Sensory Integration
Parent Workshop
The 5 senses
• The commonly known senses –
• These keep us informed about what is
happening outside our body
PROPRIOCEPTION
• Sensations from joints and muscles
• The body’s A-Z (Map)
• We can always tell the position of
our body, without even looking
VESTIBULAR
SENSE
 Found in the inner ear
 Sends information to our brain
regarding:
- balance
- movement
- muscle tone
 Coordinates eyes, head and body
Sensory Integration
• Sensory Integration
• How the brain organises
sensory information for
use
• Can explain the
relationship between
brain and behavior
Why consider Sensory
Processes?
Sensory vs. Behavior
• All sensory process have a behavior/emotional
component
BUT
• Not all behavior has a sensory component
• All behavior is communicating a need
Effects of Sensory Integration
Difficulties
Motor Skills
Attention
An Analogy
The link between brain and behavior
Brain:
Behavior:
Hungry –
Seek more Sensory input
Just Right –
Play, Work, Learn
Avoid
Stuffed Full -
Displaying Negative
Behaviors to express
overload
Hungry
Sensory Seeking
Poor Registration
Under Responsive
Over Responsive
Sensitivity to Stimuli
Sensory Avoiding
Stuffed Full
The Hungry child
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Needs a lot of sensory information
•
May over-respond to sensory information
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Sensory seeking
Over-active
Flighty attention
Passive
“Day dreamy”
Miss important instructions
The Stuffed Full child
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Does not need a lot of sensory information
•
May over-respond to sensory information
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Sensory Avoiding
Doesn’t like clutter
May like clear spaces
Doesn’t like crowds
Be very controlled/controlling
Doesn’t like noises
Be very picky
Does SI affect Learning?
Yes….because learning requires
• The child’s behavior and alertness to be in
an optimal state to maintain attention to
tasks.
• The child’s motor skills to be in an optimal
state to perform and learn new tasks
successfully.
Does SI affect Behavior?
YES…
When sensory input is confusing or upsetting, the
child may actively avoid the situation, become
upset or have an emotional outburst .
When the child does not register enough stimulation
he may seek it out by constantly moving, chewing,
humming, or flapping or he or she may seem
tired, uninterested and passive. He may
rummage cupboards seeming to be in search of
food even when full.
Sensory Modulation
• How the child
responds to sensory
information
• Alerting
• Calming
Poor Adaptive Responses
• Fright
• Flight
• Fight
Provide a Balanced Diet
Morning Routine
• Alerting
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Vibrating Toothbrush
Crunchy Cereal
Trampoline
Simon Says Game
Shower
Cold, cold milk
• Calming
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Graduated Light
Gentle Music Alarm
Weighted blanket
Carrying clothes to
utility room
– Carry own school bag
– Chewy cereals
After School/Homework
• Alerting
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Playground
Crunchy Snack
Cold Drink
Sour Candies
Dancing
Music
Vibrating Cushion
Movement breaks
• Calming
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Playground
Chewing gum
Heated Room
Bath
Blowing bubbles
Fidgets
Cushions
Bed Time
• Alerting
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Exercise/Games
Vibrating toothbrush
Cold Drink
Music
Scented candles
• Calming
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Weighted blankets
Tight clothing
Heated Room
Calming songs
Read story without
pictures
– Bath
Some useful books
• The Out of Sync Child Has Fun: Carol Stock Krankowitz
• Parenting a Child with Sensory Processing Disorder:
Christopher Auer and Susan Blumberg
• Raising a Sensory Smart Child: Lindsey Beil, Nancy
Peske
• Building Bridges through Sensory Integration: Ellen
Yack, Paula Aquilla, Shirley Sutton
• Too Loud, Too Bright, Too Fast, Too Tight: What to do if
you are defensive in an overstimulation world: Elaine
Wilson and Helen Edwards
Some Useful Websites
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Sensory Integration Network
Sensory Integration International
Sensory Smart
Sensory Integrative Dysfunction in Young
Children