal HC Experience Motivation to Enter RC
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Other Significant Features About Students
N=16
•
•
•
•
•
•
Significant ethnic diversity (5)
RC was second choice, i.e. nursing first (3)
Career change (2)
Ernest, professional, motivated students
Serve as role model for children
Found profession by chance
Successful RC Programs
-survey results of select variables-
•
•
•
•
•
Curriculum
Total college credits
College credits in RC
College credits in math/ natural science
On-line option
other
Successful RC Programs
Total College Credits
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total RC Credits
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total Math/Science Credits
N=30
Successful RC Programs
On-Line Option
N=32
Successful RC Programs
Other Significant Features About Curriculum
• Soft skills and earnest study are stressed
• Curriculum includes NALS/PALS as credit
courses
• Include problem-based and case-based learning
• Lectures are all video taped and posted (3)
• Curriculum dove-tails with another BS institution
• Use a learning management system
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables •
•
•
•
•
Faculty Characteristics/ Profile
Number of full time
Number of part time
Number of adjuncts
Program’s Estimated FTEs
Key Program Faculty
• Program Director
• Director of Clinical Education
Successful RC Programs
Number of Full Time Faculty
N=32
Successful RC Programs
Number of Part Time Faculty
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Number of Full Time Equivalent Faculty
N=22
Successful RC Programs
-survey results of select variablesCharacteristics/ Profile of Key Program Personnel
• Highest degree of PD/DCE
• Years as PD/DCE at this program
• Years as PD/DCE at other institutions
• Years of experience in RC for PD/DEC
• Years of experience in RC education for PD/DCE
Successful RC Programs
Highest Academic Degree of Program
Director and Director of Clinical Education
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Number of Years as Program Director
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total Years of Experience for Program
Director in RC Education
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total Years of Experience for Program
Director in All Phases of RC
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Number of Years as Director of Clinical Education
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total Years of Experience for DCE
in RC Education
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Total Years of Experience for DCE
in All Phases of RC
N=30
Successful RC Programs
-survey results of select variables-
Laboratory Resources
Dedicated laboratory
Open lab
Use of lab
Square footage
Use of computerized clinical simulation
software
• Simulation technology
•
•
•
•
•
Successful RC Programs
Dedicated Lab- Open Lab – Usage of Lab
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Lab Space (best estimate of square footage)
N=26
Successful RC Programs
Use of Computerized Clinical Simulation
Software
N=29
• All programs that responded indicated they
used some form of computerized clinical
simulation software in their program (29)
• C & S Solution software used (8)
• NBRC SAE’s used (7)
• “Home-grown” simulations used (2)
Successful RC Programs
Mandatory Performance Requirement for Use
of Computerized Clinical Simulation Software
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Simulation Technology
N=30
Successful RC Programs
Unusual Facilities/ Equipment
N=14
• Human cadaver, animal lab, simulation center,
simulated ICU area
• Bronchoscopy lab
• All updated equipment
• Separate Polysomnography lab and computer
stations
• 24 ventilators – piped gases
• Video-capture system
• High-fidelity simulators
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables -
Clinical Resources
•
•
•
•
•
Number of sites
Total number of clinical contact hours
Clinical contact hours by specialty area
Compensation of clinical faculty
other
Successful RC Programs
Number of Clinical Sites
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Number of Clinical Contact Hours
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Per Cent of Clinical Contact Hours in Routine
Care/Procedures
N=28
Successful RC Programs
Per Cent of Clinical Contact Hours
in Critical Care
N=28
Successful RC Programs
Per Cent of Clinical Contact Hours
in Diagnostics
N=28
Successful RC Programs
Per Cent of Clinical Contact Hours
in Neonatal/ Pediatrics
N=28
Successful RC Programs
Per Cent of Clinical Contact Hours
in Physician Interaction
N=28
Successful RC Programs
Faculty primarily responsible for assuring
student clinical competency are faculty:
N=29
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables -
Medical Director
•
•
•
•
Contractual academic appointment
Time in administrative role
Time in teaching role
Compensation
Successful RC Programs
Does Medical Director have a contract
and/or hold an academic appointment
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Hours per year Medical Director Spends
in an Administrative Capacity
N=25
Successful RC Programs
Hours per year Medical Director Spends
in a Teaching Capacity
N=26
Successful RC Programs
Do you Pay your Medical Director?
N=29
Successful RC Programs
If yes, how much?
N=10
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables -
Advisory Board
• Number
• Frequency of meetings
• Role and activity
Successful RC Programs
Number of Advisory Board Members
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Number of Advisory Board Meetings Per Year
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Role/ Activity Level of Advisory Board
N=23
•
•
•
•
•
•
Review program statistics
Information sharing/ update
Advise on curriculum, clinical /community needs
Quarterly email updates
Help maintain quality
Assist as an interview panel (admissions)
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables -
Budget
• Annual capital budget
• Annual operating budget
Successful RC Programs
Capital Budget
N=19
Successful RC Programs
Operating Budget
N=22
Successful RC Programs
- survey results of select variables -
Participation in Credentialing Process
• Employer mandated
• Program mandated
• Motivating factors
Successful RC Programs
Employer Mandated Participation in Credentialing
Process as Requirement for Employment
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Program Mandates Participation in Credentialing
Process as Requirement for Graduation
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Program Espouses Professional Responsibility
to Pursue RRT
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Tangible Reward/ Incentive Provided
N=29
Successful RC Programs
Incentive, Reward, Motivation/ Strategy Employed
N=29
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Informed that program is RRT not CRT (4)
Higher salary for RRT – monetary incentive (5)
Program expectation – peer pressure
RRT promoted from day 1 – CRT is “rooky status”
Heap praise on them (3)
Take SAE’s – build their confidence
Institution pays for their RRT exam
Share school results – publicly celebrate their success
Names listed on white board – student comes up and
places credential next to name when they pass
It is our culture !
Have an alumni-sponsored dinner
Elements of Success
Relative Importance of Program Factors
N-29
Remediation Ctr
Library
Advisory Bd
Capital Budget
Science Faculty
Adm-non progrm
Operating budget
Med Director
MD Interaction
Students
Laboratory
Clin Faculty
Curriculum
Adm-program
Program Faculty
Clinical Facilities
Summary
• Listed 3 key variables that shape program
development, design and evaluation
• Provided a brief reviewed of the literature
• Recognized success stories (32 Programs)
• Identified some of the variables
• Encourage you to view these from
the perspective of your own program
• Closing thoughts
Closing thoughts
Excellence …
•
•
•
… means striving to be the very best we can be in
everything we do – not because some institutional
administrator or accrediting body or other
“authority” figure pushes us to do so, but because
we can not imagine functioning in any other way
… means setting high standards for ourselves and
the groups in which we are involved, holding
ourselves to those standards despite challenges or
pressures to reduce or lower them and not being
satisfied with anything less than the very best
… means not accepting the status quo, it’s being all
you can be
Closing thoughts
Excellence in Higher Education
(characteristics in the pursuit of excellence)
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Students
Faculty
Continuous quality improvement
Curriculum
Resources
Innovations
Educational resources
Environment
Teaching/learning and strategies
Leadership
Kalb K et al. The Hallmarks Survey: For Those Who Care to Teach the Very
Best. Nursing Education Perspectives. 2008, Jan/Feb, vol 29, no 1, 34-37.
closing thoughts
-Foundations of Excellence• Excellence is a process, not an outcome
• Excellence is a reflection of character, not
achievement
• Excellence allows for learning from mistakes,
not harsh criticism
• Excellence sees others in a supportive role,
not an adversarial role
• Excellence is willing to wait for
mastery to be achieved and does
not expect immediate results
Ok, so what is the single key ingredient
to program and professional success?
3 Elements of Excellence*
• Skepticism – keeping a proper distance from the
truth, not accepting everything blindly, keeping
our mind open to new ideas & approaches
• Perseverance – continually striving to fulfill a
goal or realize a vision
• Passion – being “inflamed” by your work –
passion is “the essence of excellence”
*Diers,
30.
D & Evans,DL (1980) Excellence in Nursing [Editorial] Image, 12, 27-
A MSRC Ode To Dr. Helmholz*
1911-2012
He strove to understand
Why certain pilots never land
He increased our knowledge and raised the bar
By helping us understand BMR
He shaped our craft to what it could be
And served us well as the President of the NBRC
He taught us the role of Bicarbonate
And found clever ways to help us dissolve it
A man of many talents since he was a lad
A better friend, our profession has never had
A writer of poetry we have read
A henry you know as Fred
*with gratitude to MSRC and Jeff Ward
Thank you
for the privilege and honor
of presenting the
2012 Dr. H. Fred Helmholz, MD
Education Lecture
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Xolair® Speakers` Bureau: Clinical Update