Volksgemeinschaft (a national community)
http://www.forvo.com/word/volksgemeinschaft/
Untermenschen - German for under man or sub-human; is a term that became
infamous when the Nazi ideology used it to describe ‘ inferior people’ such as
Communists, Bolsheviks, Jews, Gypsies, and Slavic peoples (including Poles,
Serbs, Belarusians, Russians). It also applied to black people and Mulattos
Führerprinzip - Hitler’s so-called Leader Principle, ultimate authority rested with
him and extended downward. At each level, the superior was to give the orders,
the subordinates to follow them to the letter.
http://www.forvo.com/word/f%C3%BChrerprinzip/
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT:
1. Fascism - a form of aggressive and racist nationalism, combining
militarism with a strong authoritarian leader to impose order on society.
• Belief that the nation is more important than the individual
• A nation became great by expanding its territory and building up its
military
• Fascist governments control every aspect of life (education, media
and even sports) and forced people to put the needs of the country
first.
• It is considered anti-democratic and anti-socialist.
• Unlike Communism, Fascism didn’t believe in equality, instead
believing that men were superior and Aryan Germans a superior race.
KD: Sources A, B, C on p. 114 - 115, main message / intimidation affect:
This Nazi poster from the
1928 election reads
‘Break the Dawes chains’.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD ANSWERS:
3. DAP and NSDAP : p. 115
• National Socialist German Workers' Party (German:
Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei, abbreviated
NSDAP, commonly known as the Nazi Party
• It was a political party in Germany, founded in January, 1919 by
Anton Drexler. Hitler infiltrated it as a V-Man in 1919 and took
control of it in 1921 as it’s Führer.
• It’s predecessor, the German Workers' Party (DAP).
4. Twenty-Five Point Programme called for: p. 115
• Presented in February 1920, it was a manifesto written by Anton
Drexler and Adolf Hitler.
• It called for revising TOV, ending reparations, Lebensraum,
Volksgemeinschaft (a national community); and anti-Semitism.
http://www.forvo.com/word/volksgemeinschaft/
German Workers’ Party (DAP) in 1919:
• Hitler made speeches and wrote articles in local papers about the
party’s beliefs and ideas for a better Germany.
• He spoke passionately about Germany and the need for good leaders,
who would get revenge for Germany’s defeat in WWI.
• By 1921 he was running the party and changes its name to the
National Socialist German Workers’ Party (Nazi Party)
• He made the Swastika the Nazi symbol and used ‘Brown Shirts’ to
beat up opponents.
National Socialist German Workers' Party (NSDAP), commonly known
as the Nazi Party
In 1919 Anton Drexler, Gottfried Feder and Dietrich Eckart formed the
German Worker's Party (GPW) in Munich. The German Army was
worried that it was a left-wing revolutionary group and sent Adolf Hitler,
one of its education officers, to spy on the organization. Hitler
discovered that the party's political ideas were similar to his own. He
approved of Drexler's German nationalism and anti-Semitism but was
unimpressed with the way the party was organized. Although there as a
spy, Hitler could not restrain himself when a member made a point he
disagreed with, and he stood up and made a passionate speech on the
subject.
http://www.spartacus.schoolnet.co.uk/GERnazi.htm
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT:
5. Vőlkischer Beobachter translated as ‘People's Observer’
• It was the main official newspaper of the Nazi Party, bought by the
NSDAP in December, 1920.
• The primary aim of ‘Vőlkischer Beobachter’ was to spread the word of
Nazism and to print the propaganda of Joseph Goebbels.
• The production of ‘Vőlkischer Beobachter’ ended when Nazi Germany
collapsed in May 1945.
Pronunciation http://www.forvo.com/word/v%C3%B6lkischer_beobachter/
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD ANSWERS:
6. Hitler uses the Sturmabteilung:
• The SA or Storm Detachment was better known as the
•
•
•
•
‘Brownshirts’ or Storm Troopers.
It was the paramilitary wing of the Nazi Party.
From 1921 to 1933 the SA disrupted the meetings of
Hitler’s political opponents as well as defended the
halls where Hitler was making speeches.
According to the Nuremberg Military Tribunal (1946 - 1949), the SA was
made up of “ruffians” and “bullies”. However, it played a very important role
in the first years of the Nazi Party.
Many of the original members of the SA had opposed the Versailles Treaty,
fought the brief Bavarian Soviet and opposed the general weakness of the
Weimar government.
http://www.forvo.com/word/sturmabteilung/
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD ANSWERS:
7. The Munich (Beer Hall) Putsch, Nov 8 & 9, 1923: p. 116
• In September 1923, the Chancellor Gustav Stresemann and President
Ebert had decided that the only way Germany could proceed after
hyperinflation was to agree to work with the French and pay
reparations.
• The Nazi party had 55,000 members. With the Ruhr Crisis and
resentment toward the Weimar government, Hitler and the NSDAP
thought they could seize power.
• Their aim was to create a dictatorship with renowned General, Erich
Ludendorff as its president.
7. The Munich (Beer Hall) Putsch, Nov 8 & 9, 1923: p. 116
• Hitler and 600 of his Stormtroopers (SA) went into the conservative
political meeting led by the Bavarian Prime Minister, Gustav Kahr.
• These SA men, lead by Ernst Röhm, lined the sides of the hall in an
attempt to intimidate those in the beer hall. It is said that Hitler, once
on the speaker’s platform, shouted out the following:
"The national revolution has broken out. The hall is surrounded."
• On November 9th, Hitler started his march with his followers. By the
morning he knew that the army and police had been alerted that the
Nazis would try to take over vital buildings in Munich.
• Hitler hoped to appeal to the army and police to support him.
• With war-hero, Luderndorff leading the march, Hitler started the
march to the centre of Munich with 3,000 men.
• The Nazis were confronted by 100 armed police and soldiers who
blocked them. Shots were fired and 16 Nazis and 3 policemen were
killed.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD ANSWERS:
8. In 1924 the NSDAP was outlawed and Hitler went to prison. It turned
out to be stroke of good fortune for Hitler. Outline the efforts made to
reorganise the Nazi Party in the period called, the ‘Wilderness Years’ .
• Hitler was found guilty of treason and sentenced to 5 years in prison.
He served from March 1924 until his release on February 27, 1925.
• Hitler had time to write Mein Kampf and it gave him a reputation as a
man whose ideas might be able to help Germany become great.
• Hitler reconsidered his tactics and decided to use the Weimar
system with his policy of legality (through elections.)
• The Party was reorganised and an index of all members was created.
• Hitler persuaded Bavarian Chancellor to lift the ban on the NSDAP in
1925.
• The Schutzstaffel (SS) was created as the bodyguard for Hitler in Nov.
http://www.forvo.com/word/schutzstaffel/
8. ‘Wilderness Years’:
• At the Bamberg Party Conference in February, 1926, Hitler asserted
his ideology and the Führerprinzip. It was a principle that within the
Nazi Party, Hitler possessed all power and authority and extended
downward. At each level, the superior was to give the orders, the
subordinates to follow them to the letter.
http://www.forvo.com/word/f%C3%BChrerprinzip/
• Gauleiter (Gaue) - were set up in the 35 electoral districts of Weimar
Germany. A regional leader in Nazi Germany would serve as a
provincial governor. http://www.forvo.com/search/Gauleiter/
• Hitler attempted to demote the SA.
• The disappointment at the ballot box in May 1928 for the Reichstag,
acted as a stimulus for further reorganisation.
• Hitler tried to target and involve various groups. In 1926 the Hitler
Youth and Nazi Students’ Association were established.
8. ‘Wilderness Years’:
• By 1928 Nazi, organisations were set up for doctors and teachers.
• By 1930, to draw discontented peasants into the
movement, Agrar Politischer Apparat
(AA - Agricultural Affairs Bureau of the NSDAP)
was founded by Walther Darré.
http://www.forvo.com/search/Agrar%20Politischer%20Apparat/
8. ‘Wilderness Years’:
• Joseph Goebbels was a German politician and
Reich Minister of Propaganda in Nazi Germany
from 1933 to 1945. Goebbels was highly efficient
at spreading the Nazi message. He and Hitler
believed that the best way to reach what they called
‘the masses’ was by appealing to their feelings
rather than by rational argument. Goebbels
produced posters, leaflets, films and radio broadcasts;
he organised rallies; he set up ‘photo opportunities’.
• Despite these shifting policies and priorities, there was no electoral
breakthrough for the Nazis. Even after all their hard work, in 1928 they were
still a fringe minority party who had the support of less than 3% of the
population. They were the smallest party with fewer seats (12) than the
Communists (54). The prosperity of the Stresemann years and Stresemann’s
success in foreign policy made Germans uninterested in extreme politics.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
Support for the Nazis
and Communists,
and unemployment,
1928–32.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
• Although their anti-Semitic policies gained them some support, the Nazis
failed to win over the workers. Workers with radical political views were more
likely to support the Communists.
• The majority of workers supported the socialist Social Democratic Party
(SPD), as they had done in every election since 1919.
• The Nazis found that they gained more support from groups such as the
peasant farmers in northern Germany and middle-class shopkeepers and
small business people in country towns - who were not sharing in Weimar
Germany’s economic prosperity.
• The Nazis highlighted the importance of the peasants (35% of population) in
their plans for Germany, promising to help agriculture if they came to power.
They praised the peasants as racially pure Germans through Nazi propaganda,
and portrayed city-dwellers as immoral and corrupted by Jews.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD:
1. Alfred Hugenberg / DNVP: p. 118
• The German National People's Party (DNVP) was formed in 1919. This
right-wing party opposed the TOV and was critical of the power of
the trade unions. Led by the wealthy newspaper magnate, Alfred
Hugenberg, the DNVP won 66 seats in the Reichstag in the 1920
General Election. This grew to 103 in December, 1924.
• The DNVP campaigned against the Locarno Treaty and the Young
Plan. However, by 1930 the more extreme Nazi Party became the
country's leading right-wing party and by 1933 they only has 52 seats.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
A Nazi election poster from 1928,
saying ‘Work, freedom and bread!
Vote for the National Socialists.’
KD:
3. Wall Street Crash / Depression - focus to the Nazis:
• Müller‘s (1928–1930) Grand Coalition fell apart and subsequent
governments were minority administrations that lacked Reichstag
support - further polarising German politics
• Popularity rose for those (Nazis) who offered radical solutions to
economic problems (especially to German industry).
• Was a ‘trigger’ that helped undermine democracy in Germany.
• By 1933 over 6 million Germans were unemployed (33%). The
bedrock of growing Nazi support was established in those who
thought ‘they might be next’ and lose their job - the Mittlestand
(lower middle class). http://www.forvo.com/word/mittelstand/
• The KPD (Communist Party) and SPD (Social Democratic Party) were
significantly weakened from 1928 - 1932.
• Germans broke with their voting ranks and the Nazis garnered
support with their refrain - ‘destroy the TOV.’
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
KD:
4. Heinrich Brüning - direction he took Germany:
• Chancellor as the government shifted from
parliamentary to presidential government.
• In July 1930 his Centre Party’s Financial
Bill was defeated. Brüning then attempted
legislation by decree using Article 48, but
was again defeated in the Reichstag.
• The Reichspresident, Paul von Hindenburg
dissolved the Reichstag and called for
an election in Sept. 1930.
• The Financial Bill was passed by presidential
decree and Wiemar democracy was in danger.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD:
5. Joseph Goebbels - impact of Nazi election success in 1930: p. 120
• Goebbels was instrumental in the planning and execution of the Nazi
electioneering programme.
• Elections to the Reichstag rose from 12 seats in 1928 to 107 in 1930
(an increase from 800,000 votes to 6.4 million), second only to
SPD/SDP (143).
• The 1930 election victory acted as a stimulus for membership. From
September to December 1930, nearly 100,000 new members joined
the NSDAP, with particular expansion of peasants in the countryside
and the Agrar Politischer Apparat (AA). http://www.forvo.com/search/Agrar%20Politischer%20Apparat/
• Hitler further gained ‘legitimacy’ through his crackdown on the more
radical party members of the SA, such as Strasser and Stennes in
1931. It helped Hitler by showing that his leadership was committed
to ‘LEGALITY’.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
A poster for a 1931 midsummer festival
organised by the Nazi Party. The poster
proclaims ‘Against Versailles’.
Table 6.1, p. 121 - Decline of the Reichstag, 1930 - 1932:
6. Suggests - Democracy and the Weimar government:
1930 1931 1932
Days the Reichstag Sat
94
42
13
Laws passed by Reichstag
98
34
5
Emergency Decrees Issued
using Article 48
5
44
66
• Democracy was being usurped by Article 48 and presidential decree.
There were 44 decrees in 1931 as compared to 5 in 1930. The inability
to solve Germany’s economic problems through Parliamentary
legislation opened the door to alternative governing methods,
ultimately cumulating in ‘legal’ abuse of power … by Hitler.
• Political parties represented different interests and were not cooperating.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
A Nazi election poster from July 1932. The
Nazis proclaim ‘We build!’ and promise to
provide work, freedom and bread. They
accuse the opposing parties of planning to
use terror, corruption, lies and other
strategies as the basis for their
government.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
Paul von Hindenburg was a senior military
figure in Germany during World War I and
2nd president of the Weimar Republic
(1925 - 1934).
Chancellors of Germany, 1925 - 1934:
• Hans Luther (1925–1926)
• Wilhelm Marx (1926–1928)
• Hermann Müller (1928–1930)
• Heinrich Brüning (1930–1932)
• Franz von Papen (1932)
• General Kurt von Schleicher (1932–1933)
• Adolf Hitler (1933–1934)
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD:
8. Nazi election success - met with resistance by 1932: p. 122 - 123
• Paul von Hindenburg was re-elected in 1932 with 53% of the vote
compared to Hitler’s 36.8%.
• Hindenburg instituted the Emergency Decree of April 1932. It banned
the SA and SS.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KD:
9. Roles - Franz von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher played in
bringing Hitler to power: p. 122 - 123
• Political in-fighting between Minister of Interior, General Groener and
General von Schleicher resulted in a political agreement between
Hitler and von Schleicher in May 1932:
 Hitler accepted a role in the new presidential cabinet.
 Brüning (1930–1932) was replaced as Chancellor by Franz von Papen
and von Schleicher was named Minister of Defense.
• A ban was lifted on the SA and SS in June, 1932. In July the Preußenschlag
(Prussian coup - http://www.forvo.com/word/preu%C3%9Fenschlag/) took
place after clashes during the Bloody Sunday of Altona, Hamburg
(July 17). The Communist Rotfrontkämpferbund (Red Front-Fighters)
met in street clashes with the SA.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
SOURCE 46, p. 156, Walsh Book
The majority of Germans never voted for the Nazis.
The Nazis made it clear they would destroy democracy and all who
stood in their way. Why then didn’t their enemies join together to stop
Hitler? . . . Had the Communists and Socialists joined forces they would
probably have been strong enough both in the Reichstag and on the
streets to have blocked the Nazis. The fact was that by 1932–3 there
were simply not enough Germans who believed in democracy and
individual freedom to save the Weimar Republic.
S Williams, in The Rise and Fall of Hitler’s Germany, published in 1986,
assesses the reasons for Hitler’s success.
• Prussia was governed by a coalition of the Social Democrats, Catholic
Centre and German Democrats from 1919 - 1932.
• From 1921 to 1925, coalition governments included the German People's
Party.
• The Nazi Party gained more and more influence and popular support,
especially from the lower middle class starting in 1930.
• The East Prussian Otto Braun, who was Prussian minister-president almost
continuously from 1920 to 1932.
• Many historians regard the Prussian government during this time as far
more successful than that of Weimar Germany as a whole. This system was
destroyed by the Preußenschlag (Prussian coup http://www.forvo.com/word/preu%C3%9Fenschlag/) of Reich Chancellor
Franz von Papen.
• The Prussian government was deposed on 20 July 1932, under the pretext
that it lost control of public order in Prussia (during the Bloody Sunday of
Altona, Hamburg). Defence Minister, General Kurt von Schleicher
manufactured evidence that the Prussian police, under Braun's orders,
were favouring the Communist Rotfrontkämpferbund (Red Front-Fighters)
in street clashes with the SA as part of a plan for a Marxist revolution.
President Paul von Hindenburg imposed a presidential decree with Reich
control over Prussia.
Federal States of
the Weimar
Republic
As Prussian Prime Minister, Otto
Braun led a Social Democratic
(SPD) - Center Party coalition from
1920 to 1932. Braun was one of a
few Weimar politicians who
offered an alternative to far right
groups like the Nazis, and he was
also the most popular pro-Weimar
politician. Prussia achieved the
greatest stability during Braun's
years in office, making Prussia the
bulwark of the Weimar Republic.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
KD ANSWERS:
2 - 1. Discussion Point, p. 124 - Nazis use electoral success:
• By July 1932, the Nazis secured 37.3% of the vote and 230 seats
in the Reichstag. This proved that the Nazis had a mandate and
legitimacy from the German people, which von Papen and von
Schleicher 'wanted to use' against the left (Communist KPD).
• The Nazis were an attractive ally because they were a mass
movement with a broad base, when other parties (and the
Reichstag) were losing support.
• The Nazis attracted the Mittlestand (lower middle class), as well
as those of other parties, especially the DNVP.
Bavarian
People's Party
(BVP) and
Catholic
Centre Party were both
Catholic
political
parties, one
from Bavaria
and the
Centre party
from Prussia.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
2 - 2. Discussion Point, p. 124 - Nazis use electoral success:
• Even though the Nazis struggled to win urban (city), working
class voters (who tended to support the KPD and SPD), they
were the only party that was considered ‘national’.
• Protestants favoured the Nazis but the unemployed and
Catholics did NOT (Catholic Centre Party).
• The Nazis were seen as a ‘protest party’ with lofty ideals
(Volksgemeinschaft) offering a new and improved Germany
based on traditional values, economic revival and national
salvation (pride). For many, a vote for the Nazis was really a
vote against the Weimar Republic.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
2 - 3. Discussion Point, p. 124 - Nazis use electoral success:
• The Nazis relied on we today call, ‘negative campaigning.’ Their
policy was deliberately vague, focusing more on style and
emotion rather than substantive policy.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
KD ANSWERS:
3 - 1. From 1930, government / ‘deals’ / Hitler out-manoeuvres von Papen
and General Kurt von Schleicher:
• In August 1932 van Papen and Hitler held talks about the Nazis
joining the government. Hitler demanded one position Chancellor.
• After SA men were convicted of murdering Communists in
Upper Silesia, Hitler persuaded van Papen to commute their
death sentences to life in prison - another example of Nazism's
use of violence, and influence over van Papen.
• Negotiations between Hitler and van Papen failed. The
Reichstag was dissolved on Sept 12th after a vote of no
confidence on van Papen’s government, 512 to 42.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
KD ANSWERS:
3 - 2. Hitler out-manoeuvres von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher:
• The Nazis lost 34 seats in the November elections of 1932 but
democratic politics already were undermined and the election
reinforced the political stalemate.
• Hindenburg wanted to rule by decree and refused to consider
Hitler for Chancellor until the NSDAP had a majority in the
Reichstag.
• van Papen was dismissed and von Schleicher
appointed Dec 3rd.
• von Schleicher attempted to draw the Nazis into
a coalition by offering Vice-Chancellorship to
Gregor Strasser. http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/gregor_strasser.htm
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
KD ANSWERS:
3 - 3. Hitler out-manoeuvres von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher:
• Business leaders (Paul Reusch and Kurt von Schröder) were
determined to to see an authoritarian government and played an
important role in bringing Hitler and van Papen together once agian in
Jan 1933.
• Business leaders were joined by the Agrarian League and industrilaist
organisations. They had an impact on Hindenburg, who saw that von
Schleicher could not get support to form a coalition government.
• Army leaders told von Hindenburg that they would be unable to deal
with both the communists militia (Communist Rotfrontkämpferbund
-Red Front-Fighters) and the SA, and prefered working with Hitler to
gain the support of his SA.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
KD ANSWERS:
3 - 3. Hitler out-manoeuvres von Papen and General Kurt von Schleicher:
• Conservative political and economic elites, including Hugenberg,
contibuted to money to the Nazis.
• von Schleicher was dismissed on Jan 27 and Hitler appointed on Jan
30th. Hindenburg was swayed to appoint Hitler because the Nazis had
a popular broad base of support and a new government could be
installed peacefully.
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
2. Explain how Hitler became Chancellor in January 1933.
5. Groups instrumental to Hitler’s rise:
Deutschland erwache
http://www.forvo.com/search/Erwache/
Adolf Hitler - speech (English Subtitles)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nH0Et56Hxt4
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT:
Book by Adolf Hitler
Zweites Buch is an unedited transcript of Adolf Hitler's thoughts on
foreign policy written in 1928; it was written after Mein Kampf and was
not published in his lifetime (1961).
Pronounce - Zweites Buch
http://www.forvo.com/word/zweites_buch/
TOPIC: Intro to Rise of the Nazis - Origins to 1928
OBJECTIVES: 1. Describe how support for the Nazis grew in the late 1920s and early 1930s.
KNOWLEDGE DEVELOPMENT:
Weltanschauung - world view of the Nazis promoted by Alfred Rosenberg
and Deitrich Eckart. Echart published Vőlkischer Beobachter and
Rosenberg was a leading Nazi thinker who helped create the pseudoscientific philosophy that the party used to justify anti-Semitism.
http://www.forvo.com/word/weltanschauung/

2. Web – A2 GCE Hist 6HI03 – Rise of the Nazis