The Rubaiyat
MICHAEL
NADEA
AD
The Rubaiyat
Time bringeth swift to end
The rout men keep;
Death's wolf is nigh to rend
These silly sheep.
See, how in pride they go
With lifted head,
Tell Fate with a sudden blow
Smiteth them dead.
~
Thou who lovest, life a crow,
Winter’s chill and winter’s snow,
Ever exile from the vale’s
Roses red, and nightingales:
Take this moment to thy heart!
When the moment shall depart,
Long thou ‘It seek it as It flies
With a hundred lamp s and
eyes
~
The heavenly rider passed:
The dust rose in the air;
He sped; but the dusthe cast
Yet hangeth there.
Straight forward thy vision be,
And gaze not left or right;
His dust is here, and he
In the Infinite.
Literary Terms Connection
Imagery,
Jalal Al-Din Rumi examples imagery in his poem by stating …
“Thou who lovest, life a crow,
Winter’s chill and winter’s snow,”
It puts a cold winter day and snowfall into your mind while your reading,
also when he states life a crow, you imagine a crow soaring through the
cold winter air.
Literary Terms Connection
Tone,
Jala Al-Din Rumi shows a forceful tone. His tone throughout
the poem changes because there are 3 different sections of the poem,
during the poems his forceful tone stays throughout.
“Take this moment to thy heart!
When the moment shall depart,”
Literary Terms Connection
Third Person Narrative,
Jalal Al-Din Rumi speaks throughout his poem in third person
narrative, an example from the poem is,
“He sped; but the dusthe cast
Yet hangeth there.”
Literary Terms Connection
Hyperbole
Jalal Al-Din Rumi shows a hyperbole by stating
“Tell Fate with a sudden blow,”
As in you cant tell fate anything because it isn't
a living thing, there for Jalal exaggerated the fact of
fate.
Analysis
The Rubaiyat is three separate poems in a huge poem,
but connect in a way that shows death and what
people should do and react to it.