All of the following were important precursors
to the Scientific Revolution except
1. Renaissance artists
2. Enlightenment
philosophers
3. technological advances
4. Hermetic magic
5. ancient
mathematicians
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
Copernicus concluded that Ptolemy’s view of the
universe was
1. right because it confirmed
the laws of reason
2. wrong because it did not
match his mathematical
calculations
3. the only truly Christian
interpretation of the
heavens
4. destined to be confirmed
by telescopic observations
5. wrong because it relied on
a series of concentric
spheres
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
The three laws of planetary motion were
developed by
20%
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
20%
20%
20%
3
4
20%
Kepler
Copernicus
Newton
Ptolemy
Pascal
1
2
5
The Catholic Church forced Galileo to reject
Copernicanism because
1. he was not behaving like
a faithful Catholic
2. it threatened Scripture
and the dominant
understanding of the
universe
3. he criticized the pope
4. he renounced his faith
5. it supported
Protestantism
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
Isaac Newton’s law of gravity
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
came to him when an apple
fell on his head
had its inception in his
scholar’s chambers at
Cambridge
proved to him that religious
teachings were mere
superstitions
showed that one
mathematical law applied
throughout the universe
overturned much of the
work completed by
Copernicus, Kepler, and
Galileo
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
The theory that a volume of a gas was
proportional to the pressure exerted on it was
identified by
20%
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
20%
20%
20%
3
4
20%
William Harvey
Paracelsus
Johannes Kepler
Robert Bellarmine
Robert Boyle
1
2
5
The main difference between early British and German
women scientists was that
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
women scientists were more
numerous in Britain than in
Germany
in Britain they were usually
women of leisure and in
Germany they were
craftswomen
in Germany a woman had to be
single to pursue a scientific
career
in Britain women were
inducted into the Royal Society,
but not in Germany
British women were more
likely to be involved in
astronomy
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
In regards to commonly held ideas about women, the
Scientific Revolution
1. overturned sexual
stereotypes
2. rejected the notion that
women needed to be
controlled
3. promoted the equality of
the sexes
4. provided scientific
evidence that men and
women should be equals
5. reaffirmed traditional
notions
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
In his explorations of anatomy, Vesalius suggested that
the physical differences between men and women
1. were external only
2. were skeletal and
internal only
3. were external and
skeletal
4. proved the inferiority
of women
5. proved the equality of
women
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
The significance of Descartes’ theories was that they
1. proved with logic the
accuracy of Galileo’s laws
2. formed an acceptable
alternative to Newton’s
Principia
3. created a division between
the mind and the material
world
4. allowed a scientist to be a
practicing Christian
5. allowed the scientist to use
reason and faith in the
search for truth
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
Francis Bacon’s major contribution to early modern
science lay in
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
his creation of a working
scientific method, based on
induction
the thoroughness of his
research, which set an
example for younger scholars
his unwillingness to
compromise his views, even
when highly criticized
the work he did as president
of the Royal Society
his publication of Discourse
on Method
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
The new science was readily accepted in the
seventeenth and early eighteenth century because of
1. support from the Roman
Catholic Church
2. the direct application of
science to the interests of a
European elites and rulers
3. the ability of all classes to
use science
4. the increased
opportunities provided for
women
5. the harmony of religion
and science
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
Spinoza differed with all other philosophers of
his day about the
1. natural inferiority of
women as scientists
2. dangers to European
civilization of the Jewish
faith
3. Copernican view of the
universe
4. divinity of the material
universe
5. rational elements of
Christianity
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
At the time of his death, Pascal was attempting to
1. demonstrate the validity of
Descartes’ dualism
2. establish an alternative
scientific society in France
3. prove that a scientist can
be a practicing Christian
and vice versa
4. sell commercially his
calculating machine
5. refute the idea of a
heliocentric universe
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
The long-range significance of the Royal Society
and Royal Academy was to
1. encourage scientists to
work cooperatively
2. provide many military
inventions to the kings of
England and France
3. help scientists win patents
for their inventions
4. establish schools of science
for aspiring young scholars
5. provide a venue for female
scientists
20%
1
20%
2
20%
20%
3
4
20%
5
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All of the following were important precursors to