Student Outcomes Assessment Plan for Early Childhood Education BA program (Spring 2010)
1. Assessment Philosophy:
The ultimate student learning outcome for early childhood education majors is licensure by the state of Iowa
to teach, with the ED100 endorsement entitled, “Teacher—Prekindergarten through Grade 3, including
special education.” The program leading to licensure and endorsement is standards based and uses
performance-based assessment and authentic assessment techniques as much as possible. Each one of the
ECE courses delivered in the Curriculum and Instruction department has significant field experience hours,
providing the opportunity for such performance-based and authentic assessments. Each course covers a set
of the ED100 standards, and the syllabi indicate which standards are covered by which assignments. In the
same way that the Teacher Work Sample is the critical performance at Level IV, Student Teaching, there is a
critical performance at Level III, a beginning physics learning center integrating math, science and literacy,
that each candidate designs, implements, and modifies over six of the ten weeks of participation in an early
childhood classroom. These data, from individual courses, from Level III critical performance, and from
Level IV Teacher Work Sample, are used by the faculty for program assessment.
While any one episode of assessment of the program may be occasioned externally by an administrative
requirement (academic program review, provost’s program review, state Chapter 79 accreditation review,
Higher Learning Commission review), biweekly meetings of the faculty in the Early Childhood Division
include aspects of program assessment in every agenda. Curriculum mapping within the division continues
without the wider institutional support with which it began, with faculty for each course reporting at
intervals using student learning outcome data for ED100 standards to identify areas of strength and
weakness and to suggest vertical alignment across courses for standards that require spiraling development
across the program.
Assessment is an important content topic across most of the major courses in ECE, and in the spirit of
practicing what we preach, we believe in using authentic assessments based in the practices of each course
rather than relying primarily on summative assessments separate from content delivery. We are attempting
to find the equivalent approach to program assessment so that it will be embedded in the ongoing work of
the division rather than being triggered by an external demand for program review, even when such
requirements occur on the current annual basis.
2. Student Outcomes and Competencies:
The student outcomes for the Early Childhood Education major are the Iowa Initial Licensure Standards as
aligned to the endorsement ED100 standards. All assignments for major courses are identified by specific
standards met. (See Table 1 for the alignment of these sets of standards.)
The main critical performances in the program are
 evaluations of the early childhood majors in their Level III field experience (210:192)
 evaluations of the double-major elementary education/early childhood education majors in their
elementary Level III field experience placements (on the UNIted system)
 evaluations of the early childhood majors in their Level IV student teaching placements
 assessments of their Teacher Work Samples from their Level IV student teaching
3. Frequency of Assessments:
Early Childhood Education majors participate in the critical performances for the teacher education program
in general for Levels I and II, which they complete before taking their methods courses in the division. Each
of the methods courses includes formative and summative assessment for the specific standards assigned to
each course and each course has identified one or more critical performances that cover more than one
standard. (See Table 2 for an example from the ECE Curriculum course). At this time, the contribution of
these course-based assessments to program assessment is primarily informal, between faculty members who
send to or receive from each other’s sequenced courses at the end of each term, either in a division faculty
meeting or by meeting in dyads. Although informal, this process has resulted in a good deal of data-based
course revision to reduce redundancy and identify holes to fill in the program. Course assessments, including
the Level III critical performances, and student teaching assessments, including the Teacher Work Sample,
are every term.
In the past when sufficient resources of money, personnel, and access have been made available, graduates
of the program have been surveyed.
Occasionally individual faculty members have carried out research projects in which data have been useful
for program assessment, but time constraints and individual priorities make this form of assessment unlikely
to become a part of an ongoing assessment plan.
Data from critical performances at the program level generally are evaluated in the context of an external
demand for program review, but since these have occurred annually in the current four-year period, this has
become an annual review.
4. Assessment Methods:
Critical performances in each course are documented by the students and assessed by the faculty member
using a variety of methods, including rubrics or other scoring criteria for written documentation, and
checklists or rating scales for observations of performance-based assignments.
Critical performances at the program level each have their own assessments:
 early childhood majors in their Level III field experience (210:192) course grade based on a variety
of criteria, including a rating scale for ED100 standards met filled out by the host teacher at the
participation site after 10 weeks of participation
 double-major elementary education/early childhood education majors rated by their elementary
Level III field experience placement cooperating teacher on the UNIted system
 evaluations of the early childhood majors in their Level IV student teaching placements
 Level IV student teaching Teacher Work Samples scored by ECE faculty and discussed at a division
meeting each term and scores from all ECE majors on the UNIted system
5. Methods of Evaluating and Interpreting Results:
Critical performances for each course are evaluated at the end of each course by individual faculty members,
or by teams if a course is taught by more than one faculty member, and used for data-based instructional
decision-making to make changes in a course to better support student mastery of the standards assigned to
that course.
Data from critical performances at the program level generally are evaluated in the context of an external
demand for program review, with particular attention to the purposes of each review. Biweekly division
meetings include program review items on each agenda until data have been collected and shared and
discussed and reviews have been submitted. ED100 standards that are shown to be insufficiently covered
will be targeted for closer attention, including covering them across courses, or changing assignments to
meet them more effectively.
Table 1 Alignment of Standards for Standards-based Assessment in ECE program
Iowa Unified ECE/ECSE Endorsement (ED100)
“Teacher—Prekindergarten through Grade Three,
Including Special Education”
http://www.state.ia.us/boee/addition.html
Iowa Renaissance Licensure/Interstate New Teacher Assessment
& Support Consortium (INTASC) Standards
http://www.uni.edu/teached/__downloads/INTASCstandards.pdf
(2008, January)
(1) Child growth and development.
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1.Understand the nature of child growth and
development for infants and toddlers (birth through
age 2), preprimary (age 3 through age 5) and
primary school children (age 6 through age 8), both
typical and atypical, in areas of cognition, language
development, physical motor, social-emotional,
aesthetics, and adaptive behavior.
1. STUDENT LEARNING: The practitioner understands how
students learn and develop and provides learning opportunities
that support intellectual, career, social and personal
development.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
1. STUDENT LEARNING: The practitioner understands how
students learn and develop and provides learning opportunities
that support intellectual, career, social and personal
development.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
3. INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING: The practitioner plans
instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students,
the community, curriculum goals and state curriculum models.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
2.Understand individual differences in
development and learning including risk factors,
developmental variations and developmental
patterns of specific disabilities and special abilities.
3.Recognize that children are best understood in
the contexts of family, culture and society and that
cultural and linguistic diversity influences
development and learning.
(2) Developmentally appropriate
learning environment and curriculum
implementation.
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1.Establish learning environments with social
support, from the teacher and from other students,
for all children to meet their optimal potential, with
a climate characterized by mutual respect,
encouraging and valuing the efforts of all regardless
of proficiency.
1. STUDENT LEARNING: The practitioner understands how
students learn and develop and provides learning opportunities
that support intellectual, career, social and personal
development.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
5. LEARNING ENVIRONMENT/ CLASSROOM
MANAGEMENT: The practitioner uses an understanding of
individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
learning environment that encourages positive social interaction,
active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
2.Appropriately use informal and formal
assessment to monitor development of children and
to plan and evaluate curriculum and teaching
practices to meet individual needs of children and
families.
3.Plan, implement, and continuously evaluate
developmentally and individually appropriate
curriculum goals, content, and teaching practices
for infants, toddlers, preprimary and primary
children based on the needs and interests of
individual children, their families and community.
4.Use both child-initiated and teacher-directed
instructional methods, including strategies such as
small and large group projects, unstructured and
structured play, systematic instruction, group
discussion and cooperative decision making.
5.Develop and implement integrated learning
experiences for home-, center- and school-based
environments for infants, toddlers, preprimary and
primary children:
·Develop and implement integrated learning
experiences that facilitate cognition,
communication, social and physical development of
infants and toddlers within the context of parentchild and caregiver-child relationships.
·Develop and implement learning experiences
for preprimary and primary children with focus on
multicultural and nonsexist content that includes
development of responsibility, aesthetic and artistic
development, physical development and well-being,
cognitive development, and emotional and social
development.
·Develop and implement learning experiences
for infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary
children with a focus on language, mathematics,
science, social studies, visual and expressive arts,
social skills, higher-thinking skills, and
developmentally appropriate methodology.
·Develop adaptations and accommodations for
infants, toddlers, preprimary, and primary aged
children to meet their individual needs.
6.Adapt materials, equipment, the environment,
programs and use of human resources to meet
social, cognitive, physical motor, communication,
and medical needs of children and diverse learning
needs.
(3) Health, safety and nutrition.
1.Design and implement physically and
7. ASSESSMENT: The practitioner understands and uses
formal and informal assessment strategies to evaluate the
continuous intellectual, social and physical development of the
learner.
3. INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING: The practitioner plans
instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students,
the community, curriculum goals and state curriculum models.
4. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: The practitioner
understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to
encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem
solving, and performance skills.
1. STUDENT LEARNING: The practitioner understands how
students learn and develop and provides learning opportunities
that support intellectual, career, social and personal
development.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
3. INSTRUCTIONAL PLANNING: The practitioner plans
instruction based upon knowledge of subject matter, students,
the community, curriculum goals and state curriculum models.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
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5. LEARNING ENVIRONMENT/CLASSROOM
psychologically safe and healthy indoor and
outdoor environments to promote development and
learning.
2.Promote nutritional practices that support
cognitive, social, cultural and physical development
of young children.
3.Implement appropriate appraisal and
management of health concerns of young children
including procedures for children with special
health care needs.
4.Recognize signs of emotional distress, physical
and mental abuse and neglect in young children and
understand mandatory reporting procedures.
5.Demonstrate proficiency in infant-child
cardiopulmonary resuscitation, emergency
procedures and first aid.
MANAGEMENT: The practitioner uses an understanding of
individual and group motivation and behavior to create a
learning environment that encourages positive social interaction,
active engagement in learning, and self-motivation.
2. DIVERSE LEARNERS: The practitioner understands how
students differ in their approaches to learning and creates
instructional opportunities that are equitable and are adaptable to
diverse learners.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
4. INSTRUCTIONAL STRATEGIES: The practitioner
understands and uses a variety of instructional strategies to
encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem
solving, and performance skills.
(4) Family and community
collaboration.
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1.Apply theories and knowledge of dynamic
roles and relationships within and between families,
schools, and communities.
4.Use communication, problem-solving and helpgiving skills in collaboration with families and
other professionals to support the development,
learning and well-being of young children.
5.Participate as an effective member of a team
with other professionals and families to develop and
implement learning plans and environments for
young children.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
(5) Professionalism.
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1.Understand legislation and public policy that
affect all young children, with and without
disabilities, and their families.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
2.Assist families in identifying resources,
priorities, and concerns in relation to the child's
development.
3.Link families, based on identified needs,
priorities and concerns, with a variety of resources.
2.Understand legal aspects, historical,
philosophical, and social foundations of early
childhood education and special education.
3.Understand principles of administration,
organization and operation of programs for children
aged birth to 8 and their families, including staff
and program development, supervision and
evaluation of staff, and continuing improvement of
programs and services.
4.Identify current trends and issues of the
profession to inform and improve practices and
advocate for quality programs for young children
and their families.
5.Adhere to professional and ethical codes.
6.Engage in reflective inquiry and demonstration
of professional self-knowledge.
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
9. COLLABORATION, ETHICS AND RELATIONSHIPS:
The practitioner fosters relationships with parents, school
colleagues, and organizations in the larger community to support
students' learning and development.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
(6) Prestudent teaching field
experiences. Complete 100 clock hours of
prestudent teaching field experience with three age
levels in infant and toddler, preprimary and primary
programs and in different settings, such as rural and
urban, encompassing differing socio-economic
status, ability levels, cultural and linguistic diversity
and program types and sponsorship.
(7) Student teaching.
Complete a supervised student teaching experience
of at least 12 weeks total in at least two different
settings in two of three age levels: infant and
toddler, preprimary, primary and with children with
and without disabilities.
8. FOUNDATIONS, REFLECTION AND PROFESSIONAL
DEVELOPMENT: The practitioner continually evaluates the
effects of the practitioner's choices and actions on students,
parents, and other professionals in the learning community, and
actively seeks out opportunities to grow professionally.
10. COMPUTER APPLICATION: The practitioner
understands and uses a variety of computer applications to
encourage students' development of critical thinking, problem
solving, and performance skills.
Table 2 Critical Performance in ECE Curriculum course
The Curriculum Project is the culminating activity for the 210:151 Early Childhood Curriculum
Development and Organization course. This project addresses many of the ED100 teaching
standards.
Examples of how the project demonstrates progress toward the standards can be found in
one of the curriculum projects submitted in the fall 2009 semester. This project is typical of the
projects submitted every semester.
ED100 STANDARD
EXAMPLES OF STUDENT WORK
ADDRESSING THE STANDARD
1.2 Understands individual differences in
Pages 1-6
development and learning including risk
factors, multiple intelligences,
Each student creates an imaginary child
developmental variations, and
with a specific disability. The student
developmental patterns of specific
researches the disability and then describes
disabilities and special abilities.
this imaginary child, including strengths,
limitations, likes and dislikes. The student
must also describe any accommodations or
modifications that will be made in the
classroom so the imaginary child can fully
participate in the curriculum
2.2 Uses informal and formal assessment
Pages 14-34 (assessment sections for each
to effectively monitor children's
lesson plan)
development, and plans and evaluates
curriculum and teaching practices to meet
Pages 36-123 (for each activity in each
the individual needs of children and their
learning center the student describes
families.
appropriate assessment)
2.3 Plans, implements, and continuously
evaluates developmentally and individually
appropriate curriculum goals, content, and
teaching practices for children 0-8 based on
the strengths, needs, and interests of
individual children, their families, and the
community.
2.4 Uses both child-initiated and teacherdirected instructional methods including
strategies such as small and large group
projects, unstructured and structured play,
systematic instruction, group discussion,
and cooperative decision making.
2.6 Adapts materials, equipment, the
environment, programs, and human
resources to meet the social, cognitive,
physical-motor, communicative, and
All lessons, learning centers, activities and
assessments must take into consideration
the needs of the imaginary children created
by the students.
Pages 14-123
Students plan teacher-directed large group
lessons that are structured around literacy.
In addition the students plan five learning
centers. The centers allow for a
combination of guided activities and childinitiated activities.
Pages 36-123
For each learning center, the student
completes an adaptations checklist to
indicate what support the imaginary child
medical needs of children with diverse
learning needs.
4.5 Participates as an effective member of
a team with other professionals,
paraprofessionals, volunteers, and families
to develop and implement learning plans
and environments for young children
with disabilities would need in order to
fully participate in that center
The curriculum project is designed so that
the students must work as a group to design
the curriculum for their virtual class. The
virtual class consists of one imaginary
child with a disability and one imaginary
typically developing preoperational child
for each student in the group. The group
designs and equips an imaginary
classroom, creates a context for their
classroom, selects a topic that is
appropriate for the classroom, and plans
large group lessons and learning centers to
fit the topic.
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Student Outcomes Assessment Plan for Early Childhood Education BA program... 1. Assessment Philosophy: