Krista Botton
SED 610
Two-week Lesson Plan
Subject: Biology
Topic: Pathogens and the Immune System
Teachers: Krista Botton and Marissa Mullen
Lesson 1: Wednesday, March 19
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Class “silent” brainstorm on current knowledge of bacterial life
(types of cells, characteristics, diseases they cause, uses, etc)
 Activities: Notes Section 19-1
 Review: Workbook p. 213-216
 Homework: Workbook p. 213-216, Cornell notes
 Teaching Methods: assessment of prior knowledge, direct instruction with
interactive lecture/discussion of 19-1 concepts
Lesson 2: Thursday, March 20
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Questions/problems with Workbook or from Cornell notes
 Activities: Video – Body Story: Germs (25 min), Read aloud antibiotic resistance
article (as a class)
 Review: Video and article review and enhance knowledge regarding bacteria
 Homework: Ch. 19 Vocabulary
 Teaching Methods: Clarifying questions, formative assessment, review/recall of
concepts, visual representation of material
Krista Botton
SED 610
Lesson 3: Friday, March 21
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Warm up / Review
 Activities: Bacteria Lab (part 1), continue reading article and answer review
questions
 Review: Lab and article review and enhance knowledge regarding bacteria
 Homework: Study for quiz Monday
 Teaching Methods: Clarifying questions, formative assessment, review/recall of
concepts, kinesthetic learning
Lesson 4: Monday, March 24
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Questions on article, questions before quiz?
 Activities: Bacteria Quiz, Bacteria Lab (part 2), finish article questions
 Review: Lab reviews and enhances knowledge regarding bacteria
 Homework: Finish lab report
 Teaching Methods: summative assessment, review/recall of concepts, kinesthetic
learning
Lesson 5: Tuesday, March 25
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Class “silent” brainstorm on current knowledge of viruses (living v.
nonliving, characteristics, diseases they cause, etc)
 Activities: Notes section 19-2
 Review: Workbook p. 217-219
 Homework: finish workbook p. 217-219, Cornell Notes
 Teaching Methods: assessment of prior knowledge, direct instruction with
interactive lecture/discussion of 19-2 concepts
Krista Botton
SED 610
Lesson 6: Wednesday, March 26 and Thursday, March 27 (Blocked Minimum Days)
 Purpose:
o Standard 10d: Students know there are important differences between
bacteria and viruses with respect to their requirements for growth and
replication, the body's primary defenses against bacterial and viral
infections, and effective treatments of these infections
 Introduction: Warm up / Review
 Activities: Video – Body Story: The Flu (25 min), Notes Section 19-3
 Review: Workbook p. 220-222
 Homework: finish workbook p. 220-222, Ch. 19 packet/objectives, study for quiz
 Teaching Methods: formative assessment, review/recall of concepts, visual
representation of material, self-directed study, metacognition
Lesson 7: Friday, March 28
 Purpose:
o Standard 10: Organisms have a variety of mechanisms to combat disease
 Introduction: Questions / clarification before quiz?
 Activities: Ch. 19 Quiz, Disease Transmission Activity, Notes Ch. 40-1
 Review: Workbook p. 475-476
 Homework: finish workbook p. 475-476
 Teaching Methods: summative assessment, kinesthetic learning activity, selfdirected study
Lesson 8: Monday, March 31
 Purpose:
o Standard 10a: Students know the role of the skin in providing nonspecific
defenses against infection
o Standard 10b: Students know the role of antibodies in the body's
response to infection
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o Standard 10f: Students know the roles of phagocytes, B-lymphocytes, and
T-lymphocytes in the immune system
Introduction: Warm up / Review
Activities: Notes Ch. 40-2
Review: Workbook p. 477-479, Ch. 40 Vocabulary, Cornell notes
Homework: finish workbook p. 477-479
Teaching Methods: formative assessment, direct instruction, review/recall of
concepts
Krista Botton
SED 610
Lesson 9: Tuesday, April 1
 Purpose:
o Standard 10a: Students know the role of the skin in providing nonspecific
defenses against infection
o Standard 10b: Students know the role of antibodies in the body's
response to infection




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o Standard 10f: Students know the roles of phagocytes, B-lymphocytes, and
T-lymphocytes in the immune system
Introduction: Warm Up / Review
Activities: Immune System Comic Strip Project
Review: Exam review worksheet
Homework: Finish project if needed, Ch. 40 Vocabulary, work on exam review
Teaching Methods: formative assessment, self-directed study, metacognition,
review/recall of concepts
Lesson 10: Wednesday, April 2
 Purpose:
o Standard 10c: Students know how vaccination protects an individual from
infectious diseases
o Standard 10e: Students know why an individual with a compromised
immune system (for example, a person with AIDS) may be unable to fight
off and survive infections by microorganisms that are usually benign
 Introduction: Share comic strips / peer grade
 Activities: Notes 40-3
 Review: workbook p. 480-482
 Homework: finish workbook p. 480-482, work on exam review
 Teaching Methods: review / recall, direct instruction, metacognition
Krista Botton
SED 610
Team Teaching Assignment
Reflection Day 1
 What went well?
The silent brainstorm showed that students have a good current understanding of
bacteria. They were able to identify bacteria as prokaryotic cells and remembered
that these cells do not have a nucleus. They also identified many uses of bacteria
and remembered that bacteria are frequently used in genetic engineering –
remembering the plasmid/recombinant DNA lab that we did in December.
 What could have been done better?
The day went really well, it might be nice to incorporate cooperative learning into
the lesson since their understanding of material is fairly good to begin with. Create a
jigsaw activity?
 What will you do tomorrow?
We will discuss some of the concepts that were covered today before the video on
bacteria is shown. Video will need some introduction and discussion of mature
behavior as the video is about a man who gets food poisoning.
Reflection Day 2
 What went well?
Students enjoyed the video on Germs. Many shared their own food poisoning
experiences. Many questions were raised about how other foods become
contaminated with pathogens that cause food poisoning which led to a nice
discussion of the E. coli outbreak in spinach that occurred last year and how
scientists had to solve the puzzle of what was causing the infections. Having
students read the antibiotics article aloud was a great idea because we were able to
stop and discuss concepts in the article. I think that students had a much better
understanding of the article and the concepts therein than I have experienced in
years past where students merely skim the article in order to find the answers to the
questions.
 What could have been done better?
This day went really well; I don’t know that there was much I would have done
differently. Ms. Mullen and I actually presented the article differently. She had
students read and answer questions on their own. We had a great conversation
about the interest and discussion of the article concepts that my students shared.
She may have the article read aloud next year.
 What will you do tomorrow?
Tomorrow I will ask warm up question on the section of direct instruction that will
include information that will be on the quiz. I will direct students through the lab
and we will continue reading the article as a class.
Krista Botton
SED 610
Reflection Day 3
 What went well?
The students did really well on the warm up. Most concepts were accurately recalled
indicating that re-teaching of concepts is not really necessary. Not much of a
surprise but, students LOVED the lab! I gave specific direction on how to culture a
sample on a Petri dish using a giant Petri dish diagram on the whiteboard and a
quick visual of their dishes showed that the groups have a nice spread. For once,
NONE of my groups broke the agar. We continued reading the article as a class and
we continued a nice class discussion.
 What could have been done better?
I did not allow students to have pre-arranged lab groups so I assigned groups by
rows to the lab. This did not really lead to the best mixes of students academically
since I tend to seat many of my lower performing students toward the front of the
room and many of these lower performing students were grouped into the same lab
group. I may want to have pre-arranged groups for next year. Ms. Mullen and I also
discussed changing the lab for next year to include a culture area that is selected by
the students so that they can test an area that they are interested in (money, their
cell phone, their calculator, etc). Some students seemed anxious to finish the article
near the end. The last section was a bit more difficult to work though as it covered
conjugation and the graphics that provided a visual were not visible on the copies of
the article. We may want to include some instruction in this next year so that
students better understand how plasmids with antibiotic resistance pass from
microbe to microbe.
 What will you do tomorrow?
I will have my students complete the quiz on bacteria and then we will finish the
bacteria lab by looking at our bacterial cultures to see how many colonies have
grown and compare the different areas we have tested. We will also finish the
questions that accompany the article.
Reflection Day 4
 What went well?
Students took the quiz and on average, did very well. Most of the bacteria cultures
came out well. Students are demonstrating both comprehension and interest in the
article and the topic of bacteria.
 What could have been done better?
One group spread their bacteria on the wrong side of the Petri dish – in the lid,
rather than on the agar. I need to clarify the directions to make sure that all
students understand the lab and get the results that are anticipated. Ms. Mullen and
I also did not have the growth that we had hoped for because of the room
temperature over the weekend. The heat/air in our rooms is turned off over the
weekend to save energy and since it was not warm outside, the rooms were cool
and growth did not occur as we had hoped. We may need to consider incubation of
samples next year.
 What will you do tomorrow?
Krista Botton
SED 610
Tomorrow we are moving on to viruses. We will attempt to assess prior knowledge
and make sure that, in accordance with the standards, we are having students
compare and contrast the growth, replication and defenses the body has against
both bacterial and viral pathogens.
Reflection Day 5
 What went well?
Students don’t seem to know as much about viruses as they do bacteria but
students seemed interested in the material because of the focus on pathology.
 What could have been done better?
This may also be a section that we could have students jigsaw, especially with some
additional support materials. This would have students more actively involved with
instruction and increase the cooperative learning experience.
 What will you do tomorrow?
We will check the workbooks tomorrow and assess the students’ understanding with
a warm up activity on the direct instruction. Students will watch a video about a
battle with Influenza B and answer some questions. Finally, students will look at the
final section of the chapter using a worksheet on their own.
Reflection Day 6
 What went well?
We were on a block schedule today so students were in class for 70 minutes. It is a
much longer period of time than students are accustomed to so time changing
activities is important. The pacing seemed to go very well; most students were
surprised when the bell rang. This would indicate that students were engaged in the
activities and didn’t even notice the extended time period. Having students look at
the last section of material on their own was good.
 What could have been done better?
Today went very well. Ms. Mullen and I could not find great fault with our plans or
their implementation.
 What will you do tomorrow?
Quiz on bacteria and viruses tomorrow, and then we will do an activity on disease
transmission and some notes from the text by the students.
Reflection Day 7
 What went well?
The students again, really liked the activity on disease transmission. This was a new
activity for me and Ms. Mullen provided me with some much needed guidance as
she has used it in the past with other classes. Ms. Mullen warned me ahead of time
how students often automatically assign AIDS as the disease being transmitted. I
was able to circumvent this problem by calling it “pseudo-ebola.” The notes the
students completed seemed to go very well and the ideas of Koch’s postulates tied
in nicely with the activity we completed in class.
 What could have been done better?
Krista Botton
SED 610
Again, this lesson went very well and I wouldn’t change much. The only thing that
was difficult for students was trying to determine who the original source/carrier of
the disease was. It would be good to write out some directions on how to trace back
the source and have students work in groups to try to determine who it was. Groups
could then compare their answers and reasoning to fish out which groups are
correct.
 What will you do tomorrow?
Warm up tomorrow will cover concepts from the notes the students took on section
1. We will then move on to the next section with direct instruction.
Reflection Day 8
 What went well?
Students never really like lecture material, especially when it is difficult material but
today’s lesson went well enough. As I ran though the powerpoint with them, I drew
a comic on the board (like they would be doing tomorrow). I think this really helped
to keep students interested in the material and provided an avenue for better
understanding and more complex questions from the class. This is a difficult section
of material that I don’t think students could master without direct instruction.
 What could have been done better?
I really think that things went well. Not all students drew my pictures in their notes
but since their next assignment is to draw their own comic, I really don’t want too
many students to copy my example from the board; they would just give me back
exactly what I gave them and learning would not occur.
 What will you do tomorrow?
Students will create their own comic strip of the specific immune response using
their notes and the text.
Reflection Day 9
 What went well?
This is an assignment that we have used before. It was better this year by far than
it has been in the past. Students worked diligently on their comics, many regretting
that my example from the day before was not in their notes! The new textbook’s
diagrams are also awful so most students were really creative in their approach to
the comic because there wasn’t much that they could steal from their books.
 What could have been done better?
This assignment still needs a little work. Ms. Mullen and I should create a rubric that
is distributed before the assignment so that students can see how we will grade it
and be able to meet the requirements. We also discussed how we should clarify the
directions to state whether we would like them to include nonspecific defenses in
their comics.
 What will you do tomorrow?
I will provide students the opportunity to share comics tomorrow then we will
discuss immune system disorders and vaccines. Students usually enjoy this section
of material…they like discussing the consequences of body systems not acting
appropriately.
Krista Botton
SED 610
Reflection Day 10
 What went well?
Students really enjoy this section. It almost takes the entire class period although it
is not that long because it initiates a great deal of discussion and questions from the
students.
 What could have been done better?
Nothing…it went great. It might be fun to have students do further research for
extra credit and create medical brochures for some of the immune system topics in
this section (vaccination, AIDS, autoimmune disorders, etc).
 What will you do tomorrow?
Tomorrow we will review the material from the exam review worksheet (covering
chapter 19 and chapter 40) in order to prepare for the test on Friday. Depending on
the level of preparation by the students we may play a review game.
Krista Botton
SED 610
Team Teaching Reflection
Marissa Mullen and I have been team teach with other for over two years. I truly
believe that two heads are far superior to one when it comes to lesson design. Each
member of the team teaching team considers different aspects that will lead to more
effective teaching and consequently, learning experience. By working as a team we also
increase each other’s repertoire of lessons since each member of the team brings
different ideas and resources to the table. Working together, we can pull together the
best of these ideas and resources to create lessons that will have an indelible mark on
the understanding of our students.
Team teaching is really only effective when the teachers who are team teaching
with one another are open to new ideas and are respectful and considerate of each
other. If teachers do not have this kind of relationship then the process will not be
successful; it takes the right teaming of teachers or the right personality mixes. Marissa
Mullen and I had a friendship that was established before we began team teaching and
I think this may have led the to successful team teaching experience we have shared.
We have a mutual respect for each other and value the ideas that the other shares. I
cannot say that this is the case with all teachers in my department or that I could team
with other teachers as successfully as I have with Marissa.
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