The Role of Professional
Associations, the Job Search,
and Resume Writing
Matthew Park
EDHE 6730
Dr. Jack Baier
Fall 2008
Why talk about professional associations?
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“At a minimum, anyone intending a serious
career in student affairs should be a member
of at least one professional association.”
(Barr, 2000)
“Active membership in professional
organizations enhances a professionals
upward mobility in student affairs.” (Ostroth,
1984)
Research indicates that CSAOs considered
affiliation with associations crucial to attaining
their current positions. (Chernow, 2003)
History of Professional Associations
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1916 – National Association of Deans of Women (NADW)
 1991 – National Association for Women in Education (NAWE)
1919 – National Association of Deans and Advisers of Men
(NADAM)
 1951 – National Association of Student Personnel Administrators
(NASPA)
1924 – National Association of Appointment Secretaries (NAAS)
 1929 – National Association of Placement and Personnel Officers
(NAPPO)
 1931 – American College Personnel Association (ACPA)
 1991 – Disaffiliated from American Association for Counseling and
Development (AACD)
1954 – National Association of Personnel Workers (NAPW)
 1994 – National Association of Student Affairs Professionals
(NASAP)
A Moment of Pause
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The Big Three
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NASPA (over 11,000 members)
ACPA (nearly 9,000 members)
NASAP
One profession, multiple associations. Any
problems?
Only 20,000 of over 50,000 student affairs
professionals at accredited intuitions in
NASPA/ACPA. Any problems?
Expansion of Professional Associations
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AACRAO (1910; 10,000 members)
ACU-I (1914; 3,200 members)
ACHA (1920; 3,000 members)
NODA (1947; 1,750 members)
NACUBO (1950; 2,500 members)
ACA (1952; 45,000 members)
ACUHO-I (1952; 6,400 members + 200 associates)
NACE (1956; 5,200 members + 3,000 associates)
NACA (1968; 1,000 members + 650 associates)
NASFAA (1968; 12,000 members)
ASJA (1987; 1,200 members)
And the list goes on…
Role of Professional Associations
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Most professional associations perform the following
functions:
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Conduct research
Publish and disseminate research, information, and opinion
Provide educational training and professional development
programs
Advocate on behalf of public policy or broad professional
issues affecting members
Assist members with career development issues
Promulgate standards for professional preparation and
practice
Create opportunities for professional peers to interact
Common Characteristics
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Legally incorporated non-profit entities.
Governing board of elected and/or appointed
individuals.
Operations are managed by volunteers.
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Relatively small office staffs to provide administrative
services.
Funded primarily through member dues, institutional
memberships, fees for programs/services,
publications, and grants.
Online presence.
International participation.
Exercise of power limited to small number of
members.
Forms of Individual Involvement
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Consumer
Member
Contributor
Volunteer
Coordinator
Governance
Benefits of Involvement
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Enhance one’s development
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Stronger sense of professional identity
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Administrative and professional skills
Gain new perspectives and knowledge
Develop leadership skills and orientation to the profession
Career placement opportunities
Colleagues and professional networks
Exchange of ideas
Opportunities for continued interactions and get-togethers
Make a contribution to the association
Help and/or influence the profession and its
direction
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Shape professional practice and accreditation standards
Basic Suggestions for Getting Started
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Assess your own situation
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Investigate associations
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Submit a program, serve on a committee, newsletter or journal
Explore other alternatives
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Attend conferences, go with someone you know, ask
questions
Volunteer
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Websites, review publications, faculty and colleagues
Join and participate
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What do you wish to accomplish? What are your talents?
What are your developmental aspirations?
As you mature professionally, your interests may change
Thoughts on multiple association affiliations
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Avoid commitments that cause you to give anything less than
your best
Observations Across the Ages
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Stages of career development
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Formative, Application, Additive, Generative
Contrasting Involvement and Expectations
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New and young professionals
Mid and seasoned professionals
Senior officers
The Job Search – Basic Steps
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Defining your search
Written application
Phone interview
In-person interview
The offer
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Placement and Networking
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Defining Your Search
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Values, skills, and abilities
Location
Type of institution
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2 year vs. 4 year
Public vs. private
Research vs. liberal arts
Large vs. small
Institutional culture and purpose
Job responsibilities and areas of interest
Search Locations and Listings
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Chronicle of Higher Education
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Paper vs. online
Higheredjobs.com
Studentaffairs.com
Higher-ed.org
NASPA and ACPA
Professional associations (national, regional, state,
local)
Diversity/multicultural registers
Search firms (Spelman & Johnson)
Institutional websites
Differences in listing locations by nature of position
Written Application
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Cover letter
Resume
References
State or institutional application
Resume Writing
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The business resume vs. the curriculum vitae
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Chronological, functional, or the combo
Content
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Sections and headings
Tailored to the position you are seeking
Responsibilities vs. accomplishments
Layout and design
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Where does the student affairs resume fit?
Length and real estate
Capitalization, bold, underline, italic, fonts, margins,
justification, spacing, bullets, tabs
Proofreading and resume services
Phone Interviews – The Long List
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Interview by committee – less than an hour.
Hints and tips:
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Prepare yourself and practice (with a friend)
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Tape yourself – listen for ums, ahs, repeated words, dead
time, other foibles (laughs, nerves, interruptions)
Use a mirror – a reflection of your personality and
confidence, remember non-verbals (dress, stand up, etc)
List potential questions (and answers)
Have at least three questions to ask them; demonstrate
your research
Create a peaceful area. No cell phone. Reduce
distractions. Bathroom before. Glass of water.
Have your resume handy (they will).
More Phone Interview Tips
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Develop a signature statement (a one or two
sentence career proclamation)
Allow the interviewer(s) to guide the
conversation but be mindful of your
contributions
Be aware of time zones
STAR interviewing (behavioral technique)
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Situation or Task, Action, Results
Thank yous
In-Person/On-Campus Interview – The
Short List
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Before you accept… interest & arrangements
Format (all day, individual, group, students,
administrators, faculty, meals, presentations)
Expect multiple interviews
Self preparation, comfort, and homework
Demonstrate your abilities – relate them to
the position
Be enthusiastic and authentic – don’t let up
Thank yous
Evaluating Offers
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Create pro/con lists for each position
Wishes, needs, expectations, and musts
Balancing challenge and support
Colleagues and personal fit
Salary, benefits, and development
opportunities
Negotiating
Location and family needs
Timeliness and holding out
Accepting the position
Placement
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Defining placement
The Placement Exchange
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NASPA, ACUHO-I, NACA, ASJA and NODA
Professional association placement events
Types of positions found at placement
Benefits and drawbacks
Where placement fits into the search process
Navigating Placement
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Research institutions and positions, talk to
colleagues and mentors
Supplies: resumes, stapler, pens, note pads, thank
yous
Message centers, interview scheduling
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More is not always better
Be prepared for over-runs
Thirty minute interviews
Keep detailed notes/records for later
Attending socials and receptions
Be a person; not an interview machine
The Importance of Networking in
Student Affairs
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Upward and downward networking
Career and personal development
Professional and personal relationships
Identity within the profession
Support and problem solving
Internship opportunities
Strategies: conventions/conferences, committees,
volunteering, introductions, mentors, talk to
everyone, maintain files/contacts
Download

The Role of Professional Associations, the Job Search, and Resume