APPENDIX III-A
Student Outcomes Assessment Plan
MA Program in School Library Studies
Department of Curriculum & Instruction
College of Education
PROGRAM OVERVIEW
The Division of School Library Studies offers a master's degree, and endorsement
programs, all leading to Iowa licensure endorsements for school teacher librarians. All
students must have a teaching license in order to be granted an endorsement as a school
teacher librarian: students can receive a K-8 or 7-12 endorsement, depending on the level
of their licensure. The MA leads to a K-12 endorsement, regardless of the original level of
their licensure.
The Division is part of the Department of Curriculum & Instruction within the College of
Education, but works closely with the Graduate College and Continuing Education. In
cooperation with UNI Continuing Education, the Department of Curriculum & Instruction
School Library Studies Master's Degree Program is distance-friendly, yet retains a sense of
identification with UNI and establishes for our students a network of colleagues throughout
the state. The delivery medium for each course is determined by the faculty member, based
on appropriate pedagogy for the content of the course. Only one course is delivered
entirely on-campus, Organization of Information (SLS 5115). All other courses are
delivered either as hybrid courses or online. Technologies for course delivery include the
Iowa Communications Network (ICN), Blackboard, and AdobeConnect.
I. ASSESSMENT PHILOSOPHY AND PROGRAM GOALS
Student performance assessments are essential for determining the effectiveness of a
program. A commitment to student assessment grounded in clear expectations, with
alignment to national and state standards characterizes the approach to assessment in this
program. At the course level, rubrics and explicit criteria are used in every course to ensure
that students know what is expected and faculty are able to provide specific and targeted
feedback.
The program has identified seven “critical performances” (including the Master’s paper and
the graduate portfolio) aligned with the Iowa Department of Education licensure outcomes
(Note: These are cross-walked with American Association of School Librarians
Competencies for Initial Preparation as well as National Board of Professional Teaching
Practices competencies). These performances document students’ achievements related to
intended outcomes. By identifying and assessing critical performances embedded in
1
coursework, instructors monitor student performance and adjust course expectations and
content to meet deficiencies demonstrated in these assessments. Summative assessments
in this program are the e-portfolio and the master’s paper. These two performances
provide measures of overall understanding of the profession.
The mission of the School Library Studies program is to prepare teacher librarians who
use their acquired knowledge of children & young people, books & information
technologies, and curriculum & the power of collaboration to provide leadership in schools,
through their management of organized and accessible print and electronic materials
collections, their support for reading guidance, and their integration of curricular content
to teach inquiry and technology applications for diverse learners using constructivist
teaching to prepare PK-12 students who read widely, adopt a critical stance as information
consumers, and use technology to access, organize, process, and communicate information.
The School Library Studies Division mission statement shares in the Curriculum &
Instruction departmental philosophy of leadership, providing scholarship, understanding
theory and research, and application as provided in the Curriculum & Instruction
Department mission statement:
Our mission is to prepare professionals who demonstrate capable performance and
insightful leadership for entry level and senior positions, and to provide advanced
study and professional growth opportunities for practicing professionals. Our
department is characterized by its emphasis on reflective practice, technology,
curriculum integration, multiculturalism, and constructivist philosophy.
The School Library Studies Division mission statement also coincides with the College of
Education mission to prepare educational professionals for service and leadership, as well
as the University of Northern Iowa mission statement that points out that the university
focuses on both undergraduate education and offers "selected master's...programs" that are
characterized by excellence in teaching and learning, research, scholarship, and service. It
further states that the University "shares it's expertise with, and provides service to,
individuals, communities and organizations throughout the state..."
II. STUDENT OUTCOMES AND COMPETENCIES
Student outcomes assessments align with the Iowa Department of Education Licensure
Requirements. These also reflect The ALA/AASL Standards for Initial Preparation of School
Librarians and competencies detailed by the National Professional Teaching Practices
Board. Objectives on course syllabi are defined in terms of Iowa Licensure requirements.
Courses from the MA sequence for the School Library Studies program aligned with the
Iowa Department of Education competencies are indicated in parentheses.
2
The School Library Studies program prepares students to:
Literacy and Reading
1.a. collaborate with other teachers to integrate developmentally appropriate literature in
multiple formats to support literacy for youth of all ages. (SLS 4132/5132 and SLS
4134/5134)
1.b demonstrate knowledge of resources and strategies to foster leisure reading and model
personal enjoyment of reading, based on familiarity with selection tools and current trends
in literature for youth of all ages. (SLS 4132/5132 and SLS 4134/5134)
1.c understand how to develop a collection of reading and informational materials in print
and digital formats that support the diverse developmental, cultural, social and linguistic
needs of all learners and their communities. (SLS 6289)
1.d. have skills to model and teach reading comprehension strategies to create meaning
from text for youth of all ages. (SLS 4132/5132 and SLS 4134/5134)
Information and Knowledge
2.a teach multiple strategies to locate, evaluate, and ethically use information in the context
of inquiry-based learning. (SLS 6223)
2.b advocate for flexible and open access to the library. (SLS 4114/5114)
2.c. uphold and promote the legal and ethical codes of the profession including privacy,
confidentiality, freedom and equity of access to information. (350:SLS 6225)
2.d. use skills and knowledge to assess reference sources, services, and tools in order to
mediate between information needs and resources to assist learners in determining what
they need. (SLS 6250)
2.e. model and facilitate authentic learning with current and emerging digital tools for
locating, analyzing, evaluating and ethically using information resources to support
research, learning, creating, and communicating in a digital society. (SLS 6230)
2.f. demonstrate knowledge of creative and innovative uses of technologies to engage
students and facilitate higher-level thinking. (SLS 6230)
2.g. develop an articulated information literacy curriculum grounded in research in the
information search process. (SLS 6223)
2.h understand the process of collecting, interpreting, and using data to create new
knowledge to improve the school library program. (SLS 6295)
2.i. employ the methods of research in library and information science. ( SLS 6299)
Program Administration and Leadership
3.a. evaluate and select print, non-print, and digital resources using professional selection
tools and evaluation criteria to develop and manage a quality collection designed to meet
the diverse curricular, personal, and professional needs of the educational community.
(SLS 4114/5114)
3.b. demonstrate knowledge to organize the library collections according to current,
standard library cataloging and classification principles. (SLS 4115/5115)
3.c. develop policies and procedures to support ethical use of information, intellectual
freedom, selection, reconsideration, and the privacy of users of all ages. (SLS 6225)
3.d. develop strategies for working with regular classroom teachers, support
3
services personnel, paraprofessionals, and other individuals involved in the educational
program. (SLS 6225)
3.e. demonstrate knowledge of best practices related to planning, budgeting (including
alternative funding), organizing, and evaluating human, information resources, and
facilities to ensure equitable access. (SLS 6225)
3.f. understand strategic planning to ensure that the school library program addresses the
needs of their diverse communities. (SLS 6225)
3.g. advocate for school library and information programs, resources, and services among
stakeholders. (SLS 6225)
3.h. promote initiatives and partnerships to further the mission and goals of the school
library program. (SLS 6225)
Practicum
4.a. apply knowledge of learning styles, stages of human growth and development, and
cultural influences of learning at the elementary and secondary levels. (SLS 6290)
4.b. implement the principles of effective teaching and learning that contribute to an active,
inquiry-based approach to learning in a digital environment at the elementary and
secondary levels. (. (SLS 6290)
4. c . understand the teacher librarian role in curriculum development and the school
improvement process at the elementary and secondary level. ((SLS 6223)
4.d. collaborate to integrate information literacy and emerging technologies into content
area curricula. . (SLS 6290)
III. FREQUENCY OF ASSESSMENTS/ASSESSMENT METHODS
Frequency
Systematic assessment occurs at these points:
Initial portfolio assessment at the end of the first course in the program sequence,
SLS 6114 Introduction of School Librarianship. This assessment is completed by the
instructor of record for the course. This assessment is helpful in forecasting any
areas of concern for the cohort as they begin progressing through their program of
study.
Annual review of assessments of critical performances. Faculty in the program
annually review theses assessments and identify patterns in performance that
signal a need to change in courses or other student experiences.
Review of graduate portfolios as each cohort exits the program (Note: The majority
of students within a cohort complete the program on schedule; however, some
students lag behind and their portfolios become part of the set for review in a
subsequent cohort.)
4
Overall curriculum review according to the University Curriculum Review cycle; this
process includes review of program of study, degree requirements, course
descriptions
Whenever the Iowa Board of Education Examiners revises requirements for
licensure, it is imperative that the program review requirements and align with
licensure rules
Methods
Portfolio: All students are required to develop an electronic comprehensive graduate
portfolio that satisfies the competency exam requirement for the master's degree. A
beginning program portfolio that satisfies the candidacy exam requirement is completed
and assessed in the first course that is taken in the program sequence, 350:114g
Introduction to the School Library Program.
Identification of Critical Performances. One ongoing measure of student performance is
assessment of critical performances as students proceed through their cohort’s program of
study. The program office maintains a file of student critical performance assessments;
assessments are performed by the faculty of record for the associated course; patterns
indicating areas of particular strength or consistent shortcomings are shared within the
program faculty annually and used to inform short-range course-level changes as well as
long-range curriculum planning.
Student Learning Outcomes*
2.d. use skills and knowledge to assess reference sources,
services, and tools in order to mediate between
information needs and resources to assist learners in
determining what they need.
2.e. model and facilitate authentic learning with current
and emerging digital tools for locating, analyzing,
evaluating and ethically using information resources to
support research, learning, creating, and communicating in
a digital society.
2.f. demonstrate knowledge of creative and innovative uses
of technologies to engage students and facilitate higherlevel thinking.
1.a. collaborate with other teachers to integrate
developmentally appropriate literature in multiple formats
to support literacy for youth of all ages
1.d. have skills to model and teach reading comprehension
strategies to create meaning from text for youth of all ages.
2.a teach multiple strategies to locate, evaluate, and
ethically use information in the context of inquiry-based
learning.
Critical
Performance
Evidence
Graduate Portfolio
Rubric applied
by faculty
supervisor of
the student’s
research
Practicum
Reflective Paper
(SLS 6290)
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
5
4.a. apply knowledge of learning styles, stages of human
growth and development, and cultural influences of
learning at the elementary and secondary levels.
4.b. implement the principles of effective teaching and
learning that contribute to an active, inquiry-based
approach to learning in a digital environment at the
elementary and secondary levels.
4.d. collaborate to integrate information literacy and
emerging technologies into content area curricula.
1.b demonstrate knowledge of resources and strategies to
foster leisure reading and model personal enjoyment of
reading, based on familiarity with selection tools and
current trends in literature for youth of all ages
1c. understand how to develop a collection of reading and
informational materials in print and digital formats that
support the diverse developmental, cultural, social and
linguistic needs of all learners and their communities.
3.a. evaluate and select print, non-print, and digital
resources using professional selection tools and evaluation
criteria to develop and manage a quality collection
designed to meet the diverse curricular, personal, and
professional needs of the educational community.
3.b. demonstrate knowledge to organize the library
collections according to current, standard library
cataloging and classification principles.
2.c. uphold and promote the legal and ethical codes of the
profession including privacy, confidentiality, freedom and
equity of access to information.
3.c. develop policies and procedures to support ethical use
of information, intellectual freedom, selection,
reconsideration, and the privacy of users of all ages.
3.d. develop strategies for working with regular classoom
teachers, support services personnel, paraprofessionals,
and other individuals involved in the educational program.
3.e. demonstrate knowledge of best practices related to
planning, budgeting (including alternative funding),
organizing, and evaluating human, information resources,
and facilities to ensure equitable access.
3.f. understand strategic planning to ensure that the school
library program addresses the needs of their diverse
communities.
3.g. advocate for school library and information programs,
resources, and services among stakeholders.
3.h. promote initiatives and partnerships to further the
mission and goals of the school library program.
2.g. develop an articulated information literacy curriculum
grounded in research in the information search process.
4. c . understand the teacher librarian role in curriculum
development and the school improvement process at the
elementary and secondary levels.
Collection
Development
Project
(SLS 5114)
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
Policy Manual
(SLS 6225)
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
Curriculum Map
(SLS 6223)
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
6
1.a. collaborate with other teachers to integrate
developmentally appropriate literature in multiple formats
to support literacy for youth of all ages
1.d. have skills to model and teach reading comprehension
strategies to create meaning from text for youth of all ages.
2.h understand the process of collecting, interpreting, and
using data to create new knowledge to improve the school
library program
2.i. employ the methods of research in library and
information science.
2.b advocate for flexible and open access to the library.
Practicum
Reflective Paper
(SLS 6290)
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
Master’s Paper
(350:295/299)
1st/2nd
Readers/
Departmental
Standards
Advocacy speech
(350:225)
* Based on Iowa Board of Educational Examiners Licensure Standards
Rubric by
course faculty
of record
Research Paper: All students complete a research paper at completion of their master's
program reflecting a particular academic and professional interest. The research paper
requirement provides the opportunity for students to identify a topic of focus, develop a
literature review, define a methodology/procedures and critically engage in a research
study or project development and appropriately summarize the findings. The School
Library Studies program allows the student the option to write or not write a thesis.
•
•
Thesis Option: Students who elect to write a thesis should be prepared for an oral
defense of their proposal and of their final thesis before a committee of three faculty
that includes a faculty member who is not from the College of Education. The
student must submit and present a proposal to the committee for approval. The
student can begin the research process for writing the paper when the proposal has
passed the committee.
Non-Thesis Option: Students who decide not to write a thesis fulfill their research
requirement with a master's paper or project. There is no oral defense with this
option, rather students work closely with two faculty readers. The first reader is a
director for the project and works with the student in topic selection, research, and
writing the paper. When the student and faculty member have refined the paper and
are satisfied with its quality, the paper is submitted to the second reader. The
second reader provides a detached perspective to the paper. This faculty member
will make editing recommendations, or, if the paper still requires a great deal of
revision, the second reader may return the paper to the student and first reader for
further work.
IV. EVALUATING AND INTERPRETING RESULTS
Planned assessment activities are used in 1) the introductory course in the program and
the beginning program portfolio, 2) completion of course projects, with emphasis on
“critical performances,” 3) completion of the practicum, 4) completion of the
comprehensive exam/electronic graduate portfolio, and 5) completion of the research
requirement.
7
The introductory program portfolio is assessed at the end of SLS 5114 by the instructor of
record for the course. A rubric is used for this assessment and as one of the critical
performances; the final evaluation is filed with critical performances.
Course projects are assessed by instructors of record for each course. For the critical
performances the evaluation documents for student performance are filed in the program
office for annual review to determine areas for short-term or long-term program
improvement.
Electronic graduate portfolios are assessed by the faculty member who serves as first
reader for each student’s master’s research paper. Documentation for the evaluation of
graduate portfolios are filed in the program office. These are part of the critical
performances file that is reviewed annually.
The research paper that meets the final research requirement is assessed at the proposal
stage by the instructor of record for SLS 6295, using a program-wide rubric. The final paper
is assessed by the first and second readers assigned for the paper. This paper then is
submitted to the department chair for final review and approval.
V. APPLYING FINDINGS FROM ASSESSMENT
Annually at the end of spring semester, the program faculty review available data to review
the program. Data available include assessments of critical performances (including the
graduate portfolios and master’s papers) as well as input received from students via course
evaluations. These data are referenced against national and state standards to ensure
alignment and acceptable standards for student achievement. The outcome of this annual
review may be a) no change; b) within-course changes (e.g., assignments, assessments,
textbooks, readings, delivery medium), or c) program changes (e.g., deletion of courses,
addition of courses, sequencing).
The program uses the annual assessment report process required by the department as
one vehicle for recording assessment progress. The maintenance of the critical
performances file provides a record of student performance.
The UNI two-year curriculum cycle provides an opportunity and impetus for overall
program review; the most recent review for catalog changes will be implemented in Fall
2012 (e.g., reduction in hours required for the MA to 33 hours).
The UNI program review provides an additional impetus for systemic reflection and review
every seven years.
8
Download

Department of Curriculum & Instruction APPENDIX III-A