Citizenship and social action:
developing skills for the future
Julia Fiehn
for the Learning and Skills Network
AQA Complete Sixth Form Conference
24 June 2011
Aims of session
• To identify the skills gained from active citizenship
• To illustrate activities that develop these skills
• To explore the relevance of these skills for future
education and employment
The background
• 2002: Citizenship education made statutory for 11-16 year olds
(following first Crick report - 1998)
• 2000: Second Crick report, on post-16 Citizenship
• 2001 - 2005: Post-16 Citizenship Development Programme ran
in 11 projects areas
• 2005 - present: Post-16 Citizenship Support Programme
provides free resources, website and training, funded by BIS
via LSIS, managed by LSN
(www.post16citizenship.org)
• Future: unsure, but most aims overlap with current
government’s policies for ‘Big Society’
•
What is citizenship education?
Citizenship education involves young people in:
• the investigation of topical, controversial, social and
political issues
• forming considered opinions
• being willing and able to use their voice in their
organisation and community
• gaining knowledge about our political system
• gaining the skills needed to engage in it
• taking responsible social action to influence an issue
WHAT IS CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION?
A FOCUS ON THE PUBLIC ASPECTS OF LIFE
The issue
Examples of
PERSONAL aspects
Examples of
PUBLIC aspects
Drugs and alcohol
What effects can
addiction have on a
person’s life?
How should addicts be
treated by the judicial
system?
Personal finance
How can I keep out of
debt?
What are the social
implications of fees for
higher education?
Sexual health
How can people avoid
sexually transmitted
infections?
How effective is the
strategy for health
education aimed at
young people?
Range of approaches to citizenship education
in post-16 organisations
Citizenship education through:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Learner voice and representation
Relevant qualifications and personalised programmes
Group tutorial and enrichment programmes
Voluntary and community-based activities
Single events
Research projects
Essential opportunities for citizenship learning
•
Identify, investigate and think critically about citizenship issues,
problems or events of concern to them
and
•
decide on and take part in follow-up social action, where appropriate
and
•
reflect on, recognise and review their citizenship learning
Learning skills: the stages
Identifying skills
Developing skills
Practising skills
Applying and consolidating skills
Reflecting on and reviewing skills
Activity 1
VIDEO CLIP: DEBATES
(an example of preparation and reflection to identify and develop
skills. See www.post16citizenship.org)
Activity 2
NEGOTIATION SKILLS
(a role play activity)
Activity 3
(a discussion activity in pairs with observer)
Persuade a doubter that citizenship
skills support success in future
education, employment or training.
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WHAT IS CITIZENSHIP EDUCATION?