WHANAU ORA
Sharing the Learning
2011
Mason Durie
Whānau Ora Governance Board
Sir Paul Reeves
1933 - 2011
Over the past two days, it has become clear that:
Whānau potential is high and ready to be unleashed
Whānau Ora provider networks are extensive,
committed, innovative, and ready to learn from
each other
Whānau Ora is already anchored on solid
foundations that will bring fresh opportunities and
gains for whānau in the decade ahead.
‘It takes a village to raise a child’
‘..believe in change and in transforming lives’
‘Restoring trusting relationships within
whanau, between whānau, providers and
navigators, & with state agencies’
‘No-0ne else can do it for us’
‘The most important thing is to achieve good
outcomes for whānau’
John Tamihere
Iharaera Henare
Cannons Creek Whānau
Family Life Education Pasifika
‘I want to finish education for
myself and for my daughter’
‘.. A social worker who could
work with people and inspire us’
• Always
going to be
another mountain’
• Anticipation of future roles
‘My greatest fear is to think big’
• Building bridges to carry 2way traffic
‘I want to breathe the air from
the highest steps’
• Youth engagement
strategies - music, art,
‘I used negative energy and
turned it into inspiration’
• Relationship building over
time
Lianna Burns
Sarah-Jane Smith
‘How can Whānau Ora play its part in ensuring that
the state sector is more effective in the services it
delivers to Maori ?’
TPK as a facilitator of Maori Crown relationships
Leith Comer
‘The Whānau Ora landscape can influence
Government as much as communities’
‘Te Puni Kokiri is committed to playing its role’
Geoff Short, Gail Campbell, Richard Wood, Gabrielle Baker,
Gerardine Clifford-Lidstone
• 158 integrated contacts and 8 business cases under way
• Building Whānau Ora into the core business of the state
• Results based accountabilities – an approach that can
accommodate individuals as well as collectives (whānau)
• Whānau stories to convey the issues
• Walking with provider collectives
• The whānau planning space has been inspirational
The background to NUMA
1.Whanau O Waipareira Trust
2.Manukau Urban Maori Authority
3.Otangarei Trust
4.Te Runanga O Kirikiriroa
5.Te Ropu Awhina ki Porirua
6.Te Runanga O Nga Mātaa Waka
Willie Jackson
• Whānau Ora – a legacy
from earlier generations Puaoteatatu, Tu Tangata
• Going further – beyond
sectoral interests
• The Whanau hapu Iwi
continuum is as relavant
to urban Maori as to
others
Pauline Kingi
Te Ope Koiora
Whānau Ora & Tainui
National Urban
Māori Authority
‘Walking the talk’
Pacific Nations
Whānau Ora
in Action
The Tainui 50 year plan
Catastrophe to recovery
• Culture & values
Social & economic
transformation
Forward planning
Locally driven
• A sense of
belonging
A korowai to align
services with an Iwi
kaupapa
Marae as a disaster
recovery centre
• Modelling hope
and change
Collective action & skills
Whānau Ora centres
Public private partners
Collaboration
Whānau resilience
• Champions for
change
Te Pū o te Wheke
Pacific Care Trust
Te Ao Hou
Achievements
• Rural access a problem but Whanua Ora kaupapa overcomes distance
• Able to interact with other organisations in a climate of trust
• Frank discussions even when there is still a competitive element
• Able to place the difficult issues on the agenda
Thinking about whānau
• Whānau voices, Laughter in the house and connections with whenua
• Meaningful work, Business plan preparation
Whanau Ora in 5 years time
•Connections with other organisations
•Sharing skills, training
•Happy, economically secure, engaged whānau

Whānau Centred Practices

Achieving Outcomes

Investing in Workforce

Investing in Infrastructure and Quality

Governance and Leadership
The Phenomena of Care
Establishing the bonds
Whanaungatanga
Whakapapa
Kaumātua
Six Whānau Ora
principles including
relationships, care for
each other, wairua
PATH Model
• Planning - alternative-tomorrowshope
• Model for working with whānau in
a planning process
• Thinking beyond and beginning
with the end in mind
• A 12 step process
Paraire Huata
Kataraina Pipi
Mariao Hohaia
RBA
Te Tukunga Iho o
The Maori Way te Pu o te Wheke
Value for
Money
What difference
did you make ?
Māori models
Whose values
One stop shops
Future
generations
The story behind
the baseline
What works?
Integrated
contracts linked to
outcomes
Karen Vercoe
Te Pu o te Wheke
Non- $ values
Investments to
grow the
investment
Mataora
Waipareira
Model
Whanau at the
centre
Drives
outcomes
Priviledge the
organisation
Nan
Wehipeihana Julian King
Laurie Porima
Maori Organisation?
The Oranganui
experience
• Kaupapa ake
• Organisational
whakapapa
• Whakatauaki & policy
Jennifer
Tamehana
Open Forum
Takarangi
Competency
Framework
14 competencies at 4
levels
Cultural knowledge
and practice
Clinical knowledge
and practice
Terry Huriwai Moe Milne
Transforming
Whānau
A workforce that is bold,
smart, creative, strategic
And is Maori
Shift towards what
whānau will do for
themselves
TKA model of practice
Wheturangi
Walsh-Tapiata
Pam Armstrong
Beyond the
Pretty Screen
Quality in a
Moodle Box
Refining
Quality
Pacific
Innovation
Navigating to
Outcomes
IT decisions need to be based on strategic plans rather than immediate needs
The Moodle box will be useful to support quality assurance, accreditation
Negotiation of boundaries - Whānau Ora and Pasifika
Fanau Ora and Pacific aspirations
Use of Karaoke to engage with whanau – planning and integrating with ‘magic’
Carlos Martinez,
Microsoft NZ
Rita
Paula
O’Callaghan Parkin
Jackie
Debbie
Richardson Ryan
Rawiri
Waititi
Jacqui
Harema
‘The Good the Bad
& the Ugly’
Whānau Leadership
& Resilience
Indigenous concepts,
ideologies, tools
• Resilient whānau are
better prepared
Courage to break new
ground
• Principles for resilience
•Whanaungatanga
•Pukenga
•Tikanga
•Tuakiri-a-Iwi
• Resilience strategies
(protective and coping
strategies
The purpose of
leadership
The value of Trust
Panel
Discussion
Poor leadership
and good leadership
The X factor
Leadership is personal
Leadership for the future
Distributed leadership
Doug Hauraki,
MerepekaRaukawa-Tait
Alfred Ngaro
Jordan Waiti
Whanau
Centred
Practice
Governance
&
Leadership
Infrastructure &
Quality
Whanau
Ora
Achieving
Outcomes
Workforce
Phase
Task
Result
Indicator
1
Making the case

Task Force Report Feb 2010
2
Government Endorsement

Minister Whanau Ora March 2010
Dedicated Whanau Ora Fund
3
Establishment
• Management

TPK + MoH, MSD March 2010
WIIE Fund, Whanau Centred Services Fund
Governance Body April 2011
Regional Leadership Groups June 2010
25 Provider Groups identified Oct 2010
• Accountability
• Identification Providers
4
5



Operationalisation
• Whanau Ora Contracts
• Additional contracts
• Provider networking, &
development
ongoing

Ongoing

Growing the Model
ongoing
• 20 integrated contracts August 2011
• Further 5 + 8 providers identified
• Integrated data management systems
• Sharing the Learning August 2011
2011 - 2020

Establishment and Implementation phases
are well underway

Phases for the next decade need to be
considered

Phase 5 will need to contain a series of
strategic goals to increase the reach and
impact of Whānau Ora
Phase
5a
Task
Socialising the model
Aim
• Model normalised across agencies
• Whanau Impact Assessment tool applied to
all Govt and Iwi policies
Phase
Task
Aim
5a
Socialising the model
• Model normalised across agencies
• Whanau Impact Assessment tool applied to
all Govt and Iwi policies
5b
Re-focussing the model
Prioritisation schedules
• ? Vulnerable whanau
• ? Tamariki, rangatahi
• ? Kaumatua
Phase
Task
Aim
5a
Socialising the model
• Normalising the model across agencies
• Whānau Impact Assessment tool applied to
all Govt and Iwi policies
5b
Re-focusing the model
Prioritisation schedules
• ? Vulnerable whānau
• ? Tamariki, rangatahi
• ? Kaumātua
5c
Quantifying the model
• Setting Affirmation Targets
• Measuring Whānau ‘incidents’
• Measuring Whānau achievements
Whānau ‘Incident ‘Targets
(examples)
By 2015:
30% reduction in domestic violence
50% reduction of truancy
60% reduction in rheumatic fever
25% reduction in youth offending
30% reduction in unemployment
50% reduction in welfare benefits
Whānau ‘Incident ‘Targets
(examples)
By 2015:
Whānau Achievement
Targets (examples)
By 2015:
30% reduction in domestic violence
60% whānau are financially
literate
50% reduction of truancy
75% whānau are health literate
60% reduction in rheumatic fever
25% reduction in youth offending
30% reduction in unemployment
50% reduction in welfare benefits
60% whānau are e-literate
80% whānau are succeding in
programmes of learning
60% whānau are fluent speakers of
Maori
40% whānau are ‘estate’ literate
Phase
Task
Aim
5a
Socialising the model
• Model normalised across agencies
• Whanau Impact Assessment tool applied to
all Govt and Iwi policies
5b
Re-focusing the model
Prioritisation schedules
• ? Vulnerable whanau
• ? Tamariki, rangatahi
• ? Kaumatua
5c
Quantifying the model
• Setting Affirmation Targets
• Measuring Whanau ‘incidents’
• Measuring Whanau achievements
5d
Incentivising the model
Rewards if targets are exceeded
Penalties it targets are not met
Phase
Task
Aim
5a
Socialising the model
• Model normalised across agencies
• Whanau Impact Assessment tool applied to
all Govt and Iwi policies
5b
Re-focusing the model
Prioritisation schedules
• ? Vulnerable whanau
• ? Tamariki, rangatahi
• ? Kaumatua
5c
Quantifying the model
• Setting Affirmation Targets
• Measuring Whanau ‘incidents’
• Measuring Whanau achievements
5d
Incentivising the model
? Rewards if targets are exceeded
? Penalties it targets are not met
5e
Devolving the model
From state to Māori (Iwi, RLGs, Communities)
Tena koutou katoa
Over the past two days, it has become clear that:
Whānau potential is high and ready to be unleashed
Whānau Ora provider networks are extensive,
committed, innovative, and ready to learn from
each other
Whānau Ora is already anchored on solid
foundations that will bring fresh opportunities and
gains for whānau in the decade ahead.
The burdens carried by whānau today must be
addressed. But they should not obscure the
vision for tomorrow – the translation of high
hopes into strong whānau who will lead
communities throughout Aotearoa.
The burdens carried by whānau today must be
addressed. But they should not obscure the
vision for tomorrow – the translation of high
hopes into strong whānau who will lead
communities throughout Aotearoa.
If the energy, rhythm and sharing experienced at this Hui is
any guide, then:
Whānau Ora will come to inspire the nation and
act as a beacon of hope for indigenous peoples
across the globe
Whānau potential is high and ready to be unleashed
Whānau Ora provider networks are extensive,
committed, innovative, & ready to learn from each other
Whānau Ora is already anchored on solid foundations
that will bring fresh opportunities and gains for whānau
in the decade ahead.
The Whānau Ora vision converts high hopes into strong
whānau to lead communities throughout Aotearoa
Whānau Ora will come to inspire the nation and act as a
beacon of hope for indigenous peoples across the globe
Download

Whanau Ora Summary - NUMA - National Urban Maori Authority