Getting Started with C++
Part 2
1
Getting Started on Linux
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Today we will look at Linux.
See how to copy files between
Windows and Linux
Compile and run the “Hello, World”
program.
Try out a very simple editor.
2
hello.cpp
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If you don’t have hello.cpp from last
class you can download it from the class
web site:
http://www.cse.usf.edu/~turnerr/Object_Oriented_Design/Downloads/
3
Downloads Area
Download the file without the .txt extension.
Save it as hello.cpp
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Downloading with Internet Explorer
Right click on the file name.
Select “Save Target As …”
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Save to the Desktop
Be sure to select “All Files”
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About Circe
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All USF students have access to a Linux
system known as Circe.
Try logging in with your USF NetID.
If unsuccessful, you can set up an
account on line.
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(Details follow.)
7
Connecting to Circe
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Use an SSH terminal client program to
connect to Circe.
Recommended client program is PuTTY
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Can download from
http://it.usf.edu/standards/security/tools
You will also need an SSH file transfer
program.
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WinSCP
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USF IT Software Page
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Connecting with PuTTY
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Using Circe
11
Create a Test Directory
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Copying a File to Circe
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Use an SSH file transfer program to copy
the C++ source file to an empty
directory on Circe.
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WinSCP
FSecure Shell
Create a new directory if necessary.
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Connecting to Circe with WinSCP
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Connected to Circe
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Pick a Directory
Pick an empty directory to work in.
Or create a new one.
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Copy Source File
Drag source file
into remote
directory window
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Open a Terminal Window
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Connect to Circe and cd to Test Directory.
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Compile the Program
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Run It
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Creating a Source File on Circe
Delete existing files. We will start from scratch.
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Creating a Source File on Circe
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Creating a Source File on Circe
Press Ctrl-o to write out the file.
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Creating a Source File on Circe
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Creating a Source File on Circe
Press Ctrl-x to exit.
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Exit from the Editor
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View the Source File
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Compile and Run
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The Manipulator endl
#include <iostream>
int main( void )
{
std::cout << "Hello, World!";
std::cout << std::endl;
return 0;
}
std::endl is not a character like '\n'
It is an instruction to cout to start a new line.
Referred to as a manipulator.
30
Multiple outputs with cout
#include <iostream>
int main( void )
{
std::cout << "Hello, World!" << std::endl;
std::cin.get();
return 0;
}
<< operators can be cascaded as many times as you wish.
31
Input from the Keyboard
#include <iostream>
int main( void )
{
int a;
int b;
std::cout << "Enter two integers to compute their sum:" << std::endl;
std::cin >> a;
std::cin >> b;
std::cout << "The sum of " << a << " and " << b
std::cout << a + b << std::endl;
<< " is ";
return 0;
}
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Input from the Keyboard
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Avoiding all those "std::"s
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;
int main( void )
{
int a;
int b;
cout << "Enter two integers to computer their sum:" << endl;
cin >> a;
cin >> b;
cout << "The sum of " << a << " and " << b
cout << a + b << endl;
<< " is ";
return 0;
}
34
Being More Selective
#include <iostream>
using std::cin;
using std::cout;
using std::endl;
This is generally considered better practice.
int main( void )
{
int a;
int b;
cout << "Enter two integers to computer their sum:" << endl;
cin >> a;
cin >> b;
cout << "The sum of " << a << " and " << b
cout << a + b << endl;
...
return 0;
}
<< " is ";
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Assignment
Before next class
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Be sure you can connect to Circe and log
in using your USF NetID.
Do today’s examples for yourself
if you didn’t do them in class.
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Read Chapters 1 and 2.
End of Presentation
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Download

ppt