Welcome to
BASIC
PHOTOGRAPHY
Ms. Lepine
COURSE DESCRIPTION
BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY ~ ART814 ~ MS. LEPINE ~ ROOM 230
The fine arts student will interpret and express visually the world around him/her, will make
aesthetic judgments, which will enable him to improve his surroundings; will become
acquainted with different cultures, and how these cultures relate to the evolution of her own
art; and will be prepared for further study in various fields of art and art-related occupations.
BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY: ART814 Prerequisite: None. Semester course. Requirement:
Students must have their own 35mm camera. A SLR or single-lens camera is recommended.
Basic Photography deals with the power and impact of visual images in our history and in our
society. Through a workshop-type approach to basic photography and its components, i.e.,
light, subject, camera, and film, this course attempts to describe methods of and approaches to
reading, understanding, and appreciating various types of visual images. Emphasis is on black
and white still photography from the shooting through the processing and printing, to final
mounting and framing techniques. Visual and written presentations, as well as reading
assignments also make up a substantial part of the course.
*Articulation Agreement: Upon completion of this course, the WSHS student would be
exempt from (and receive credit for) Basic Still Photography (Art 140) at Holyoke
Community College.
COURSE OUTLINE
BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY ~ ART814 ~ MS. LEPINE ~ ROOM 230
1. INTRODUCTION TO BASIC PHOTOGRAPHY
Course Description
Classroom Expectations
Evaluation of Grades
Assignments Required
Safety & Appropriate Behavior
2. HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY (Chap. 21, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
The First Camera ~ Camera Obscura ~ Early 1800’s
Early Inventors ~ Photographic Chemistry
Dauguerreotype, Calotype, Collodion – Early Photographic Processes
Documenting Society & History – War, Travel, Portraiture
American Photography
3. PHOTOGRAMS (Chap. 3, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
History of
Types of Photograms
Introduction to Darkroom Chemicals
Creativity
4. THE PINHOLE CAMERA (Chap. 4, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Origins of the Camera
Basic Camera Parts
Make a Pinhole Camera
Take Pinhole Pictures
Types of Pinhole Cameras ~ Getting Creative
5. VISUAL LITERACY (Chap. 1, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
The Power of the Image as a Communication Tool
What Makes a Good Photographer
Aesthetic Comprehension ~ What is Beautiful???
6. LEARNING TO SEE: (Chap. 2, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Seeing as a Learned Ability
Composition ~ Design ~ Elements & Principles
Visual Selection
Determining the Subject
Camera Position
Framing the Photograph
Subject Placement (Rule of Thirds)
Background
Aperture
Shutter Speed
Deciding When to Take the Picture
Shooting Tips
Finding Your Own Style
7. CAMERA & BASIC CAMERA FUNCTIONS (Chap. 5, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Types of Cameras
Point & Shoot/Rangefinder
Single-Lens Reflex SLR
Twin-Lens Reflex TLR
Medium Format
View Cameras
Specialty Cameras - Digital
Buying a Camera
Camera Care
Basic Camera Functions
Loading & Unloading Film (!), Focusing Methods, Exposure Controls,
Shutter Speed, Aperture, Film Speed (ISO), Lenses
8. 20th Century Photography
Pictorialism
Steiglitz ~ is it art?
Photo Montage/Collage
Photo in Sports/Fashion/Advertising
Color & Instant Photography
Since the 1960’s
1. Space
2. Social Awareness/Causes
3. War
4. Portraiture
5. Self-Portrait/Personal Journals
6. Landscape
9. BLACK & WHITE FILM DEVELOPING (Chap. 10, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Roll Film Developing Process
Evaluating Processed Film
Storage & Care
Contact Printing
Editing Contact Sheet
10. BLACK & WHITE PRINTMAKING (Chap. 11, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Enlarger
Papers
Chemicals and Safety
Using Test Strips
Making a Contact Sheet
Making an Enlargement
Print Evaluation
Printing Problems
11. 21st CENTURY PHOTOGRAPHY
Modern Advances
Current Issues, Digital -vs- Film
Contemporary Photographers
12. ADVANCED PRINTMAKING (Chap 12, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Corrective Darkroom Manipulations (covered only if we have time)
Burning In, Dodging, Cropping, Vignette, Diffusion, Distortion, Texture Effects,
Sandwiching Images, Multiple Prints ~ Combining Prints
13. OUT OF DARKROOM IMAGE MANIPULATIONS (Chap. 16, Photography in Focus, 5th Ed.)
Toning Black & White Prints ~ Toner, Coffee, Tea, Food Coloring
Masking with Bleach ~ Using Rubber Cement or Tape
Hand Coloring
14. CONCLUSION
Final Exam/Portfolio Review
You will need:
• 35 mm camera
NO disposable, digital, advantix
• 3 ring binder
Your portfolio is 20% of your final grade!
• Positive attitude
Be Here
Be Responsible
Be Respectful
GRADING:
Class Participation = 50%
Tests/Quizzes
= 20%
Portfolio (!!!)
Homework
= 20%
= 10%
I grade on: ~ BEHAVIOR
~ HOW WELL YOU FOLLOW DIRECTIONS
~ CREATIVITY
~ EFFORT
~ PRESENTATION
The FINAL EXAM will cover all the material studied during the semester and is worth 20% of
your final grade.
LATE WORK RECEIVES HALF CREDIT (unless you have an IEP, 504, or doctor’s note)
~ Projects not turned in receive 0%.
~ Behavior counts toward your project grade!
~ Every day you choose not to work you will receive 0% for the day.
(with each zero, your project gets marked off one grade)
WORK:
~ Assignments and due dates are on the board at all times.
~ Every time we meet, I will give a lesson, review or update assignments, or give a
demonstration. After this, you will begin working on the assignment and I will come around
to advise. Working for the entire period will earn you the most class participation points.
~ Work to be passed in should be placed in the “in” box labeled for your class period. Work
not placed in the “in” box on time will be considered late.
STUDENT RESPONSIBILITY:
~ Positive daily class participation.
~ The keeping of a portfolio with all artwork, tests, quizzes, homework, reports, projects.
~ The completion of all artwork, tests, quizzes, homework, reports and projects.
~ Follow all rules outlined in the Student Handbook and all classroom rules.
~ The cost of lost or damaged equipment supplied by the school.
~ The use of safe working techniques at all times including eye and hand protection.
SAFETY:
Equipment and chemicals in the PHOTOGRAPHY DARKROOM are safeguarded as much as possible. Safety,
in general, and safe tool practices are emphasized repeatedly. However, bodily injury can occur through
carelessness, misuse of equipment and/or disobedience.
Running, wrestling, throwing objects, etc. in the classroom, darkroom, or hallway is not acceptable and
may seriously harm you or your classmates. We use sharp objects, tools that cut, and toxic chemicals in
this room and in the darkroom. We must take every precaution to be safe.
I understand that:
1.
I must observe all safety regulations.
2.
I must abide by all rules pertaining to all safety devices.
3.
I must wear appropriate clothing/eyewear when required by the instructor.
4.
I should not jeopardize the safety of my classmates by carelessness, indifference to safety,
and/or indulge in improper school behavior.
5.
I must tell my instructor immediately if someone’s safety is at risk.
6.
I must tell my instructor if I have any health concerns that may jeopardize my safety around
chemicals (asthma, migraines, allergies, pregnancy, etc.)
WHAT YOU CAN EXPECT OF ME:
~ I will always enforce these guidelines.
~ Projects will be graded and returned promptly.
(once graded, it is EXTREMELY IMPORTANT to keep projects in your
portfolio to be reviewed at the end of the semester)
~ I will create a space for all to be accepted and to enjoy learning.
~ I will respond to your individual needs and advise you to succeed.
Questions?
Download

Basic Still Photography