SIFT Annual
Report 2010/11
UCL Medical School
2
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
3
University College London (UCL) Medical School is committed to
excellence in education and has a strong reputation for teaching informed
by cutting-edge research. The School has a distinguished cadre of
academic staff who are at the forefront of international research in medical
sciences and clinical medicine.
UCL Medical School is one of the largest in the country with a total yearly
intake of c.380 (c.330 in Phase 1 & an additional 55 in Phase 2)
undergraduate students on the MBBS programme and it has the widest
range of intercalated BSc opportunities in the UK. The Medical School
also offers postgraduate programmes and clinical training.
UCL Medical School is situated in the heart of London at three main
campuses; the Bloomsbury campus, the Royal Free campus, and the
Whittington campus; all with clinical facilities, teaching laboratories, lecture
theatres, and libraries. We also work with a number of District General
Hospitals (DGH), numerous mental health partners and over 200 GP
practices.
This infrastructure along with a dedicated team of
internationally acknowledged world leaders and highly trained technical
staff provides the ideal intellectual learning environment for medical
students.
Staff research activities, directed towards patient-centred outcomes, are
supported by partnerships with NHS trusts. Several world famous clinical
and research institutions are closely associated with the Medical School.
UCL Partners, one of the first academic health science centres, was set
up during 2009/10. There are 5 Founding Partners: UCL; Moorfields Eye
Hospital NHS Foundation Trust; University College London Hospitals NHS
Foundation Trust; Royal Free Hampstead NHS Trust; and Great Ormond
Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust; it now has 4 Executive Partners,
one “Future Partner” and 10 members. It works to advance medical
research, quality patient care and medical education.
Status of this report
This report has been prepared for the sole use by NHS London, and no
responsibility is taken by the Medical School to any director / member or
officer in their individual capacity, or to any third party.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
4
Contents
Summary
5
Introduction
5
Detailed Report
6
A. Student number time series information to highlight future bulge and fallow
intakes
6
Student population as at 1 December 2010
6
Forecast for Autumn 2011 intake
7
Number of qualifiers in summer 2010
7
B. Summary of SIFT expenditure against budget
C. Reporting of quality assurance exercises
8
11
QA of Clinical Placement Providers
11
QA of the MBBS Programme
20
D. Summary of developments, innovations, best practice to include significant
future changes to the curriculum or any other important achievements
22
Developments and innovations
22
Appendix 1 – SOP for QA SIFT visits
24
Appendix 2 – Management Plan arising from the last QABME visit
(2004/05)
27
Appendix 3 – Internal Quality Review 2009-10 Action Plan
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
5
Summary
Introduction
The Medical School is required to complete and return an annual report to
NHS London (the Strategic Health Authority) on the following MBBS
(Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Surgery degree) items:
 student numbers: totals for the preceding year, 2010/11; forecasts for the
following year, 2011/12; and qualifier totals;
 summary of service increment for teaching (SIFT) expenditure against
budgets;
 quality assurance exercises; and
 developments, innovations, and best practice.
This is the fourth SIFT annual report that has been prepared by the Medical
School SIFT Office and the Quality Assurance Unit (QAU). It provides a
summary of relevant Medical School data, with some discussion of
strengths and weaknesses, and has an emphasis on areas we consider to
be examples of good practice. The QAU, working closely with the SIFT
Office, has been developing the processes for the review and enhancement
of the quality of our teaching activity over the past few years.
The period this report covers (April 2010 – March 2011) has again been
characterised by on-going uncertainties regarding the service landscape
and the future funding of medical education in London. The UCL MBBS
Curriculum Review moved into its initial piloting and implementation phase
with the introduction of the New Final Year. The action points that arose
from last year’s Internal Quality Review (IQR) have been addressed and
are either complete or ongoing. For the second year, the General Medical
Council (GMC) required an Enhanced Annual Return to comply with their
QABME procedure following the publication of the new Tomorrow’s Doctors
in September 2009. The uncertainties and increased scrutiny have had a
significant impact on the activities of the MBBS executive, the SIFT Office
and the QAU.
Regarding the future and the increase in regulation, it is important that the
Medical School is closely involved in the new regulatory arrangements that
come with commissioning as well as with the additional requirements of the
GMC.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
6
Detailed Report
A. Student number time series information to
highlight future bulge and fallow intakes
Student population as at 1 December 2010
Table 1
Student Population by year group and by Home / EU and
Overseas as at 1 December 2010
Year Group
Home/EU
Overseas
Total Population
Year 1
309
36
345
Year 2
254
10
264
New Year 3 (IBSc)
284
20
304
New Year 4
342
26
368
New Year 5
342
21
363
New Year 6
359
21
380
Until recently students have been able to intercalate after years 2, 3 and 4
which has led to unpredictable variations in numbers. The new policy is for
all students to intercalate after year 2 (with the IBSc year being renamed
New Year 3).
Year 2 is an unusually small cohort; this will impact on NHS providers when
the students join New Year 4 in September 2012.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
7
Forecast for Autumn 2011 intake
Table 2
Year Group
Forecast for Autumn 2011 intake by year group and by
Home / EU and Overseas
Home/EU
Overseas
Total Population
Year 1
309
32
341
Year 2
309
36
345
New Year 4
339
24
363
New Year 5
342
26
368
New Year 6
356
22
378
New Year 3 (IBSc)
The total forecast is higher this year due to the small cohort moving into NY3.
Number of qualifiers in summer 2010
Table 3
Number of qualifiers in Summer 2010
Number qualified, repeating or failed
Qualified
339
Repeating
24
Failed
0
Did not complete / withdrew
0
Total
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
363
8
B. Summary of SIFT expenditure against budget
Table 4
Summary of SIFT expenditure 1 April 2010 to 31 March 2011
Budget Elements
FTE
BUDGET
ACTUAL
VARIANCE
IN LONDON SIFT SLA Trusts
Barking, Havering and Redbridge
7.29
£86,992
£86,992
£0
Barnet and Chase Farm Hospitals
34.13
£616,623
£616,623
£0
Barnet, Enfield and Haringey Mental Health
12.66
£151,072
£151,072
£0
Camden and Islington Mental Health and Social
Care
40.16
£2,862,346
£2,862,346
Camden Primary Care Trust
37.10
£3,447,525
£3,447,525
£0
Great Ormond Street Hospital
5.03
£60,023
£60,023
£0
Islington Primary Care Trust
4.33
£469,194
£469,194
£0
Moorfields Eye Hospital NHS Foundation Trust
8.37
£99,926
£99,926
£0
29.58
£534,456
£534,456
£0
2.62
£31,264
£31,264
£0
202.27
£21,064,544
£21,064,544
£0
0.58
£6,921
£6,921
£0
University College London Foundation Hospitals
192.86
£22,173,985
£22,173,985
£0
Whittington Hospital
135.98
£8,649,037
£8,649,037
£0
712.96
£60,253,908
£60,253,908
£0
North Middlesex University Hospitals
Royal Brompton and Harefield
Royal Free Hampstead
Royal National Orthopaedic
Sub Total
£0
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
9
Budget Elements
FTE
BUDGET
ACTUAL
VARIANCE
OUT OF LONDON SIFT SLA Trusts
Basildon and Thurrock University Hospitals
45.21
£817,280
£817,280
£0
East and North Hertfordshire
30.44
£550,253
£550,253
£0
2.23
£26,611
£26,611
33.77
£611,013
£611,013
£0
3.28
£39,140
£39,140
£0
18.93
£237,568
£237,568
£0
133.86
£2,281,865
£2,281,865
£0
147.39
£431,845
£431,845
£0
£1,758,855
£1,758,855
£0
£882,449
£882,449
£0
147.39
£3,073,149
£3,073,149
£0
31.10
£371,148
£270,696
£100,382
3.64
£43,436
£30,964
£12,472
34.74
£414,584
£301,660
£112,924
North Essex Partnership NHS Foundation Trust
Luton and Dunstable Hospital
North Essex Mental Health Trust
West Hertfordshire Hospitals
Sub Total
GP
GP Education and Infrastructure (inc Small and Tasked
GP)
GP Clinical Placement
GP Facilities
Sub Total
OTHER
Non Contract Trust Budget (includes Non SLA Trusts)
Clinical Phase 1 SSCs
Sub Total
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
10
CLINICAL TOTAL
Clinical Total
Budget Elements
1028.94
FTE
£66,023,506
BUDGET
£65,910,582
ACTUAL
£112,924
VARIANCE
ADMIN BUDGET
Teaching the Teachers
£117,837
£117,837
£0
Occupational Health
£157,210
£177,175
(£19,965)
£12,204
£12,204
£0
Clinical Skills Tutors
£140,018
£140,018
£0
SIFT Co-ordination Budget
£158,478
£158,478
£0
Simulated Patients for teaching and assessment
£26,778
£26,778
£0
Patient Database Administrator
£15,173
£15,173
£0
£627,698
£647,663
(£19,965)
£66,651,204
£66,558,245
£92,959
CRB Checks
Admin Total
Total
1028.94
The Non-Contract Trust budget and the Clinical Phase 1 student selected components (SSCs) budget both show underspends;
previous experience has shown that many providers invoice late for services, often well beyond the end of the budget year.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
11
C. Reporting of quality assurance exercises
QA of Clinical Placement Providers
i) Executive summary of the Medical School’s QA of Clinical Placement Providers
in 2010/11
Quality Assurance Unit
The purpose of the Quality Assurance Unit (QAU) is to ensure that high standards
within teaching and learning processes for undergraduate medical programmes are
recognised and rewarded, and problems are identified and addressed. The Unit has
oversight of all quality assurance and enhancement of the MBBS programme, including
clinical placements, as well coordinating responses to programme review. It was
established in 2006 in response to recommendations made by the GMC; recognising
that the area of quality assurance was not adequately resourced within the Medical
School. The QAU employs a range of strategies to create a picture of the students’
educational experience across the whole curriculum. The QAU works in conjunction
with the SIFT Office to ensure financial accountability.
During 2010/11, the MBBS submitted a second, Enhanced Annual Return to the GMC
to comply with their QABME1. Because these reviews necessitate input from
academics and administrators across the Medical School and from our NHS partners,
the normal programme of visits was somewhat curtailed to free up QAU staff time. As
last year, this proved to be a necessary strategy, however the School is mindful of the
situation and is reviewing its practice to cope with a significant rise in regulatory
demand as well as continue its regular quality monitoring processes of peripheral sites.
Student Feedback
The QAU gathers feedback from students throughout the programme using a tailored,
on-line student evaluation questionnaire for each module. Data can be analysed by
module and NHS site and in many cases, by individual clinical firm or GP practice. The
QAU also works directly with student representatives to improve responsiveness to
issues they raise.
Trust QA visits – summary
The School’s standard practice for quality assurance SIFT site visits is currently
undergoing an extensive review with the aim of increasing efficiency as well as meeting
the needs of the increasing volume of mandatory QA reporting processes (e.g. the
GMC’s QABME processes). while we look at the appropriate proportionality of QA
processes. These new processes will be survey-led, and provide an assessment of the
quality of teaching provision. Underperformance will be addressed via a light-touch
visit, focused on providing support where necessary and reducing local barriers to
improvement.
This is partly driven by the as well as the unit aiming to increase efficiency.
1
Quality Assurance of Basic Medical Education
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
12
Following on from the “focused visits” pilot (2008/09), where areas in need of attention
were raised and discussed at the central trusts’ Undergraduate Teaching Committees,
the Unit is now planning to adapt this model for DGHs.
The aims of the visits are to:
 ensure the quality of educational provision meets the requirements laid
out in the Learning and Development Agreement, Tomorrow’s Doctors
2009, QABME report and any other guidelines issued by the School, the
GMC, the SHA, College and the QAA;
 review action plans from previous visits; and
 promote good relations with the Trust through dialogue, feedback, and
support.
 share good practice
After each visit, the QAU produces a QA SIFT site visit report which is sent to the
Trust. The report includes a summary that recognises good practice and outlines
Necessary and Desirable recommendations in an Action Plan. The report is signed off
by the visit’s academic lead and the SIFT Co-ordinator.
Reports are published on the Medical School QAU website:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/quality/site-visits/#reports
The QAU is looking to review and realign the self-assessment questionnaire it sends
out to the trusts. This process will ensure the communication of GMC and Medical
School standards to our teaching partners, as well as facilitate the transfer of
information to the GMC’s enhanced annual return format. In this way, sites outside the
visit cycle will also participate in the remote evaluation; all returns will be collated and
considered alongside the student feedback and any prior action plans.
QA SIFT monitoring 2010/11
The revisiting schedule for 2010/11 is below.
Table 5
Overview of status of site visits and reviews of hospital trust (at
May 2011)
SITE
VISIT STATUS
(date last visited)
TYPE OF
VISIT
COMMENT
Barnet
October 2010
Full
Joint visit with Chase Farm
Basildon
February 2011
Focused
NC Roadshow / NC6 visit
Chase Farm
October 2010
Full
Joint visit with Barnet
King George
December 2011
Full
For Yr4 only (Yr5 N/A) / NC Roadshow
Lister / QEII
May 2011
Focused
Joint visit with QEII
NC Roadshow / NC6 visit
Luton & Dunstable
May 2011
Focused
NC Roadshow / NC6 visit
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
13
SITE
VISIT STATUS
(date last visited)
TYPE OF
VISIT
COMMENT
North Middlesex
May 2011
Focused
NC Roadshow / NC6 visit
Royal Free
Planned for July 2011
Extended
focused
UCLH
October 2009
Extended
tbc
Watford (W Herts)
December 2010
Full
Whittington
July 2009
tbc
tbc
Full = look at O&G, Paediatrics, Medicine, Surgery (Y5) and A&E
Focused = look at a selection of the attachments
NC = New curriculum
NC6 = New curriculum final year
Roadshow = Disseminate details of New Curriculum
Extended = continuation of the Trust’s Undergraduate Teaching Committee led by the QA SIFT team
.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
14
ii) Description of process used
Activities are usually run in accordance with rigorously developed Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs). A detailed SOP for QA
SIFT visits is included in Appendix 1.
iii) Strengths/ Areas in need of improvement for each Trust visited
The table below is a summary of information is derived from the reports of the sites visited since the last SIFT Annual Report was
submitted.
Table 6
Strengths / Areas in need of improvement for each Trust
Trust / date of previous visit
Strengths
Areas in need of improvement
Barnet Hospital
Paediatrics and O&G teaching good.
Final year surgery at Barnet could benefit
from closer collaboration with sister site at
Chase Farm.
Overall positive introduction of the newly restructured
final year despite a rather rocky early start, which was
due to administrative problems; these were picked up
and remedied.
Basildon
23/01/2008
Provided excellent support for all students, in particular
the retaking cohort.
Resources – the standard of
accommodation is poor.
Final year – feedback is excellent, students received a
large amount of regular and varied teaching.
Chase Farm
Surgery teaching on this site is exceptional – and is the
only site to get consistently good / very good evaluation
for surgery.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
Paediatrics
Reported uncertainty about the future of
this site affected many students’
confidence and this might have been
15
better managed.
King George
Not used for final year.
None
Paediatrics teaching continues to be outstanding.
O&G (provided at Queens Hospital) – no concerns.
Lister
A fair introduction to the new final year.
(19/01/2007)
Generally the feedback is good and the staff appear
enthusiastic.
O&G teaching is good.
Paediatrics has improved, but because of
the fragmentation of the service it needs
constant attention.
The site will be working on tightening
arrangements for supervision in the
assistantships.
Plans to improve IT access by September
2011 to be monitored.
Luton & Dunstable
(26/01/2009)
Outstanding contribution to new final year, both in
terms of clinical placements and additional support,
most notably in patient safety, prescribing and clinical
skills.
None
Paediatrics – feedback is excellent, the attachment is
very well organised.
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – feedback is very good,
consultants are welcoming and happy to teach.
Final year – feedback is excellent, due to excellent
organisation and a large amount of bedside teaching.
Resources – accommodation is excellent.
North Middlesex
(03/12/2008)
Generally good. Significant improvement from last year,
most notably running the revision session and OSCEs
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
Some difficulties in administration and
failure to identify cover during staff
16
(which were reported as excellent by students).
absences (particularly in A&E).
Paediatrics – feedback is excellent, due to the large
amount of teaching received.
Resources – there is little access to
clinical skills facilities.
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – feedback is excellent, it is
well organised with consultants providing excellent
teaching and encouraging students to get involved.
Inadequate IT provision for students in
the hospital will be addressed by the end
of 2011. Need to ensure that ALL
accommodation has WiFi or cable. We will
monitor.
QEII
Rapid response to negative feedback.
(19/03/2009)
Resources – accommodation is excellent.
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – feedback is
poor, probably caused by poor timetabling
of teaching.
Some increasingly concerning feedback
towards end of the academic year
revealed that the site was fundamentally
unable to deliver at the quality required.
Undergraduate staff immediately decided
to transfer all undergraduates to the Lister
site for academic year 2011-12, and we
will follow up carefully.
Watford (West Herts)
(02/12/2009)
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – feedback is very good, the
specialty lead commits a great deal of time to
organising and giving teaching.
Final year – feedback is excellent, as is the supporting
administration. Outstanding contribution to new FY,
both in terms of clinical placements and additional
support, most notably in clinical s/v and clinical skills.
This quality is delivered despite significantly lower SIFT
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
None
17
reimbursement however the site is seriously
considering abandoning teaching which would be a
huge loss to the UCL undergraduate teaching
resources.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
18
iv) Strengths / Areas in need of improvement for each Trust not visited
The following information is derived from the information provided by the sites in combination with online student feedback for sites
not visited since the last SIFT Annual Report was submitted.
Trust / date of
last visit
Strengths
Areas in need of improvement
Colchester
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – feedback is excellent, partly due to the
opportunities for students to be involved.
No issues
Royal Free
03/07/2009
General Medicine/Medicine in the Community – very good feedback for
a very well organised attachment.
General Medical Specialties– excellent feedback due to it being wellorganised with very good seminar teaching.
Paediatrics – good feedback
Yr3 Surgery – there seems little desire to teach from consultants,
(junior doctors receive positive feedback) leading to many teaching
cancellations and a poor quality of sessions. Removing students
from this site for this specialty is being considered. Some
improvement needed in Orthopaedics teaching.
Yr4 O&G – timetables not always reliable
UCLH
20/10/2009
COOP/ O&R – feedback is very good, in particular for rheumatology
due to the excellent timetabled teaching sessions, and COOP due to
the excellent bedside teaching.
General Medicine/Medicine in the Community – excellent feedback, the
attachment is well organised with lots of teaching.
Paediatrics – good bedside teaching contributes to the very positive
student feedback.
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – Feedback is very good in particular the
midwife teaching.
Yr3 Surgery – much improved on this site since last year, but more
work needs to be done. Similarly for the Gen Med Spec attachment,
for which some improvement is needed.
Yr4 - no issues
Whittington
23/07/2009
COOP/ O&R – feedback is excellent for all three parts of the module in
particular the organised teaching sessions.
Surgery – feedback is good as the attachment is well organised with
good teaching and variation.
Paediatrics – high volume of teaching and good feedback.
Obstetrics & Gynaecology – excellent feedback for a well-organised
attachment with high quality, enthusiastic teaching.
Yr3 - No issues
Yr4 – no issues
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
19
v) Common issues / Good practice
As part of the review and reporting activities the QAU generates an annual summary of good practice to be disseminated to all
Trusts and made available on the website
Site
Subject
Good practice
Royal Free
Palliative Care
Pastoral care - Ensuring availability to see students in a more formal capacity and informally via email or impromptu
face to face meetings.
Pastoral care - Promoting independent, self-directed learning and fostering an atmosphere where students feel
comfortable to question and critically appraise material.
Whittington
Paediatrics
Assessment – A registrar contributes to exam setting and OSCE station writing and as well as being a regular OSCE
examiner, is involved in facilitating the training of OSCE examiners.
Course management – Provision of information, support, objectives and guidance to all outside speakers who deliver
sessions.
Pastoral care – Introduction of a more formal programme of support than the University’s programme of “buddying” of
first year students with more senior students, by providing a Registrar for each student.
Teaching tool - To increase awareness of the impact of health and illness on the whole family real “patient journeys”
are used as teaching tools. Interviews with families about their experiences of having a child with a long term condition
are written up and each student is “given” a real patient journey in instalments and is prompted by questions to reflect
on what is happening to that family over time. This is facilitated by group discussions about the issues raised from
these “journeys” and a reflective essay on some of the issues raised, before students collect their own “patient
journeys” from families who have volunteered for use in the next academic year.
General Practice
Communication - Set up a 4th year tutor Moodle site to facilitate communication between a geographically disparate population of new and
experienced tutors. This has enabled sharing of practice, teaching resources and expertise about teaching organisation.
Pastoral care - On joining the James Wigg Practice for Gen Med MiC, students are introduced to staff, given a tour of the practice,
introduce themselves to the group and discuss the course and timetable, learning objectives, ideas, concerns and expectations, and career
aspirations in an open and non-judgemental small group environment.
Teaching tool – Creating a bank of patients who are happy to volunteer to be involved in student teaching at the practice.
Training – Provision of support, mentoring, teaching sessions to observe and example lesson plans to newer members of the teaching team.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
20
QA of the MBBS Programme
i) GMC Review - Enhanced Annual Return (EAR) 2010-11
All medical schools in the UK were again required to submit an Enhanced Annual
Return in January 2011. The aim of the EAR 2010/11 was to enable schools to revise
the self-assessment of the status of its compliance, update cohort data (such as
student demographics, fitness to practise and progression data) and to provide
information on progress made in the last year.
The extensive spreadsheets are available on:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/quality/monitoring/monitoringx/QABME_feedback_2010
In addition, the school was again required to provide an update on the Change
Management Plan arising from the last QABME visit (2004/05) included in Appendix 2.
ii) UCL Internal Quality Review
Following completion of the IQR, UCL Academic Services produced a report with
recommendations. The School was required to provide an action plan, and the
Director of Medical Education has been invited to meet the panel (approximately 1 year
after the process) to give them an update.
The Medical School’s external scrutineer commended the following as examples of
good practice:
 The speed of response by the School to the need for change. This
includes the creation of the Division of Medical Education and
transformation of ACME;
 Use of Excellence in Medical Education Awards to motivate further the
high quality teaching staff;

Top teachers awards
 The creation of the site-based posts of Sub Deans and Education
Fellows;
 Innovative OSPE (Objective Structured Practical Exam) and OSCE
(Objective Structured Clinical Exam) stations; and
 Effective fitness to practice procedures.
Other examples of good practice include:
 A Medical Education conference is planned for late June 2011. This will
offer an opportunity for sharing best practice and developing our clinical
teachers as educators.
 Introduction of a texting / Email service for students to report incidence of
cancellations where no alternative teaching has been provided; initially it
is a simple monitoring exercise.
 A website for students to raise any serious concerns that they may have
is being developed (see fig 1). This system is bespoke for medical
students as they are often reluctant to use the Whistleblowing Policy.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
21
Fig. 1
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
22
D. Summary of developments, innovations, best
practice to include significant future changes to the
curriculum or any other important achievements
Developments and innovations
Notes on New Curriculum and new Final Year
UCL is in the process of introducing a new MBBS Programme and in a rather unconventional
move began with a new final year in September 2011. The focus was to improve the
transition to the Foundation stage by focusing on preparation for practice under the banner
“Think like a doctor, act like a doctor”. The key innovation included 16 weeks based at a
single site (with peel off to GP practices), assistantships, student-held procedures records
and tight processes for academic and clinical supervision, including work-based
assessments and multisource feedback. The feedback from both students and staff at clinical
sites has been extremely positive. Staff have been energised by the changes and students
have matured as they become actively involved in clinical care and feel part of the
community of practice. UCL is very proud of the close working relationship with Trusts, GP
practice and the Foundation School that have facilitated this development.
Major priorities over the next year are to expand the assistantships, harness the energy of
junior doctors better, enhance students’ ability to make clinical judgements in acute and
complex situations and step up improvements in prescribing.
Information Technology and NHS teaching
The biggest challenge to delivering the new UCL Curriculum is the variability of IT access for
students. A multi-stakeholder group is working on drawing up expected standards for IT at
NHS sites including students, Library services, and UCL information services as counterparts
at key NHS sites.
i) Curriculum Review of the MBBS
A major review of the structure of the MBBS commenced in 2007 and the changes from
this are still in the process of being implemented.
ii) Curriculum Content Review - Update
UCL Medical School is devising and implementing a New Curriculum which builds on the
strengths of the current MBBS programme and new opportunities within the School of Life
and Medical Sciences and UCLP. With an emphasis on scientific rigour, clinical reasoning
and professionalism, achieved through greater integration and better application of
educational methods, the new curriculum will prepare The UCL Doctor for the
contemporary healthcare environment.
There will be a phased introduction of the new structure; in 2011/12, we are piloting a
number of new changes including:

a new “Foundation Module” introduced to the Year 1 timetable

a cardio-metabolic disease patient pathway, including extended patient contacts,
piloted for Year 2 students

the use of a computer-based portfolio tool by students in Year 3.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
23
The full rollout, however, will begin in September 2012.
Further information is available via the MBBS New Curriculum website:
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/medicalschool/staff-students/mbbs-new-curriculum
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
24
Appendix 1 – SOP for QA SIFT visits
Table 7
N.B. This procedure is under review for 2011-12
Timing
Activity
End of
academic
year
Request
pre-visit
documentat
ion

Email U/G Tutor /Administrator (DGH) or
Campus Sub-Dean (HOME) the pre-visit
documents along with their web-links via the
QAU Website, reminding the Trust of the
deadline for returning documents (normally
the start of the academic year). Send an
Action Plan from the previous year and
request an update. SEND REMINDER A
WEEK/2 IN ADVANCE OF THE DEADLINE!
QA Assistant
At start of
academic
year
Decide
which sites
to visit

Decision based on: when last seen; any
problems we know about via administrators/
MMGs; student feedback; returned
documentation. Also decide what to focus on
if not a mandatory three year visit. Once visits
are decided, assign Visit leads.
Sub Dean
Quality / QA
Officer / QA
Assistant
Arrange
suitable
date for visit

Get available dates from Visit lead and then
coordinate with Undergraduate Tutor and
Undergraduate Administrator (for DGHs) or
Campus Sub-Dean (HOME sites) about dates
for the visit that preferably coincide with the
last couple of weeks of a student rotation.
QA Assistant
Send
confirmatio
n email

Email DGH Undergraduate Tutor and
administrators, managers etc, Visit lead, SIFT
Coordinator, QA Officer
QA Assistant
Invite rest
of the Visit
team

Invite a DGH representative, preferably with
knowledge of one of the weaker attachments/
areas. Invite a student representative,
preferably who has knowledge of attachments
that are being reviewed (the clinical president
may be able to help with this)
QA Assistant
Create
agenda

Liaise with UG administrator over agenda,
ensuring there is suitable time for meetings,
breaks etc. (see template)
QA Assistant
Start
creating the
pack

Start making the pack using the blank
template. Request relevant timetables.
Finance information can be found in the
shared drive under Finance. For focused
visits, include relevant information and a
summary of attachments not being reviewed,
e.g. Chase Farm 12/05/09
QA Assistant
Compiling

The pack should include:
QA Assistant
After
finalisation
of visit
date
8 weeks
prior to
Action
Responsibil
ity
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
25
the visit
the pack
Agenda (see template);
Previous year’s action plan;
General pre-visit self assessment questionnaire;
Library pre-visit self assessment questionnaire;
Summary of firm lead questionnaires;
Student feedback on each specialty and cumulated data
on facilities and administration, including summary,
comparison charts and free text;
Table from the first page of the most recent SLA
(containing a summary of SIFT payments for the year, and
available from Finance on the shared drive or SIFT);
Statement of SIFT Accountability (available from Finance
on the shared drive or SIFT);
Any further information provided by the Trust and of
interest to the visiting team, including timetables;
Directions to the DGH/ HOME attachment; and
Contact details for all members of the team in case of
problems with travel.
4 weeks
prior to
the visit
Sending the
pack

Request the best place to send the pack to
members of the visiting team.
QA Assistant
3 weeks
prior to
the visit
Sending the
pack

Bind each pack of double sided sheets with
plastic covers and a front cover with
CONFIDENTIAL in plain sight and contact
numbers on the inside cover. A pack is to be
sent to all the team members as well as to the
Site.
QA Assistant
Day
before the
visit
To take on
the day

Prepare name tags for Team members(name
and role), copies of:
QA Assistant
Whistle blowing policy (x1);
Rights of patients (x1);
Guidelines for consultants (x1);
Guidelines for students (x1);
Guideline questions to ask Students (1 per attachment x
2);
General possible prompt questions (1 per team member);
and
Travel expenses forms for visit team member to sign
(facilitating quick processing).
Day of the
visit
After the
visit
During the
day
Write the
report

At start of the day, distribute name tags,
general prompt questions (to all) and student
questions (1 per attachment to Visit lead/
student rep and for QA officer/assistant)

Make notes on the discussions, ensuring to
record the attendees from the Trust. Also
ensure that the day runs reasonably to time.

Using the template for reports, use the
feedback from the students, consultants on
the day and previous student feedback along
with the questionnaires to create a report, e.g.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
QA Officer/
QA Assistant
QA Officer/
QA Assistant
26
QEII
After
completing
the draft
report

Send to Visit team for corrections/ additions
QA Officer/
QA Assistant
After
finalising
the draft

Email to UG Tutor and UG administrator,
giving them 3 weeks to respond with factual
corrections
QA Officer/
QA Assistant

Either after 3 weeks or the return and update
from the UG tutor and/or administrator send in
hard copy to the Trust Chief Executive, with
an updated letter from the Visit lead, and cc
copies to specific trust members who were
present at the visit (e.g. medical director) and
to UG tutor, finance representative and
administrators

Ask for an update of action points from the
report
6 weeks
after
sending the
final report
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
QA Assistant
27
Appendix 2 – Management Plan arising from the last QABME visit
(2004/05)
EAR 2010/112 - Section A
Response to previous QABME requirements and recommendations
For all schools except those reviewed in 2009/10 for submission by 14 January 2011
Please note that responses to this section may be published on the GMC’s website.
The School’s previous report can be found at
http://www.gmcuk.org/education/undergraduate/undergraduate_qa/medical_school_reports.asp. Please answer the following
questions to provide an update.
1. For all requirements, please provide an update indicating how they have been addressed.
Tomorrow’s
Requirement
Action taken – If none, explain why
Contact
Supporting
documents list
Timeline
Curricula
content,
structure and
delivery
Changes towards
Response too large for table, document available on request.
Professor Jane
Dacre (Director of
Medical
Education); Dr
Deborah Gill
(deputy)
Organogram
Ongoing
Curricula
content,
structure and
delivery
Review teaching
styles in Phase 1
to facilitate
student transition
between Phases
Response too large for table, document available on request.
Professor
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/medicalschool/
staffstudents/mbb
s-review/
Ongoing
doctors 2003
area
2
integration of the
management
as updated in January 2011
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
Mike Gilbey
28
Curricula
content,
structure and
delivery
Further
development of
Quality
Assurance
Activities
including Quality
Enhancement
Staffing changes:
Dr Ann Griffin
http://www.ucl.ac.
uk/medicalschool/
quality/
Jean McEwan
Minutes of
UCLH/UCL Joint
Undergraduate
Teaching
Committee 06-10
- Admin staff now 2.4FTE and academic staff 0.2FTE. New Sub
Dean Quality started Sept 2010.
Many processes are well established and internal reviews and
audit (UCL IQR/SIFT site and annual monitoring are either in
hand or have been completed.
Developments include:
- Upgrade of Opinio© database for quicker reports which allow
greater intra-SEQ analysis
- Redesign of all Phase 1 SEQs
- Inclusion of core questions for all teaching to allow
comparability of data and analysis of placement quality.
- New certificate of merit for medical student teaching.
- "No show" texting system for short notice teaching
cancellations.
Work in progress:
- Review of whistleblowing policy and practices
- Preparation for practice graduate survey
- Patient engagement in QA
Adequacy of
teaching space
following the
completion of the
move to UCH
Following the progress reported last year, the situation appears
adequate, with no complaints about the facilities from the
teachers or students. However, we are monitoring closely as
there may be a change in pressures with the introduction of a
new curriculum in 2012.
QA/SIFT UCLH
site visit reports
05-10
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
Ongoing
29
2. For any recommendations, state those that have been fully completed or not been fully implemented providing an explanation and
indicating how they have been addressed.
Tomorrow’s
Requirement
Action taken – If none, explain why
Contact
Supporting
documents
list
Timeline
The School needs to ensure
sufficient teaching space and
staff is available as the
course develops
Response too large for table, document available on request.
Dr Jean
McEwan
Minutes of
School Estates
Strategy
Ongoing
Some clinical staff are
involved in teaching of
Phase I, but at present, no
basic scientists are involved
with teaching in the later
stages of the course. This is
an issue the School wishes
to work towards and the
visiting team would
commend this approach
Response too large for table, document available on request.
Professor
Mike Gilbey
The School should consider
providing the results of the
Student Satisfaction Surveys
back to students.
Feedback to the students about the results of the NSS is
now provided in two ways. One as a summary and link to
the whole NSS results on the QA website and a slightly
longer document for the student (RUMS) bulletin.
Ms Ann
Glasser
doctors 2003
area
Committee
MMG Minutes
and
http://www.ucl.
ac.uk/medicals
chool/staffstud
ents/mbbsreview
Ongoing
Completed
3. Please identify any planned changes or improvements as part of the School’s continuous improvement and quality management
regarding any aspect of the School’s undergraduate degree/s that are not part of the School’s response to Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009.
We have been undertaking an on-going curriculum review process into which we are incorporating Tomorrow’s Doctors 2009 and therefore have
included reference to this in the relevant sections of Annex 1 (even where we have indicated that we are already compliant)
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
30
Appendix 3 – Internal Quality Review 2009-10 Action Plan
Active action points
RECOMMENDATIONS
RECOMMENDATION IN FULL
Action taken or planned in response to the recommendation, or reasons why no action is
being taken.
Ensure that the vision for the
programme is disseminated more
widely and engaged with by staff
at all levels.
Ensure that the vision for the programme, clearly articulated by the
Vice-Provost (Health) and by the Dean of the Faculty of
Biomedical Sciences, is disseminated more widely and engaged
with by staff at all levels. This vision is of a vibrant and evolving
programme, which seeks to educate doctors not only for the
requirements of twenty-first century medicine, but also as future
scientists and leaders in the profession, whilst fully acknowledging
and incorporating the key aspects of UCL’s globalisation agenda.
(i) We are on the cusp of implementing the first pilots and changes associated with the new
curriculum. We have a communication plan built into the project implementation plan. Both the VP
weekly newsletter and the DOME termly newsletter are being used to communicate about the
curriculum and from March 2010, developments in the new curriculum. A stakeholders' group has
been set up as one of the new curriculum working parties and the project manager will be setting
up a communication strategy for providing information in a range of formats regarding the new
curriculum.
(ii) We are introducing a new curriculum in 2012. We are using this opportunity to ensure
communication and ‘buy in’ of the vision of the curriculum extends to all staff and students. We
have devised and are rolling out a comprehensive programme of communication and staff
development:
• We have appointed a new curriculum project manager who has taken a lead in devising a
comprehensive communications strategy
• We are undertaking ‘road show’ presentations in all three main trusts and are aiming to reach all
the DGHs by the end of this academic year
• We have presented to students and student representative groups to encourage enthusiasm and
support
• We have begun a series of workshops with GPs tutors and other visiting tutors such as
Professional Development tutors
• We have introduced a standing item on all module management groups and key committees
concerning a new curriculum update and the core new curriculum group ensure there is
attendance at all meetings by one of the team
• We have extensively advertised a new curriculum website which is prominently linked to the
main Medical School website
• We have used a core conditions consultation exercise to further encourage dialogue
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
31
Continue to press for
improvements in the consistency
of the teaching provided by the
NHS Trusts.
Continue to press for improvements in the consistency of the
teaching provided by the NHS Trusts. Whilst the students the team
met and the evidence from the supporting documentation indicated
that teaching was of a good standard overall, many students and
staff raised concerns regarding a small minority of NHS Trust staff
that they considered did not fulfil their teaching obligations or meet
the expected standards. The team acknowledges the difficulties
arising from the fact that many teaching staff are employed by the
NHS Trusts rather than UCL. However, given UCL’s responsibility
for ensuring the quality of the educational experience of its
students, the team advises the Programme to continue to raise
these concerns and press for solutions with the NHS Trusts, in
order to satisfy itself that students’ expectations of teaching are
fulfilled, and to have in place mechanisms to mitigate situations
where a poor experience is reported.
An active programme of site visits is planned for 2010-2011 which will provide all sites with
detailed feedback on their teaching performance. Evaluation practices are being developed which
will include a consistent body of core questions so that all sites will have data that will allow them
to compare their teaching quality with other providers. During this academic year we devised a
“league table”, which was used to identify highly performing clinical sites as well as a few sites
which needed to make improvements. In addition, two new processes are being introduced which
will allow instant reporting of cancelled teaching (SMS texting) and a system which allows
students to directly feedback to the QAU about unsatisfactory educational experiences. In order to
enhance the feedback to teachers, across the NHS trusts, the QAU will survey these sites to
investigate how to develop systems more responsive to their needs. The Medical School is in the
process of devising a more comprehensive set of standards for clinical teaching, this is against the
background of the GMC introducing its own benchmarks in this area and it is hoped that these
new standards will clearly articulate what the Medical School's expectation of placement teaching
will involve.
Extend the proactive approach
taken for its widening participation
strategy and consider ways to
enhance this provision
Extend the proactive approach taken for its widening participation
strategy and consider ways to enhance this provision in order to
broaden student diversity and the numbers from non-traditional
backgrounds (see the Academic Manual Document F9
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/academic-manual/part-f/f9). The Programme
might wish to investigate ways that the BMAT might be further
utilised as a diagnostic tool to identify students with potential, in a
similar way to the use of the National Admissions Test for Law
(LNAT) by the Faculty of Laws.
Revisit the personal tutoring system to assure itself that it: (i)
provides appropriate support for the whole of the student
experience, including academic and pastoral advice; (ii) that it is
an effective first point of call for students’ personal problems and
welfare matters, thus reducing the burden on the Programme’s
welfare provision (and in particular on the Faculty Tutors) and (iii) it
is in line with the aims, principles and suggested practice of the
UCL Personal Tutoring Strategy, which has recently been
approved by Academic Committee.
A preliminary meeting with the Faculty of Laws to discuss good practice has already happened.
Meetings with partnership schools are currently being set up to discuss ways to extend the proactive
approach to the widening participation strategy.
Revisit the personal tutoring
system to assure itself that it
(i) provides appropriate support
for the whole of the student
experience
(ii) is an effective first point of call
for students’ personal problems
and welfare matters
(iii) is in line with the aims,
principles and suggested practice
of the UCL Personal Tutoring
Strategy
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
i) We have brought together the method by which students gain access to the entire welfare team to
further improve the continuity of care for all MBBS students, across the MBBS programme, however we
strive to improve academic support outside of pastoral welfare support - ongoing.
ii) To further support and advise Personal Tutors in order to be more effective in their role - ongoing.
iii) We have implemented most of the aims, principles and suggested practice of the UCL Personal
Tutoring Strategy in the guidance we give to Personal Tutors and students, in respect of their role as
Personal Tutors, frequency of meeting students and expectation of what these meetings will address ongoing.
iv) The School has taken the opportunity of a wide-ranging curriculum review to address outstanding
issues in our personal tutoring system. We have made considerable progress to date and will be fully
compliant across all year groups by Sept 2012 when the new curriculum is introduced. We aim to
introduce some changes in Sept 2011 which will address issues i) and ii) and we are in discussion with
our NHS partners to ensure that a smaller number of clinical tutors get the recognition in their job plans
for an increased work load due to increased frequency of meetings with students.
32
Completed action points
Revisit the role of the
Departmental Equal Opportunities
Liaison Officer (DEOLO)
Revisit the role of the Departmental Equal Opportunities Liaison
Officer (DEOLO) to satisfy itself that it is covering student as well
as staff matters. The students the team met appeared to be
unaware of the role of the DEOLO and the assistance and advice
available on equal opportunities matters. It may be helpful to
include a description of the DEOLO’s purpose, key activities and
contact details in the student information and on the MBBS website (see the Academic Manual Document A10
http://www.ucl.ac.uk/academic-manual/part-a/a10).
A DEOLO for students has been appointed to provide advice to students. A description of the DEOLO's
purpose is available on the UCL website: http://www.ucl.ac.uk/hr/equalities/depts/role.php
Revisit the student information to
ensure the use of the GMC criteria
can be beneficial for the students
Revisit the student information to ensure that it makes it clear that
the use of the GMC “Fitness to practice” criteria is not necessarily
punitive, and that it can be beneficial for students both in
monitoring problems and in identifying the need for support.
An additional sentence has been added to the Fitness Practice section of the A-Z policies for students to
convey that GMC criteria can be beneficial for students.
UCL Medical School SIFT Annual Report July 2011
Download

SIFT Annual Report 2010/11 UCL Medical School Medical School