EXAM PREPARATION
APUSH
MRS. BAKER
Overview of the Exam
 Designed to evaluate the knowledge, understanding,
and thinking and writing skills that would be
demonstrated in a year-long introductory-level
college course in U.S. History.
 Combination of factual knowledge and ability to
analyze historical questions in a critical manner is
the major key to success of the exam.
The Exam
 3 hours and 5 minutes
 Consists of 2 sections –
 Multiple Choice – (50%)
80 questions
 55 minutes


Free Response –(50%)
Part A: 1 DBQ – (22.5%)
 60 minutes
 Part B: 2 Standard essay questions – (22.5%)
 70 minutes (35 each essay)

Section 1: Multiple Choice
 Breakdown of questions:
 Pre-Columbian to 1789 – 20%
 1790 to 1914 – 45%
 1915 to present – 35%
Expect only a few questions from the period after the early 1980s.
 And even fewer from the past 10 years.

 Theme breakdown:
 Political institutions, behavior, and public policy – 35%
 Social change, cultural and intellectual developments – 40%
 Diplomacy and international relations – 15%
 Economic developments – 10%
Section 2: The Essays (3)
 Total section time – 130 minutes
 DBQ time breakdown
Read the document-based questions – 15 min. (mandatory)
 Written response – 45 min. (advised)


FRQ time breakdown
Part B – to 1865
 Plan essay 1 – 5 min. (advised)
 Written response – 30 min. (advised)
 Part C – after 1865
 Plan essay 1 – 5 min. (advised)
 Written response – 30 min. (advised)

1492 - 1700
Major Themes
 The differences between the Southern, New England, and Middle colonies
 Characteristics of the Puritan experience
 “City Upon a Hill”
 Origins of Slavery
 Indentured servitude and its role in the colonial economy
 The slow evolution from separate colonies to unify by 1763
 Economic and political relations between Great Britain and the colonies to 1763
 Impact of the colonial wars on the colonies on their relationship with Britain
 Mercantilism and the colonies
Terms to Know

Jamestown

Anne Hutchinson

Captain John Smith

Quakers

Plymouth Colony

William Penn

Pilgrims

Mercantilism

Puritans

Navigation Acts

Mayflower Compact
MA Bay Colony

Triangle Trade


John Winthrop

Halfway Covenant

“City Upon a Hill”

First Great Awakening

VA House of Burgesses

Jonathon Edwards

Proprietorship

Salem Witch Trials

George Calvert

John Peter Zenger

Maryland Act of Toleration (1649)

French & Indian War (1756 – 1763)

Bacon’s Rebellion

Albany Plan of Union

Headright System

Treaty of Paris (1763)

Indentured Servitude

Salutary Neglect

Roger Williams
Important Dates: Foundations of America
Southern Colonies
Northern Colonies

1585 – Raleigh founds “Lost Colony” at Roanoke

1620 – Pilgrims sail on the Mayflower to Plymouth Bay

1607 – Virginia Colony founded at Jamestown

1624 – Dutch found New Netherland

1612 – Rolfe perfects tobacco culture

1630 – Puritans found Massachusetts Bay Colony

1635 – 1636 – Roger Williams convicted of heresy and
found Rhode Island colony

1635 – 1638 – Connecticut and New Haven colonies
founded

1638 – Anne Hutchinson banished from Massachusetts
colony

1639 – Connecticut Fundamental Orders drafted

1664 - England seizes New Netherland from Dutch

1681 – William Penn founds Pennsylvania colony

1619 – First Africans arrive in Jamestown


Virginia House of Burgesses established
1624 – Virginia becomes royal colony

1634 – Maryland founded

1670 – Carolina colony created


1712 – North Carolina formally separates from
South Carolina
1733 – Georgia colony founded
Important Dates: Social Changes
 1693 – College of William and Mary founded
 1701 – Yale College founded
 1734 – Jonathon Edwards begins Great Awakening
 1734 – 1735 – Zenger free-press trial in New York
 1738 – George Whitefield spreads Great Awakening
 1746 – Princeton College founded
Important Dates: French and English Colonies Collide

1608 – Champlain colonizes Quebec for France

1682 – La Salle explores the Mississippi River to the Gulf of Mexico

1689 – 1697 – King William’s War

1702 – 1713 – Queen Anne’s War

1718 – French found New Orleans

1744 – 1748 – King George’s War

1754 – Washington battles French on frontier


1754 – 1763 – Seven Year’s War


Albany Congress
French and Indian War
1763 – Treaty of Paris


Pontiac’s uprising
Proclamation of 1763
Columbian Exchange
1763 - 1783
Major Themes

The short- and long-term causes of the American Revolution

Colonial assemblies as leaders against Great Britain

The Revolution was formed by changes in British colonial policy in the 1763-1776 period

The Revolution was brought on by tight economic controls and loose political controls.

The ideas/ideals expressed in the Declaration of Independence.

Several different interpretations by historians on the causes of the American Revolution.

Was the Treaty of Paris (1783) a victory for the U. S.?

How had the 13 separate colonies become similar by the time of the Revolution?

The American Revolution as a democratic revolution turned into an aristocratic government by the Constitution.

The American Revolution as a question of home rule and who should rule at home.

The American Revolution as a revolutionary event --> consider the economic and social changes associated with the
Revolution.

Was the Revolution avoidable?
Terms to Know

Proclamation of 1763

Intolerable [Coercive] Acts (1774)

Sugar Act (1764)

Quebec Act (1774)

Virtual representation

First Continental Congress (1774)

Stamp Act (1765)

Articles of Confederation

Quartering Act (1765)

Second Continental Congress (1775)

Virginia Resolves

Common Sense

Stamp Act Congress

Lexington & Concord

Sons of Liberty

Olive Branch Petition

Writs of assistance

Saratoga

French Alliance of 1778

Loyalists (Tories)

Yorktown (1781)

Treaty of Paris (1783)

Declaratory Act (1766)

Townshend Acts (1767)

Sam Adams

Boston Massacre (1770)

Patrick Henry

John Dickinson

Committees of Correspondence

Boston Tea Party (1773)
Important Dates: Causes of the American Revolution

1650 – First Navigation Laws to control
colonial commerce

1763 – Seven Year’s War

1764 – Sugar Act


1768 – British troops occupy Boston

1770 – Boston Massacre


1772 – Committees of correspondence
formed

1773 – British East India Company
granted tea monopoly
1765 – Quartering Act


Stamp Act
Stamp Act Congress

1766 – Declaratory Act

1767 – Townshend Acts
All Townshend Acts except tea tax
repealed


1774 – “Intolerable Acts”



Boston Tea Party
Quebec Act
First Continental Congress
1775 – Battle of Lexington and Concord
Important Dates: American Revolution
 1775 – Battles of Lexington &
Concord
 1778 – Formation of the French-
American alliance


Second Continental Congress

Battle of Bunker Hill

King George III formally proclaims
colonies in rebellion

Failed invasion of Canada
 1776 – Paine’s Common Sense

Declaration of Independence

Battle of Trenton
 1777 – Battle of Saratoga
Battle of Saratoga
 1781 – French and Americans force
Cornwallis to surrender at
Yorktown
 1783 – Treaty of Paris
British
American Colonies
1776 - 1800
Major Themes

Enlightenment concepts and the Constitution.

How critical was the “Critical Period”?

Compare and contrast the Declaration of Independence, the Articles of Confederation, and the Constitution.

Origins of the ideas of separation of powers, written constitutions, and federalism.

Areas of agreement at the Constitutional Convention.

Bill of Rights: provisions and meanings.

Slavery and the Constitution.

Failures of the Constitution led to the evolution of political parties.

Liberty versus law and order in the 1790s.

Hamilton’s economic program.

Thomas Jefferson versus Alexander Hamilton.

Differences between the Democratic-Republicans and the Federalists.

Compare 1763-1776 with 1783-1800 in regard to the relationship between the central government and the colonies or states.

Significance of these election years: 1796 & 1800.

The “Revolution” of 1800.

Loose versus strict construction as a matter of sectional or political interest.

The significance of George Washington’s “Farewell Address”.
Key Terms

Articles of Confederation

Shay’s Rebellion

Annapolis Convention


Judiciary Act (1789)

Report on Public Credit (1790)
Northwest Ordinance of 1787

Report on Manufactures (1791)

Philadelphia Convention (1787)

“Citizen” Genet

James Madison

Alexander Hamilton

Jay Treaty (1794)

Virginia Plan

Whiskey Rebellion (1794)

New Jersey Plan
Connecticut Plan

Washington’s “Farewell Address” (1796)


3/5s Compromise

Democratic-Republican Party

Federalists

XYZ Affair

Anti-Federalists

Strict constructionist

Alien & Sedition Acts (1798)

Loose constructionist

KY & VA Resolutions (1799)

Federalist Papers (esp. #10)

Revolution of 1800
1800 – 1824
THOMAS JEFFERSON
JAMES MADISON
JAMES MONROE
Major Themes

Decline and death of the Federalist Party.

“Era of Good Feeling”.

Marshall and his Supreme Court decisions.

What caused Jeffersonian Democracy to develop?

Compare the Second Party System with the First.

Rise and development of political parties --> economic, social, and geographical characteristics and leaders.

Hamilton’s economic program created the political issues for the next 50 years.

The positions, rationale, issues, and spokesmen for the sections on the following political topics: tariff, banking, internal improvements, expansion, and
slavery.

The significance of the 1824 election.

The War of 1812 as a second War for Independence.

Foreign policy united and divided Americans between 1800 and 1824.

The interests of the West were satisfied by neither the Jeffersonian nor the Federalists between 1789 and 1815.

Provisions and impact of the Monroe Doctrine.

Clay’s “American System”.
Key Terms

Louisiana Purchase

War of 1812

Lewis & Clark

Impressment

Judiciary Act (1801)

Hartford Convention (1814)

“Midnight Judges”

Treaty of Ghent (1814)

Judicial review

Battle of New Orleans

John Marshall

“Era of Good Feeling”

Marbury v. Madison (1803)

Tariff of 1816

Fletcher v. Peck (1810)

Rush-Bagot Agreement (1817)

McCulloch v. Maryland (1819)

Adams-Onis Treaty (1819)

Dartmouth College v. Woodward (1819)
Cohens v. Virginia (1821)

Panic of 1819

Gibbons v. Ogden (1824)


Missouri Compromise of 1820

Aaron Burr

Monroe Doctrine (1823)

Embargo Act (1807)

Erie Canal

Macon’s Bill #2 (1810)

Robert Fulton

War Hawks

Eli Whitney

John C. Calhoun (SC)

Lowell System

Henry Clay (KY)

Denmark Vessey (1822)
The Age of Jackson
1824 – 1840
JOHN QUINCY ADAMS
ANDREW JACKSON
MARTIN VAN BUREN
Antebellum Reform
Westward Expansion &
Sectionalism
1830S – 1860
WILLIAM H. HARRISON
JOHN TYLER
JAMES K. POLK
ZACHARY TAYLOR
MILLARD FILLMORE
FRANKLIN PIERCE
JAMES BUCHANAN
The American Civil War &
Reconstruction
1860 – 1877
ABRAHAM LINCOLN
ANDREW JOHNSON
ULYSSES S. GRANT
RUTHERFORD B. HAYES
Closing the Frontier &
The New South
The Gilded Age
JAMES GARFIELD
CHESTER ARTHUR
GROVER CLEVELAND
BENJAMIN HARRISON
GROVER CLEVELAND
WILLIAM MCKINLEY
American Imperialism
WILLIAM MCKINLEY
THEODORE ROOSEVELT
WILLIAM HOWARD TAFT
WOODROW WILSON