University Of Northern Iowa
School Of Health, Physical Education and Leisure Services
Division of Physical Education
Outcomes Assessment for Teaching Majors
Benchmarks for student outcomes assessments.
The benchmarks for the Physical Education program are based on student outcomes and performance.
This requires us to systematically collect data on student performance that is then analyzed, interpreted,
and discussed in the context of program improvement. As such, the Physical Education – Teaching
program outcomes include:
Outcome I.
Outcome II.
Outcome III.
Outcome IV.
Outcome V.
Be knowledgeable about concepts and principles relating to Human Movement.
Be able to perform a variety of movement skills.
Understand students and the process of learning.
Demonstrate the ability to teach effectively to both groups and individuals.
Understand responsibilities and opportunities in order to continue to develop as teachers
and leaders throughout their careers.
Procedures.
Performance data reported here are based upon the following procedures. Outcomes I, II, and IV were
assessed during student teaching. Evaluation forms were completed as to the student’s competence.
Competencies were measured using rubrics describing abilities demonstrated during their student
teaching experience. They were assessed on a five-point scale from unsatisfactory (1), to competent (3),
to outstanding (5). Outcome II was assessed by measuring levels attained on four tests of physical
fitness- body composition, curl-ups, push-ups, and a one-mile jog. Passing the fitness test was based on
the cut-off point for the highest of the average/moderate fitness category (Dolgener & Hensley, 19??).
Outcome V was assessed based on the number of students participating in professional associations,
conferences, and physical education experiential learning course opportunities. Additional survey results
were obtained from the Renaissance Group Survey administered to UNI student teachers. The UNI
Placement and Career Services Graduate Follow-up Report was used to obtain data on the employment
of recent physical education graduates.
NOTE:
(Outcome I was assessed using the Overall Mean of Question #1 on the Student Teaching Evaluation
form.)
(Outcome II was assessed using the Overall Percentage of Students passing each physical fitness test.
In other words, the results of each test were totaled to provide an overall percentage. Starting in 2000,
these tests were administered as part of 420:053.)
(Outcome III was assessed using the Overall Mean of Questions #2, #3, and #4 on the Student Teaching
Evaluation form.)
(Outcome IV was assessed using the Overall Mean of Questions #5, #6, #7, and #8 on the Student
Teaching Evaluation form.)
(Outcome V was assessed as part of 420:173. The assessment was based on the number of students
participating in professional activities. The competency rubric consisted of Unacceptable, Acceptable,
and Outstanding. Students not completing professional activities for classes and not doing additional
experiences were categorized as Unacceptable. Students completing all required professional activities
and attending local or state conferences/speakers not required for class were rated as Acceptable.
Students completing all acceptable requirements plus attending a National Convention/Conference,
service as PE Club officer, or volunteering time in a physical activity leadership role was classified as
Outstanding.)
C. Findings.
Outcome I. Be knowledgeable about concepts and principles relating to Human Movement.
Year
2002-2003
2003-2004
Findings
rating
Analysis
Modifications
Outcome II. Be able to perform a variety of movement skills.
Year
2002-2003
2003-2004
Findings
% passed
% at risk
% passed
% at risk
Analysis
Modifications
Outcome III. Understand students and the process of learning.
Year
2002-2003
2003-2004
Findings
rating
Analysis
Modifications
Outcome IV. Demonstrate the ability to teach effectively to both groups and individuals.
Year
2002-2003
2003-2004
Findings
rating
Analysis
Modifications
Outcome V. Understand responsibilities and opportunities in order to continue to develop as teachers
and leaders throughout their careers.
Year
2002-2003
Findings
% Outstanding
% Acceptable
% Unacceptable
Analysis
Modifications
2003-2004
D. Results.
A review of the outcomes assessment findings suggests that
E. Planned modifications.
Planned modifications to the undergraduate physical education program include adding two new
courses: Introduction to Physical Education (420:0XX) and Senior Seminar in Physical Education
(420:1XX). The purpose of the introductory course will be to develop an awareness of the types of
programs and their requirements available in the field, introduce student outcome assessment and
portfolios, discuss technology in physical education, and provide an overview of various professional
associations and journals. The Senior Seminar will serve as a capstone course in which students present
portfolios, learn about licensure and evaluations, and discuss program promotion and professionalism
upon entering the field.
Faculty will continue to discuss and evaluate the curriculum to ensure that the student’s needs are being
met. Specifically, both the disciplinary knowledge core and the skill/activity content areas will be
reevaluated. With the proposed change in student outcomes assessment explained in the following
paragraphs, the infusion of technology into the curriculum will receive even greater emphasis.
The present student outcomes procedure is also being modified to meet the NASPE/NCATE Standards
as the Division prepares for NASPE/NCATE accreditation. The Division has identified three critical
stages for student outcome assessment. These are pre-admission, pedagogical content, and student
teaching stages. The following lists the benchmarks for each critical stage and current data available.
This data will be collected for the next five years in preparation for future NASPE/NCATE accreditation
efforts.
During the Pre-admission Stage teacher education candidates demonstrate competence for NASPE
Standards: Standard 1: Content Knowledge, Standard 2: Growth and Development, Standard 8:
Reflection, and Standard 9: Technology and Standard 10: Collaboration. Teacher candidates address
these Standards by completing the following tasks.
Benchmark
% program
completers
unacceptable level
Pre-admission Stage
% program
completers
acceptable level
% program
completers target
level
Basic Skill analysis
project
Skill competence &
proficiency
Observational
Analysis of Children
Motor Behavior
Task
Field Experience
Reflections on
Diversity
Use of Technology
Engage in
Professional
Opportunities
During the Pedagogical Content Stage teacher education candidates demonstrate competence for
NASPE Standards: 1: Content Knowledge, Standard 2: Growth and Development, Standard 3: Diversity,
Standard 4: Management and Motivation, Standard 5: Communication, Standard 6: Instruction, Standard
7: Student Assessment, Standard 8: Reflection, Standard 9: Technology, and Standard 10:
Collaboration. These standards are addresses by teacher education candidates by completing the
following tasks.
Benchmark
Pedagogical Content Stage
% program
% program
% program
completers
completers
completers target
unacceptable level
acceptable level
level
Mechanical Analysis
Philosophical
Statement
Planning for
Developmental
Stage
Teaching based on
Learning Styles
Planning based on
Individual
Differences
Management Plan
Teaching of Special
Needs Students
(Adapted Physical
Ed.)
Teaching at Price
Laboratory School
(Methods)
Power Point
Presentation
Assessment Plan
Reflections on
Teaching & Student
Learning
Collaboration with
Teachers in the
Field
During the Student Teaching Stage teacher education candidates demonstrate competence in all of the
NASPE Standards by completing a Teacher Work Sample Project. This project requires student teachers
to design and teach a comprehensive unit. Before they teach the unit, they describe contextual factors,
identify learning goals based on NASPE and district content standards, create an assessment plan
designed to measure student performance before (pre-assessment), during (formative assessment), and
after (post-assessment), and plan for their instruction. After they teach the unit, they analyze student
learning and reflect upon and evaluate their teaching as related to student learning.
Benchmark
Student Teaching Stage
% program
% program
completers
completers
unacceptable level
acceptable level
% program
completers target
level
Teacher Work
Sample
The University via the department of their major recommends students for teacher licensure. Teacher
education candidates that do not meet the predominance of the preceding outcomes at the acceptable
level will not be recommended for licensure.
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University Of Northern Iowa Division of Physical Education