Chapter 11 Clubs
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The Development of Clubs
Types of Clubs
Key Players in the Club Industry
Club Management
Club Food and Beverage
Management
The Golf Course Superintendent
The Golf Professional
The Golf Shop
Trends
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The Development of Clubs
• Private clubs are places where
members gather for social,
recreational, professional, and
fraternal reasons.
• Many clubs are designed around a
housing development where the
neighborhood can utilize the
services of the club (golf, tennis,
pool).
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
The Development of Clubs
• Many of today’s clubs are
adaptations of their predecessors,
mostly from England and Scotland.
• The Royal and Ancient Golf Club of
St. Andrews, Scotland, founded in
1758, is recognized as the birthplace
of golf.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Size and Scope of Club Industry
• 14,000 clubs in America:
– Country and City Clubs.
– 6,000 Country Clubs.
• When the total resources of all the clubs
are considered (land, buildings,
equipment, thousands of employees,
etc.) we are talking billions of dollars of
economic impact.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Country Clubs
• Nearly all country clubs
have one or more golf
courses, a clubhouse,
locker rooms, lounges, bars,
restaurants, and most have
banquet facilities.
• Monthly dues range from
$100 to $1,500, with the
average being about $250
to $350.
• Some country clubs charge
for an initiation fee as much
as $250,000!
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Country Clubs
• Country clubs have two or more types of
membership.
– Full membership enables members to
use all the facilities all the time.
– Social membership only allows members
to use the social facilities.
– Other forms of membership can include
weekday and weekend memberships.
– The more exclusive the club, the fewer
the types of membership.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
City Clubs
• Predominantly business oriented.
• Vary in size, location, type of facility,
and services offered.
• Some of the older, established clubs
own their own buildings; others lease
space.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Other Types of Clubs
• Professional Clubs: For people in the same
profession.
• Social Clubs: Allow members to enjoy one
another’s company; members represent many
different professions, yet they have similar
socioeconomic backgrounds.
• Athletic Clubs: Give city workers and residents
an opportunity to work out, swim, play squash
and/or racquetball, and so on.
• Dining Clubs: Generally located in large city
office buildings.
• University Clubs: Private clubs for alumni or
alumnae.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Other Types of Clubs
• Military Clubs: Cater to noncommissioned
officers and enlisted officers.
• Yacht Clubs: Provide members with moorage
slips, where their boats are kept secure.
• Fraternal Clubs: Include many special
organizations, such as the Veterans of Foreign
Wars, Elks, and Shriners.
• Proprietary Clubs: Operate on a for-profit
basis. Owned by corporations or individuals;
individuals wanting to become members
purchase a membership, not a share in the club.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Key Players in the Club Industry
• ClubCorp:
– Founded in 1957.
– World leader in delivering premier golf, private
club, and resort experiences.
• WCI Communities:
– Recognized leader in its commitment to green
building and sustainable practices.
• American Golf:
– American Golf and the Tiger Woods
Foundation formed an alliance to foster
opportunities for underprivileged youths to
learn and play golf.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Club Management
• Similar to hotel management.
– The main difference between club management
and hotel management is that with clubs the
guests feel as if they are the owners.
– Another difference is that most clubs do not
offer sleeping accommodations.
• Members pay an initiation fee and annual dues.
• Club Managers Association of America:
– Goal is to advance the profession of club
management by fulfilling the educational and
related needs of the club managers.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Figure 11-1 Core Competencies of a General Manager
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Club Management Structure
• Articles of incorporation and bylaws determine structure:
– Members
• The club president is the lead member or official in policymaking.
– Board of Directors:
• Fiscal responsibility.
• Policies and strategies.
– Executive Committee:
• Activities, grounds, and funding.
– Treasurer:
• Gives advice on financial matters.
– General Manager:
• Day-to-day operation.
• Asset management.
• Preserving and fostering the club culture.
– Secretary:
• Records minutes of meetings.
• Takes care of correspondence.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Figure 11-4
Organizational Chart of a Country Club
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Food and Beverage Management
• Similar to hotel except the owners are (once
again) the guests.
• F&B director reports to General Manager.
• Generally have a formal or semiformal
restaurant and a casual dining facility.
• Clubs may also have a function room for
catering to banquets, weddings, and other
private parties.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Golf Course Superintendent
• Key to success of the
quality and condition of
the golf course:
–
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–
–
–
Greens.
Bunkers or Traps.
Teeing surfaces.
Fairways.
Rough.
• Works with the Greens
Committee and the Golf
Committee to ensure all
the goals of the club are
met and maintained.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
The Golf Professional
• Handles all tournaments,
such as club-sponsored
fund-raisers.
• Six-figure income.
• Responsible for:
– Caddies.
– Driving range.
– Ball cleaning.
– Markers (moved back
and forth on the tees).
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
The Golf Shop
• Used to be run by the golf professional
but in recent years clubs have realized
that there is a need to upgrade the
shop and extend the range of
merchandise.
• Many shops have revenues in excess
of $1 million.
• Stocks a range of golfing equipment
from balls to clubs to clothing.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
Trends
• Some country clubs are part of an estate
development, which includes a golf course with
houses surrounding the course.
• The General Manager is very involved with the
overall operation of the total real estate
package.
• A few clubs are beginning to introduce spas as
an additional amenity for members.
• The golf professional is now more likely to be a
member of staff rather than a contract for hire.
• The golf shop is being run by the club, not the
golf professional.
Walker: Exploring the Hospitality Industry.
© 2008 Pearson Education, Upper Saddle River, NJ 07458. All Rights Reserved.
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