SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY
COURSE: AFRAS 170-B 02 AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY
SPRING 2016
COURSE SCHEDULE NUMBER: 20111
Professor: Anta Anthony Merritt, Ph.D
Professor’s e-mail: amerritt@mail.sdsu.edu
Instructional Student Assistant (ISA) (This is the person to contact for make-up tests):: Lillian Hernandez
ISA’s e-mail: breeanna.hernandez@yahoo.com
Class meets: Thurs. 4-6:40 PM. Class Room: HH130
PROFESSOR’S OFFICE HOURS:
Location: Arts and Letters Bld. Room 369
Days/Times: Thurs. 2:30 -3:30 and 6:50-7:50 pm
SYLLABUS
COURSE DESCRIPTION: United States history from a Black perspective. These courses taken together (AFRAS
170-A and 170-B) satisfy the graduation requirement in American Institutions.
AFRAS 170-B explores the political, economic, and social history of people of African descent from the end of the
Civil War up to contemporary times. Emphasis will be placed on the role played by Black people in the foundation
and development of America. Course will also include limited analysis of historical events in Africa and the African
Diaspora.
REQUIRED TEXT: African Americans, A Concise History, 5 th edition, by D. Hine, et. al.
COURSE LEARNING OUTCOMES : The main objective of this course is to enable the student to grasp the
fullness of the history of Blacks in the Americas. To accomplish this, the student will have learned the following
general, and specific themes & topics at the end of this course:
GENERAL THEMES & TOPICS:
1) Identify, use and analyze major themes, issues, and concerns of Africana people
2) Identify key features of an Africana response to living in the world; an Africana world-view
3) Identify and discuss Africana People’s history and culture.
SPECIFIC THEMES & TOPICS:
1) Radical, or Black Reconstruction
2) Change from slave labor to “free”, or wage labor
3) Interaction between Native Americans and Blacks in America
4) Post Reconstruction/Redemption politics
5) The Black Migrations and Black urban politics
6) The Harlem Renaissance; the Marcus Garvey Movement
7) Black participation in the military
8) An analysis of the struggle against institutionalized racism
9) An examination of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements
10) Selected topics on Africa and the Black Diaspora
11) American Institutions required material, at it related to African Americans, to include:
*13th, 14th, and 15th Constitutional Amendments
*Hayes-Tilden Compromise of 1877
*Share Crop/Crop lein System
*Great Depression/FDR New Deal Policies
* 1960s Era Civil Rights /Voting Rights Laws
*Politics of the 2008 Presidential election
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COURSE METHODOLOGY: The course will employ various methods (lecture, power point, films, class
discussions and (time and class size permitting) student presentations to promote informed and analytical thinking
about the nature and scope of American history as seen through the experience of Black people.
GRADING POLICY: Your final grade in this course will be based on this percentage system. It is based on the
total points possible for the course, which is 400 points. In some semesters the total points possible will be 350;
see Point Distribution below :
I DO NOT “ROUND UP” PERCENTAGES-NO EXCEPTIONS. To get an A, for example, the lowest possible
percentage must be a WHOLE 94%, nothing less (a 93. 75% for example would be an A-)
Letter Grade Assignments
Percent
Letter Grade
94 - 100
A
90 - 93
A-
87 - 89
B+
83 - 86
B
80 - 82
B-
77 - 79
C+
73 - 76
C
70 - 72
C-
67 - 69
D+
63 - 66
D
60 - 62
D-
< 60
F
THERE MAY BE EXTRA CREDIT OFFERED FOR THIS COURSE; THIS IS NOT A GIVEN.
POINT DISTRIBUTION:
This course is comprised of four tests. Each test is worth 100 points. In some semesters, test #3 will be worth 50
points-all other tests will remain worth 100 points
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TEST INFORMATION:
1. Tests are multiple choice/true false. Each test is equally weighted in terms of points; no test will be dropped.
2. You will be provided with a study guide for each test, posted on Blackboard.
3. Power point will be presented for the lectures and reading assignments, and will be posted on BB before lectures.
4. All tests require a #882 green and white scantron and pencil. All earphones and electronic devices are strictly
prohibited during tests, to include phones, laptops, etc. Anyone who violates this policy will receive an F for that
test.
5. Missed tests must be made up upon arrangement with Instructional Student Assistant.
INSTRUCTIONAL STUDENT ASSISTANT (ISA):
This course has an Instructional Student Assistant. The role of the ISA is:
1. To conduct the scheduled tests
2. To conduct make-up tests for students who miss the scheduled exam. Make-ups will be held at mutually agreed
upon dates and times. See ISA’s e-mail address for scheduling.
3. On rare occasions, the ISA may begin a class. The ISA is an Africana Studies major and is qualified to do this.
4. Perform other classroom duties as designated by the instructor.
**The Instructional Student Assistant is not responsible for making decisions on disputed grades. If you wish to
dispute or question a test grade, or consult about a test, or consult about your progress in this class, you need to see
me during office hours.
CLASS ETIQUETTE and STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES: There are several common sense rules for this
class:
1. No eating during class
2. Turn off phone ringers during class
3. Conversation, or other non-class related activity or habits that disturbs either your classmates learning OR
disturbs the instructor will not be tolerated
ANYONE IN VIOLATION OF ITEMS 1-3, WILL BE DISMISSED FROM CLASS FOR THAT DAY. SECOND
AND SUBSEQUENT VIOLATIONS OF ITEMS 1-3 WILL RESULT IN DISMISSAL FOR THAT DAY, AND A
LOSS OF 20 POINTS. (also see item #5)
4. Please be on time to class. If you must arrive late, enter quietly, and take the first available empty seat. If you
must leave early, leave quietly
5. A student will be dropped from class if he/she continues to exhibit behavior that prohibits or impedes any member
of the class from pursuing class learning objectives.
6. You will be responsible for all the materials presented in class (lecture, films and discussions of reading
assignments), even if you are tardy or absent. Material previously covered in class may not be repeated.
7. Any student accumulating absences that exceed 6% of the total semester hours may be dropped by the instructor
.
EXAM POLICY AND LATE WORK POLICY:
a) No exams may be taken early
b) Only one “make-up” exam per student will be permitted; after that, you will lose 15 pts. per make up,
unless you have a verifiable excuse
ACCESSIBILITY: Students who need accommodation of their disabilities should contact me privately to discuss
specific accommodations for which they have authorization. If you have a disability, but have not contacted Student
Disability Services at 619-594-6473 (Calpulli Center, Suite 31010), please do so before making an appointment to
see me
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SPRING 2016 ASSIGNMENT CALENDAR (Dates and Topics Subject to Modification)
TEST ONE READINGS for TOPIC AREA:
“1865 -1880s- RECONSTRUCTION and POST RECONSTRUCTION ERAS”
1. Jan. 21> Intro. to class
2. Jan, 28> begin reading all of chapters 12 and 13*; and read following from
chapter 14: pages 289 to 295, and pages 307-311*.
3. Feb. 4> Continue above readings; Q &A review
4a. Feb. 11>TEST #1; Lecture may follow test
MIDTERM/TEST TWO READINGS for TOPIC AREA:
“BLACK LIFE IN THE POST RECONSTRUCTION SOUTH, WEST, AND DIASPORA”
4b. Feb. 11> Intro. lectures to remainder of chapter 14 not covered in first test (this means read all of chapter 14
EXCEPT pages 289 to 295, and pages 307-3II of ch. 14); then read chap.15, pages 314 to 331* and chapter 16,
pages 341-to middle of page 345 (end with Booker T. Washington)*.
5. Feb. 18> continue Feb. 11 readings
6. Feb. 25> continue Feb. 12 readings
7. March. 3> continue Feb. 12 readings
8. March 10> continue and complete remainder of Feb. 12 readings; Q &A review
9a. March 17> Midterm/Test Two; Lecture may follow test
TEST THREE READINGS for TOPIC AREA:
“ GREAT MIGRATION TO HARLEM RENAISSANCE”
9b. March 17 > Intro. lectures to chapter 16 (read pages 345 to end of chapter 16); and chapter 17
10. March 24> continue chapter 16 (read pages 345 to end of chapter 16); and chapter 17
11. April 7> complete chapter 16 (read pages 345 to end of chapter 16); and chapter 17; Q and A review
12a. April 14> Test Three; lecture may follow test
TEST FOUR/FINAL EXAM READINGS for TOPIC AREA:
“GREAT DEPRESSION TO PRESENT”
12b. April 14> intro. to chapters 18, 19 (pages 439-440), 20 (pages 446-460), 21, 22 (pages 502-523); chapter 24
13.April 21 >continue chapters 18, 19 (pages 439-440), 20 (pages 446-460), 21, 22 (pages 502-523); chapter 24
14. April 28> continue chapters 18, 19 (pages 439-440), 20 (pages 446-460), 21, 22 (pages 502-523); chapter 24
15. May 5> complete chapters 18, 19 (pages 439-440), 20 (pages 446-460), 21, 22 (pages 502-523); chapter 24;
review as needed for final
16. May 12> FINAL EXAM/TEST #4- 4 to 6 PM
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SAN DIEGO STATE UNIVERSITY SPRING 2016