Mentoring
Information Session
Marie Connolly
Head of Learning & Development
Human Resources Division
Why Mentoring in UL
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Set up initially as a sub group of the Women’s
Forum – Mentoring Committee
Demand across all genders and all areas
Fully integrated system
Over 70 matched pairs to-date
2011 – 23 matched pairs across all groupings.
30+ trained Mentors
The aim of the Mentoring
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The aim of the mentoring initiative to
provide a platform through which
experiences can be shared on a oneto-one informal basis thus providing
support to people at various stages in
their careers.
Mentoring
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Mentoring is a Career Management Tool used by
organisations to nurture and develop their staff.
It is a relationship between two people in a work setting
the purpose of which is passing on knowledge and
information, sharing wisdom and experience and offering
advice and help in a confidential manner.
It is a relationship where - help by one person to another
in making significant transitions in knowledge, work and
or thinking.
It builds on the formal Mentoring scheme where new
employees are allocated a mentor.
• “A relationship between equals in which one
or more of those involved is enabled to:
increase awareness, identify alternatives and
initiate action to develop themselves.”
(Julie Hay, Transformational Mentoring)
Mentoring Definitions
Creating possibilities and providing
guidance and support to others in a
relationship of trust; it includes
facilitating, bringing visions to life and
enabling people to achieve (Henley
Management College 2000)
Mentoring
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“Offline help by one person to another in
making significant transitions in knowledge,
work or thinking” (Megginson & Clutterbuck
1995)
“A relationship, not just a procedure or
activity, where one person professionally
assists the development of another outside
of the normal manager/subordinate
relationship” (Abbey)
The Mentor-Mentee Connection
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The Mentor-Mentee connection
focuses on building trusting
relationships. Mentees are supported
and encouraged by Mentors who
voluntarily give of their time.
Mentoring versus Coaching
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Coaching can be the responsibility of a
line manager who has an immediate
and day to day accountability for the
learner’s performance while a mentor
is rarely a learner’s line manager.
The aims of the UL Mentoring
Scheme are:
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Helping Mentees to build self
confidence
Sharing knowledge, skills and
experience
Increase cross departmental
networking
Help with career planning
Encouraging inclusivity across the
University.
The Matching Process
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Pairs will not be matched within the same
Department./Division unless specifically requested.
Job Title and grade – the mentor will generally be
employed at a higher grade (2 grades higher in
administrative post – 1 above in academic posts)
that the mentee.
The type of help the mentee is looking for
Preferences in terms of what the mentee is looking
for
Activities and interests of both
Support provided by the
Mentoring Scheme
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On going training events
Lunch time talks
Training for both the Mentors &
Mentees
Support will be provided to any
mentoring pair that requests support
Special Events
Purpose of the Training
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All Mentors & Mentees must undertake
training.
Be clear on what mentoring is and how it is
different that other development
interventions
Understand the role and responsibilities of
the mentor and mentees.
Know what needs to happen to make a
mentoring relationship work.
Purpose of the Training
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Understand the areas that mentoring is
suitable to deal with and what issue are
outside the boundaries of the mentoring
relationship.
Know what can go wrong in mentoring
relationships and the action you can take
Explore the skills necessary in any
mentoring interaction.
Benefits of Mentoring
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To the Mentee
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A smoother adjustment to a new role or position
Help in acquiring more quickly and
comprehensively the skills and knowledge they
need
Help with the necessary choices in the
development of their careers
Access to someone more senior than
themselves, other than their line manager
A greater understanding of both the formal and
informal workings of the organisation
Benefits of Mentoring
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To the Mentor
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Increased motivation and self-esteem brought
about by the mentoring role
Greater respect and recognition from staff in the
organisation
An opportunity to hone and improve their own
management skills, particularly advisory and
supporting skills in a safe environment
An opportunity to learn about the perspectives
and views of others less senior than themselves
and in other parts of the organisation
A chance to influence and improve
communications with others in the organisation
Benefits of Mentoring
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To the Organisation
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An opportunity for staff to be encouraged,
supported and motivated to reach their potential
Greater job satisfaction, morale and commitment
by mentors and mentees to their work
Improved work performance of mentees
Leading to a more stable culture
Improved communication through linking
different departments and levels within the
organisation
Established routes for effective career
development that can aid the recruitment of high
calibre staff
Who should Mentor?
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A mentor is usually
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A more experienced and senior person than the
mentee
May have technical or professional expertise
Not the Mentee's manager
Those who are interested in the development of
others and who enjoy sharing their knowledge
and experiences
Have considered the time commitment,
emotional resources and sustained effort that
may be involved.
The Role of the Mentor
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To provide guidance on how to acquire the
necessary knowledge and skills to do a new job
Advice on dealing with any administrative, technical
or people problems.
Information on ‘the way things are done around
here’
Help in obtaining access to information and people
within the University and outside
Mentoring in specific skills e.g. managerial skills,
leadership, communication skills etc.
A parental figure with whom mentees can discuss
their aspirations and concerns and who will lend a
sympathetic ear to their problems.
UL Mentoring Scheme
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The UL Mentoring Scheme is a
Mentee led scheme.
Roles & Responsibilities
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For the mentoring relationship to be
effective the mentor and mentee need to be
clear about their respective roles and
responsibilities.
They also need to consider the role of the
mentor in relation to the Mentee's line
manager.
Without clarification misunderstandings may
occur that could impact on the effectiveness
of the relationship.
The relationship
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Mentors will:
– Meet with mentees for confidential
discussions
– Prompt mentees to draw up their own
plans
– Prompt mentees to make contact with
others who might be able to provide
useful information or advise
– Prompt mentees to approach their line
managers to seek specific support for
development activities
The Relationship
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Mentors will not:
– Take action on behalf of mentees
– Intervene on behalf of mentees
– Take part in any succession planning
discussions that relate to their own
mentee
– Discuss the mentee with the line
manager
The Relationship
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Mentees will:
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Meet with mentors for confidential discussions
Access other sources of information and advise
as may seem appropriate
Share information about their strengths,
weaknesses, ambitions and so on openly with
their mentor
Take responsibility for drawing up their own
development plans
Take responsibility for appropriate contact with
their line managers about development issues
Initiate their own development plans
Line Managers
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Will allow mentees time to attend
mentoring sessions
Will provide whatever support is
feasible to the development of the
mentee
Will not attempt to talk to the mentor
about the mentee.
Mentor Qualities
A Mentor is someone who:
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Listens
Is an opposite (at times)
Uses non-judgemental questioning
Offers different perspectives
Has specific knowledge
Cares; is warm; wants to help
Can relate to issues of the mentee
Sees patterns
Has experience
Is trustworthy/ensure confidentiality
Mentee Qualities
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Motivated
Articulate expectations and own objectives
Meets commitments
Accepts feedback and acts on it
Listens
Self-aware
Open Trustworthy
Understands scheme objectives/process
Key Role of Mentors
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To provide:
– 1. Support
– 2. Challenge
– 3. Guidance
Establishing Trust & Respect
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Careful preparation at the start of the
relationship will help build rapport
Trust is reciprocal, if the mentor trusts the
mentee and vice versa the relationship is
more likely to build on trust.
Once trust is lost it is very difficult to rebuild
The importance of valuing and respecting
difference
What Mentees need to ask
themselves?
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What do they want (from the mentoring
relationship, what learning outcomes are
they aiming for etc.)
How will they know when they have got
there?
What strengths do they have in what they
do now, that will help them get this
outcome?
How much time can they expect from my
Mentor?
Preparing for your mentoring
partnership
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Agree a Mentoring Contract Below
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Expectations (of each other, of the relationship,
of what both parties will learn)
Confidentiality (should any third parties be
informed, and if so, what can be discussed with
third parties about the relationship and about the
discussions?)
Duration of relationship – 12 months
Meetings (frequency, duration, location – in
office or outside the workplace?)
Preparing for the mentoring
partnership
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Broad purpose and goals
Review and evaluation (of relationship, of
mentor/client, and of client’s progress)
Roles and responsibilities (preparing for meetings,
setting the agenda, ensuring the meetings take
place, setting goals)
How feedback will be handled (trust and openness)
How you will end the relationship (celebration,
disengaging)
What actions we will take if things go wrong in our
partnership.
Information/Contact Details
 www.ul.ie/hr - Learning Development
& Equal Opportunities – Mentoring
(FAQ’s)
TRAINING
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Mentor & Mentee Training – Half day
Workshops – March 2012
End of Presentation
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Marie Connolly Head of Learning & Development Human