Natural Environment Report
Yonge Subway Extension Conceptual Design
and Functional Planning Study
Prepared for:
York Region Rapid Transit Corporation
January 2009
Prepared by:
Environmental Consultants
72 Victoria St. S., Ste. 100, Kitchener, Ont. N2G 4Y9
Phone: 519-741-8850 Fax: 519-741-8884
Email: [email protected]
Yonge Subway Extension
Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
Table of Contents
1.0
1.1
2.0
Introduction............................................................................................................ 2
Study Approach.............................................................................................................. 3
Existing Conditions................................................................................................ 4
2.1
Overview and Policy Designations ................................................................................ 4
2.2
Fish and Aquatic Habitat................................................................................................ 5
2.2.1 Overview ................................................................................................................... 5
2.2.2 Fisheries..................................................................................................................... 5
2.2.3 Aquatic Species at Risk ............................................................................................. 6
2.2.4 Ecoplans Surveys....................................................................................................... 8
2.3
Terrestrial Habitat ........................................................................................................ 12
2.3.1 Vegetation Communities ......................................................................................... 12
2.3.2 Flora Species at Risk ............................................................................................... 12
2.3.3 Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat .................................................................................. 16
2.3.4 Fauna Species at Risk .............................................................................................. 17
2.3.5 Wetlands .................................................................................................................. 22
3.0
Environmental Impacts and Proposed Mitigation Measures .......................... 22
3.1
Proposed Works ........................................................................................................... 22
3.2
Fisheries and Aquatic Habitat ...................................................................................... 23
3.2.1 Potential Impacts ..................................................................................................... 23
3.2.2 Mitigation Measures ................................................................................................ 25
3.3
Vegetation, Wildlife and Terrestrial Habitat................................................................ 27
3.3.1 Potential Impacts ..................................................................................................... 27
3.3.2 Mitigation Measures ................................................................................................ 29
3.4
Future Commitments.................................................................................................... 31
List of Tables
Table 1. Aquatic Habitat Assessment Summary ............................................................................ 9
Table 2. Summary of ELC Vegetation Communities................................................................... 13
Table 3. Wildlife Habitat Assessment Summary.......................................................................... 19
List of Appendices
APPENDIX A: TRCA Fisheries Database For Watercourses within the Study Area and Vicinity
APPENDIX B: Working Vascular Plant Checklist
APPENDIX C: Representative Photos from the Yonge Street Subway Extension Study Area
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Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
1.0 Introduction
On June 21 2007, York Region Council authorized commencement of a Conceptual Planning and
Functional Design Study for the extension of the subway in coordination with the City of
Toronto. The scope of Conceptual Design and Functional Planning was to examine and evaluate
possible vertical and horizontal alignment alternatives, station locations, and associated surface
facilities along the corridor in consultation with public and government stakeholders. The goal
was to develop a technically feasible solution and the results serve as the basis that defines the
Transit Project.
Subsequently, the Regional Municipality of York, in partnership with York Region Rapid Transit
Corporation, initiated a Transit Project Assessment for a proposed extension of the Yonge Street
Subway. The Transit Project is following Ontario Regulation 231/08, Transit Projects and Greater
Toronto Transportation Authority Undertakings (2008). The environmental impact of this Transit
Project will be assessed in accordance with the Transit Project Assessment Process as prescribed
in Ontario Regulation 231/08.
The Transit Project is 6.5 km underground extension of the Yonge Street Subway. The extension
will include 6 subway stations from its terminus at Finch Station in the City of Toronto to a
proposed terminus at the Richmond Hill Centre in the Town of Richmond Hill. Stations are
proposed at:
• Cummer Avenue/Drewry Avenue;
• Steeles Avenue;
• Clark Avenue;
• Royal Orchard Boulevard;
• Longbridge Road/Langstaff Road; and
• Richmond Hill Centre.
Intermodal bus terminals are proposed for Steeles Station and Richmond Hill Centre Station. A
park-and-ride lot is proposed at Longbridge Road/Langstaff Road.
Ecoplans Limited (Ecoplans) was retained to undertake a review of the natural environment
within the Study Area, assess impacts related to the Transit Project and develop appropriate
mitigation measures. The assessment focused on impacts to the natural environment from above
ground works including the proposed East Don River Bridge, the removal of the existing East
Don River culvert and potential impacts from the tunnelling entrance (ingress) and exist (egress)
locations. The Preliminary Geotechnical Report produced by Golder & Associates concluded
that, based on the level of investigation completed thus far, it is anticipated that the effects on any
groundwater flow on nearby watercourses (East Don River and Pomona Creek),as a result of the
project if any, will be maintained to environmentally acceptable levels through appropriate
combinations of dewatering, groundwater inflow mitigation measures, and contingency plans
developed through the course of additional investigations, detailed design, and continued
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consultation with the TRCA and MOE regulatory agencies.
The Study Area for this project extends approximately 500 m on either side of Yonge Street
between Finch Avenue and Carville Avenue/16th Avenue, as shown on Figure 1. Key aspects of
the work include an inventory of aquatic species and habitat, natural and semi-natural vegetation
habitat, and wildlife / wildlife habitat.
1.1
Study Approach
Much of the information used to document existing environmental conditions and features has
been extracted from the Natural Sciences Report: Yonge Street Transitway from Steeles Avenue
to 19th Avenue / Gamble Road Individual Environmental Assessment (LGL Natural Sciences
Report) completed by LGL Limited (2005). The report was completed for the York Consortium
and the Regional Municipality of York as part of the Individual Environmental Assessment for
the Yonge Street Corridor Transitway.
In addition to reviewing pertinent secondary source information from the Toronto and Region
Conservation Authority (TRCA), Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) and Environment
Canada (EC), LGL biologists undertook the following field assessments to characterize natural
environmental features within the Study Area:
•
•
•
Aquatic Habitat – March 6 and May 21, 2003
Natural / Semi-natural Vegetation – March 3, May 16, August 13 and October 31,
2003
Wildlife / Wildlife Habitat – March 6 and May 20, 2003
Ecoplans completed Aquatic Habitat and Vegetation Inventory Surveys on October 9, 2008 to
update and confirm the natural environment information outlined in the LGL Limited report.
Field Investigations completed by Ecoplans were focused on the natural area features previously
surveyed by LGL. These are areas are generally within 100 m of Yonge Street. Secondary
source information was also updated by Ecoplans through a review of various on-line databases
and information requests to the TRCA in September 2008 as a component of this project. In
addition, Aquatic Species at Risk (SAR) distribution mapping was obtained from the
Conservation Ontario website for the Study Area (http://www.conservationontario.ca/).
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2.0 Existing Conditions
2.1
Overview and Policy Designations
Background information regarding the Terrestrial Habitat section has been extracted from the
LGL Natural Sciences Report. Ecoplans confirmed and updated this background information
based on field investigations and secondary source information review completed in 2008.
Given the urban nature of the Study Area, natural areas are limited within the Yonge Street
Subway Extension project limits. The most predominant areas are in the vicinity of the East Don
River and along Pomona Mills Creek (Tributary #3 as named in the LGL 2005 study) north of
Highway 407.
There are no Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSIs) within the Study Area. The closest
ANSI is Baker’s Woods Provincial Life Science ANSI which is approximately 2 km northwest of
the Study Area. Baker’s Woods ANSI is a mature, managed sugar maple forest at the northwest
corner of Langstaff Road and Bathurst Street. See Figure 1 for an existing conditions map of the
Study Area.
Very few woodlots or forest areas exist within the Study Area. One very small, fragmented
woodlot is located in the southeast corner of Yonge Street and High Tech Road. A second
wooded area is a forested tract on the east side of Yonge Street south of Royal Orchard Boulevard
along the main branch of the East Don River. A third wooded area is located west of Yonge
Street along Pomona Mills Creek of the East Don River.
The lands surrounding the East Don River and some of its tributaries have been identified and
designated as part of the Regional Greenlands Natural Heritage System in the York Region
Official Plan. Within the Study Area, only the East Don River is part of the Greenlands System.
These natural heritage features are connected to other regional natural heritage features and
provide linkages that facilitate wildlife movement. The main branch of the East Don River
provides a relatively uninterrupted valley and stream corridor stretching from the Oak Ridges
Moraine to Lake Ontario through a heavily urbanized area.
Under Schedule ‘A’ Land Use of the Town of Markham Official Plan, the lands surrounding the
East Don River are identified as ‘Hazard lands’. These lands are part of an Environmental
Protection Area (Valleylands) as well as an Activity Linkage corridor. The City of Vaughan
Official Plan identifies these same lands as ‘Valley Lands’ and a Hydrogeologically Sensitive
Area.
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2.2
January 2009
Fish and Aquatic Habitat
2.2.1 Overview
There are four watercourse crossings (3 watercourses) that cross Yonge Street as well as a small
secondary tributary/drainage feature located within the Study Area limits. These watercourses
form part of the East Don River watershed. A description of each system is outlined below:
• The Main Branch of the East Don River. This watercourse crosses Yonge Street south of
Royal Orchard Boulevard, within the vicinity of the Ladies Golf Club and the Thornhill
Golf and Country Club.
• Pomona Mills Creek (Tributary 3) - tributary of East Don River. This watercourse
crosses Yonge Street just north of Highway 7. It flows through a culvert underneath
Highway 7, through the N-W Highway 7/407 interchange loop and underneath the
existing Highway 407 and Langstaff Road through another culvert. This watercourse
also crosses further north near High Tech Road but is enclosed in a pipe here (Reference
3, 12).
• Tributary #2- tributary of the East Don River. This watercourse flows underground
(enclosed in a pipe) within the vicinity of Yonge Street. This tributary crosses Yonge
Street south of John Street and eventually outlets to the Main Branch of the East Don
River, at Steeles Avenue. There appears to be some open channel reaches further
upstream and downstream of Yonge Street as indicated on Figure 1.
A secondary tributary/drainage feature of Pomona Mills Creek also lies within the Study Area.
This watercourse is located at Reference Site 5 (shown on Figure 1), within the vicinity of the
large Stormwater Management Pond and hydro corridor located north of Highway 7 and east of
Yonge Street. This water feature is a poorly defined drainage feature, which lies adjacent to the
steep road embankment of Highway 7. Connectivity to Pomona Mills Creek was identified as
poor by LGL Limited during their 2003 field work.
A summary of aquatic habitat information for the watercourses found within the Study Area, is
provided in Table 1. Figure 1 outlines the Study Area as well as watercourse location and
classification.
2.2.2 Fisheries
In 2004, available fish community and thermal regime information for the watercourses within
the Study Area was provided to LGL by TRCA. The information provided by TRCA was
deemed sufficient as outlined in the LGL Natural Sciences Report (2005) investigation, and
therefore additional fisheries sampling was not conducted.
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Fisheries data obtained by Ecoplans from TRCA in 2008 are compiled in Appendix A. Fish
station data includes information from stations as far as 6 km from Yonge Street. This table
provides an update to Table 3 of the LGL Natural Sciences Report, which documents pre-2004
TRCA fisheries data. Again, given the recent and abundant background fisheries data available
and considering the extent of the works proposed within the Study Area, further fisheries
sampling was not deemed warranted by Ecoplans.
The East Don River supports a variety of warmwater and coldwater baitfish and sportfish species
as indicated in Appendix A. Coldwater species include Mottled Sculpin (Cottus baiirdi), Brown
Trout (Salmo trutta) and Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss). The majority of the trout
species sampled that were found upstream, near Highway 407 and Bathurst Street. However,
Rainbow Trout was sampled recently (2005) immediately upstream of Yonge Street. In addition,
the following species have been captured in the East Don River within the vicinity of Yonge
Street: Blacknose Dace (Rhinichthys atratulus), Common Shiner (Luxilus comutus), Creek Chub
(Semotilus atromaculatus), Darter sp. (Etheostoma sp.), Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas),
Johnny Darter (Etheostoma caeruleum), Longnose Dace (Rhinichthys cataractae), Mottled
Sculpin (Cottus baiirdi), Northern Redbelly Dace (Phoxinus eos), Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus
mykiss) and White Sucker (Catostomus commersoni).
Although Pomona Mills Creek is classified as coldwater, TRCA fisheries records for stations
located approximately 780m (1949 database) downstream of Langstaff Road (closest station to
project limits), captured only warmwater fish species specifically Brook Stickleback (Culaea
inconstans), Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas) and Creek Chub (Semotilus
atromaculatus). More current information (1984) is available for a fish station located closer to
the East Don River mouth (approximately 2.44 km downstream of Langstaff Road). Species
captured here include Brook Stickleback (Culaea inconstans), Johnny Darter (Etheostoma
caeruleum), Common Shiner (Luxilus comutus), Pumpkinseed (Lepomis gibbosus), Northern
Redbelly Dace (Phoxinus eos), Fathead Minnow (Pimephales promelas), Blacknose Dace
(Rhinichthys atratulus) and Creek Chub (Semotilus atromaculatus).
There is no fisheries information available for the smaller tributaries (Tributary 2, and the
drainage feature draining to Pomona Mills Creek) within the Study Area. Tributary 2 is piped
underground within the study limits and both features will not be impacted by the Yonge Subway
development.
2.2.3 Aquatic Species at Risk
Background fisheries records indicate that two Species at Risk (SAR), Redside Dace
(Clinostomus elongates) and Northern Brook Lamprey (Ichthyomyson fossor) have been collected
within the vicinity, but outside of the Yonge Street Subway Study Area.
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Redside Dace (Clinostomus elongates) is designated provincially as Threatened by the
Committee on the Status of Species at Risk in Ontario (COSSARO) with a Provincial Rank of
Rare to Uncommon (S3). Its federal status, designated by the Committee on the Status of
Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC), has recently been elevated to Endangered.
Although not yet listed on Schedule 1 of the Species at Risk Act (SARA), this listing is pending.
The status of this species is also being reviewed by the Province.
The fish records obtained from TRCA in 2008 indicate that Redside Dace have been collected at
8 stations in the East Don River watershed, all outside of the Yonge Subway Study Area. Recent
records (within last 10 years) indicate that this species has been collected at 3 stations; all of
which are located north of Highway 407. Redside Dace were collected at the following locations:
• On the East Don River (main) approximately 4.3 km upstream of Yonge Street in 2005;
• In a minor tributary (unnamed) of the East Don River approximately 4.5 km upstream of
Yonge Street (immediately upstream of Bathurst Street) in 2005; and
• In a larger tributary of the East Don River, named Tributary 4, located approximately 6
km upstream of Yonge Street, immediately upstream of Carville Road, west of Bathhurst
Avenue in 2000.
Other records indicate Redside Dace was collected in the main East Don River in 1995 at a
Station located approximately 2.3 km upstream of Yonge Street. Downstream of Yonge Street,
records do exist but date back to 1985 and 1949, at two stations located approximately 2.55 km
downstream and 1.42 km downstream of Yonge Street respectively. There were no barriers noted
within the assessed reach of the East Don River by Ecoplans, and none outlined in previous
studies.
Species at Risk (SAR) distribution mapping, obtained from the Conservation Ontario website in
October 2008 indicates that stream segments within the study limits may support Redside Dace.
The East Don River, Pomona Mills Creek and the minor tributaries outlined on Figure 1 are all
mapped ORANGE, indicating the potential presence of Redside Dace. It is important to note that
not all segments outlined have been sampled for Redside Dace, therefore, the segments may
extend further than the actual species distribution (DFO 2007b) (or may not actually occur in
some mapped segments).
Another SAR, the Northern Brook Lamprey (Ichthyomyzon fossor), was collected by the TRCA
in the main branch of the East Don River west of the Study Area in 2002 and 2005,
approximately 5.3 km upstream of Yonge Street, between Bathurst Street and Carville Road. The
Great Lakes - Upper St Lawrence populations of this species are designated as Special Concern
by COSEWIC, and have a Provincial Rank of S3. This species is not listed under the SARA.
The records for both of these species are recent, however they were collected a considerable
distance from Yonge Street. The potential for Redside Dace to reside within the Study Area is
discussed further in Section 3.1.3.
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2.2.4 Ecoplans Surveys
Ecoplans completed a detailed habitat survey on the East Don River from approximately 100m
upstream and 200m downstream of Yonge Street on October 9, 2008. Detailed aquatic mapping
was completed within 50m upstream and downstream of Yonge Street, documenting the
parameters noted below. Data collection and mapping encompassed the following aquatic habitat
parameters:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
flow condition, clarity, general gradient and velocities
channel dimensions and general character
morphology (e.g. riffles, pools)
cover opportunities (i.e. woody debris, undercut banks, boulders, aquatic vegetation)
substrate type
bank height, character and stability/evidence of erosion
riparian vegetation
physical barriers to fish movement
potential specialized and important habitat areas including potential spawning habitat,
good nursery cover, holding habitat (deeper refuge pools)
evidence of groundwater discharge
disturbances, habitat limitations and potential habitat enhancement opportunities
A reconnaissance level habitat assessment was also conducted on October 9th at Pomona Mills
Creek as well as at the small drainage feature draining to this creek within the Study Area limits.
The following table provides a summary of the existing aquatic habitat conditions of the various
watercourses. This table compiles information from both LGL as well as Ecoplans’ field surveys
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Table 1. Aquatic Habitat Assessment Summary1
Ref
No.
1
Feature
East Don
River
Type of
Crossing
Round, open
bottom,
concrete
culvert (14m
x 14m x
60m)
Watercourse
Classification
Habitat Summary
2
Upstream
Downstream
Coldwater
• Avg. 7.5m wide (wetted);
• Avg. 8m wide (wetted),25-35
•
•
•
•
•
2
Pomona Mills
Creek
(Trib # 3)
Yonge Street
at Highway
407
Closed
concrete
box culvert
(5 m x 2.5
m x 200 m)
Coldwater
40 cm deep. Scouring
(1.5m+deep) at inlet from
large storm sewer outfall.
Good riparian cover
(moderate shading) by
overhanging Crack Willow,
Manitoba Maple, White
Elm, ash sp.
Good instream cover by
woody debris and detritus
Channelized (concrete
slabs on sections of bank
as stabilization measure)
Poor morphology- largely
flats
Fine substrates dominantsand with some boulders,
cobble
• Ranges 1-2m wide
(wetted); 8-30 cm deep.
• Channel flows through
meadow and forested
reach upstream of Yonge
Street.
• Good bank cover by
sedges and herbs within
~40m upstream of culver
and within forest (80%
cover) by Black Locust,
Manitoba Maple, Crack
Willow.
• Steep valley slope (2.5-3m
high) within ~40m
upstream of culvert.
•
•
•
•
•
•
cm in riffles, up to 95 cm
deep pools
Good riparian cover (well
shaded by forest). Species
include Crack Willow, Black
Walnut, Norway Maple,
Manitoba Maple.
Good in-stream cover by
woody debris and vegetation
(along banks)
Moderately stable banks
Mixed substrate- gravel
dominant, with sand,
boulders, cobble
Good stream morphology
(riffle/run -dominant and
pools)
Groundwater indicatorwatercress along bank edges
• Steep slopes on both
•
•
•
•
sides of stream
No shading
Poor morphology-largely flats
Poor instream cover
Rip-rap on sides close to
culvert
Key
Habitat
Functions
Flow
conditions
Drainage
Connectivity
Comments
Ideal
conditions
for Brown
trout and
Rainbow
Trout
spawning
on
downstrea
m (east)
side (in
riffles).
Medium
flow year
round
Main
drainage
system
Flows through
Thornhill Golf &
CC (upstream)
and Ladies of
Toronto Golf &CC
(downstream)
Potential
warmwater
baitfish
habitat
Medium
flow
Large storm
sewer outlets to
SW corner of
culvert.
Sediment-laden
water entering
stream through
sewer at the time
of Ecoplans
Survey
Good
• Storm sewer
inflow from
south-west
corner
Downstream side not
investigated by Ecoplans
1
LGL Limited data with additional information from Ecoplans October 9, 2008 surveys noted in italics
2
Classifications obtained from the TRCA (LGL Limited 2005)
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Ref
No.
Feature
Type of
Crossing
Watercourse
Classification
2
January 2009
Habitat Summary
Upstream
Downstream
Key
Habitat
Functions
Flow
conditions
Drainage
Connectivity
Comments
Poor
Channel
enclosed (piped
underground)
from SW corner
of High Tech
Woodlot, and
likely for entire
distance of
tributary (see
original tributary
location on Figure
1)
Goodhowever
culvert is
likely a
seasonal
barrier
(several
steps in
culvert
bottom 1520 cm high)
Landuse= Beaver
Stone
(landscaping).
Encroachment
into stream
corridor. Boulder,
rubble and gravel
sized shale and
soil dumped onto
east bank and
into creek.
• Poor morphology-largely
flats
• Fine substrates (Clay,
sand with some
gravel/cobble)
• Moderately stable banksbare banks (limited
understory growth) within
forested reach
• Groundwater indicatorwatercress along bank
edges
3/
12
Pomona Mills
Creek (Trib #
3) Yonge
Street at High
Tech Road
4
Pomona Mills
Creek (Trib
#3)
at Langstaff
Road
Coldwater
• Channel enclosed (piped
underground)
No direct
fish use
Enclosed in culvert
• Channelized
• Riparian vegetation provides
Upstream side not
investigated by Ecoplans
good cover (willow bush,
cattails, Common Reed
Grass, coltsfoot, nightshade,
goldenrod) however
vegetation disturbed by
dumping of rock/soil along
east bank (see comments)
• Moderately stable banks
• Fine substrate with some
large rubble.
• Poor morphology (flats
dominant)
Potential
warmwater
baitfish
habitat
• Ecoplans noted a swale
choked with Common
Reed Grass (Phragmites).
This swale flows along
south edge of HighTech
Road woodlot and drops
into catch basin here.
Closed
Concrete
Box Culvert
Coldwater
Medium
flow (slow
at time of
Ecoplans
survey)
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Ref
No.
5
13
Feature
Drainage
feature of
Pomona Mills
Creek at CN
Bala Line
Trib. #2
Yonge St.
Type of
Crossing
None
Watercourse
Classification
January 2009
Habitat Summary
2
Upstream
Downstream
Coldwater
• No habitat upstream,
No habitat downstream,
watercourse dry.
watercourse dry.
Ecoplans confirmed this in
October 2008 as well. No
defined channel observed
(4m wide cattail choked
dry swale).
Warmwater
Channel enclosed (piped
underground)
Key
Habitat
Functions
Flow
conditions
Drainage
Connectivity
Comments
No direct
fish use
likely
Ephemeral
flows
Poor
• Poorly defined
drainage
system (no
defined
channel,
ephemeral).
• Drains
industrial area
upstream of CN
line.
Not investigated by Ecoplans
No direct
fish use
Poor
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2.3
January 2009
Terrestrial Habitat
2.3.1 Vegetation Communities
Within the Study Area, vegetation communities were classified according to the Ecological Land
Classification for Southern Ontario: First Approximation and Its Application (Lee et al. 1998).
Communities documented were assessed using a plotless method for the purposes of determining
the general composition of the vegetation.
Due to the urban nature of in the Study Area, much of the vegetation is of anthropogenic origin,
resulting from past and present land uses. Six types of vegetation communities were identified
within the Study Area. These communities are cultural meadow, cultural woodland, coniferous
plantation, deciduous plantation, and two types of lowland deciduous forest. Table 2 provides a
description of the identified vegetation communities.
2.3.2 Flora Species at Risk
Within this Study Area, a total of 177 vascular plant species were recorded by LGL Limited
during their 2003 field work and by Ecoplans during their 2008 field work. More than half of
these species are considered introduced and non-native to southern Ontario. A combined LGL
Limited and Ecoplans working plant list of species recorded in the vegetation communities within
the Study Area is provided in Appendix B.
No provincially or federally designated vegetation SAR were documented during the field
surveys conducted in 2003 or 2008. Species identified as being locally uncommon or rare (i.e.
York Region or Greater Toronto Area (GTA)), or species ranked by TRCA as “species of
concern”, are noted and referenced in Appendix B. The TRCA “species of concern” addressed in
this report include species ranked as L1 to L4, meaning that they are of concern to TRCA
regionally and/or within the urban matrix. These species are listed and described below.
-
Red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) is planted and naturally occurring in the Study Area.
Several individuals of small shrub size are planted within the CUM1-1 community
surrounding the CNR corridor and naturally occurring in the CUM1-1 under the hydro lines
(Reference Site 15). Red cedar is considered uncommon in the Greater Toronto Area and the
Region of York. This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and updated by
Ecoplans in 2008.
-
Black walnut (Juglans nigra) is planted and naturalized in the Study Area. Planted
specimens are located on existing lawns and were also observed as naturalized in the CUW1,
CUP1-3, and FOD7-3 communities. Black walnut is considered rare in the Region of York.
This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and updated by Ecoplans in 2008.
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Table 2. Summary of ELC Vegetation Communities
ELC Code
Vegetation Type
Species Association
Terrestrial – Natural/Semi-natural
FOD
DECIDUOUS FOREST
Manitoba Maple (Acer negundo) dominated with Crack Willow (Salix X
FOD7
Fresh-Moist
Lowland Deciduous rubens), Weeping Willow (S. X sepulcralis), Black Walnut (Juglans
nigra), Trembling Aspen (Populus tremuloides), American elm (Ulmus
Forest Ecosite
americana), Alternate-leaved Dogwood (Cornus alternifolia), Red-osier
Dogwood (Cornus stolonifera), Staghorn Sumac (Rhus typhina),
Common Buckthorn (Rhamnus cathartica), Riverbank Grape (Vitis
riparia). The ground layer is dominated by Avens (Geum sp.) with
frequent Moneywort (Lysimachia nummularia), Garlic Mustard (Alliaria
petiolata), and Fringed Loosestrife (Lysimachia ciliata).
FOD7-3
Fresh-Moist Willow
Lowland Deciduous
Forest Type
This unit is most disturbed adjacent to Yonge Street where the
vegetation is dominated by non-native invasive species. The canopy is
dominated by Manitoba Maple and Black Locust (Robinia pseudoacacia) with Dog strangling vine (Cynanchum nigrum) and Daylily
(Hemerocallis sp.) in the ground layer.
Willow dominated with Manitoba Maple, Black Locust, Black Walnut,
Siberian Elm (Ulmus pumila), Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum), Norway
Maple (Acer platanoides), Trembling Aspen, American Elm, Alternateleaved Dogwood, Red-osier Dogwood, Staghorn Sumac, Common
Buckthorn, Riverbank Grape. The ground layer is dominated by Ground
Ivy (Glechoma hederacea), Dame’s Rocket (Hesperis matronalis),
Spotted Jewelweed (Impatiens capensis) and Garlic Mustard.
Terrestrial – Cultural
CUP
CULTURAL PLANTATION
Black walnut dominated with American Elm, Siberian Elm, Black Locust,
CUP1-3
Black Walnut
Norway Maple, Manitoba Maple, Silver Maple, Sugar Maple (Acer
Deciduous
saccharum), Choke Cherry (Prunus virginiana), Tartarian Honeysuckle
Plantation Type
(Lonicera tatarica) and ground cover predominantly Garlic Mustard.
There were many recently planted native trees and shrubs in the north
half of this unit. It is estimated that they were planted in the last few
years.
Comments
This community type is on the east side of Yonge Street
along the main branch of the East Don River.
Reference Numbers: 1
This community type is well west of Yonge Street on
surrounding Pomona Mills Creek.
Reference Number: 2
This community is located in the east half of a small
woodland that is located at the southeast corner of Yonge
Street and High Tech Road and is associated with a
Coniferous Plantation (CUP3).
There is abundant
regeneration of a variety of tree and shrub species. In the
understory and sub-canopy of this unit.
Reference Number: 3
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ELC Code
Vegetation Type
Species Association
Comments
CUP3
Coniferous
Plantations
Predominantly Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris), Norway spruce (Picea
abies) with Common Buckthorn, Choke Cherry, Avens, Garlic Mustard
and Dame’s Rocket.
A small patch of this community type is located in the
southwest portion of a small woodland that is located on the
Southeast corner of Yonge Street and High Tech Road and
is associated with a deciduous plantation (CUP1). There is
abundant regeneration of a variety of tree and shrub species.
In the understory and sub-canopy of this unit.
CUM
CUM1-1
CULTURAL MEADOW
Dry-Moist Old Field
Goldenrod (Solidago spp.), Wild Carrot (Daucus carota), Grasses (Poa
Meadow Type
spp.), Teasel (Dipsacus sylvestris), Asters (Aster spp.), Staghorn Sumac,
Red Cedar (Juniperus virginiana), Common Buckthorn
Reference Number: 3
CUW
CUW1
Reference area 5:
There is a mature Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) that is 132 cm dbh
and reportedly 200 years old however this has not been validated. It is in
good condition. The tree has a full crown of natural shape and minor
dead wood however there is abundant twig dieback and epicormic
branching, possibly due to salt spray. It is located at 17626346N,
4855128E (UTM NAD83), approximately 55 m from the Yonge Street
right-of-way.
CULTURAL WOODLAND
Mineral Cultural
Woodland Ecosite
Along the main branch of the East Don River:
Manitoba Maple, Norway Maple, Crack Willow, Black Locust, Black
Walnut, Siberian Elm, White Mulberry (Morus alba), Common
Buckthorn. The ground layer is dominated by Dog Strangling Vine with
frequent Avens, Garlic Mustard, and Ground Ivy.
This community type is the predominant community type
throughout the Study Area. It surrounds the rail tracks
between Glen Cameron Road and Meadowview Avenue and
it surrounds the Yonge Street-Highway 407 interchange. In
the north half of the Study Area this community type is often
mixed with sites of active development.
Reference Numbers: 2, 4, 5, 14, 15,
This community type is on the west side of Yonge Street
along the main branch of the East Don River and
approximately 125 m north of the main branch of the East
Don River.
Reference Numbers: 1
125 m north of the main branch of the East Don River:
The canopy is dominated by Norway Maple and Black Locust with Black
Walnut and Common Buckthorn. The ground layer is dominated by
Garlic Mustard with Common Burdock (Arctium minus), Canada
Goldenrod (Solidago canadensis), and Avens.
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-
Tower mustard (Arabis glabra) is a weedy native species. Individuals of this species are
located within the CUM1-1 community surrounding the CNR corridor, approximately 50 m
from the current Yonge Street right-of-way. Tower mustard is considered rare in the Greater
Toronto Area and the Region of York and is considered a species of concern by the TRCA.
This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003.
-
Swamp tickseed (Bidens tripartita) was found growing along the banks of Ponoma Mills
Creek of the East Don River, approximately 30 m from the current Yonge Street right-ofway. Swamp tickseed is considered uncommon in the Greater Toronto Area. Record of this
species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003.
-
Beech wood sedge (Carex cf. laxiflora) was found growing along the banks of the main
branch of the East Don River, approximately 30 m from the current Yonge Street right-ofway. Beech wood sedge is considered uncommon in the Greater Toronto Area and the Region
of York. This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003.
-
Spotted water hemlock (Cicuta maculata) was found growing in moist ditches within the
CUM1-1 community surrounding the CNR corridor, approximately 50 m from the current
Yonge Street right-of-way. Spotted water hemlock is considered uncommon in the Region of
York. This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003.
-
Virginia wild-rye (Elymus virginicus) was found growing in two patches within the CUP13/CUP3 community, approximately 20 m and 70 m from the current Yonge Street right-ofway. Virginia wild-rye is considered uncommon in the Region of York. This species was
observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and updated by Ecoplans in 2008.
-
Beggar’s lice (Hackelia virginiana) was found growing within the CUP1-3/CUP3 community
approximately 20 m from the current Yonge Street right-of-way and in the CUW1
approximately 15 m west of Yonge Street right-of-way on the north side of main branch of
the East Don River. Beggar’s lice is considered uncommon in the Greater Toronto Area and
rare in the Region of York. This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and updated
by Ecoplans in 2008.
-
Silver Maple (Acer saccharinum) was observed in the central portion of the CUP1-3/CUP3
community and in the FOD7-3 community. It is ranked by TRCA as L4. This species was
observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and verified by Ecoplans Limited in 2008.
-
Jack in the Pulpit (Arisaema triphyllum ssp triphyllum) was observed in the CUP1-3/CUP3
community approximately 50 m from the current Yonge Street right-of-way. It is ranked by
TRCA as L4. This species was observed by LGL Limited in 2003 and verified by Ecoplans
in 2008.
-
Bur Oak (Quercus macrocarpa) was observed in a CUM1-1 community (Reference Site 5)
beside a stormwater management pond. It is listed by TRCA as special concern. As noted in
Table X, this is a mature tree that is 132 cm dbh and is in good condition and is
approximately 55 m from the existing Yonge Street right-of-way. This species was observed
by Ecoplans in 2008.
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January 2009
Slippery Elm (Ulmus rubra) was observed in CUP1-3/CUP3 (Reference Site 3). Several of
these trees were observed in the north west corner of this unit. It is ranked by TRCA as L4.
This species was observed by Ecoplans in 2008.
Several other species listed as locally rare or ranked as a species of concern by TRCA and
recorded in the Study Area by LGL Limited in 2003 and Ecoplans in 2008 were identified as
being planted. Since these species were introduced to the site through anthropogenic means, they
are not considered of concern from a natural environmental perspective. These species, their
locations and their status are listed below.
-
Common Hackberry (Celtis occidentalis) – north portion of CUP1-3, rare in GTA
American Witch-hazel (Hamamelis virginiana) – north portion of CUP1-3, uncommon in
York Region and ranked L3 by TRCA
Fragrant Sumac (Rhus aromatica) – west edge of CUP3, near southern limit, rare in GTA and
rare in York Region
Red Oak (Quercus rubra) – north portion of CUP1-3, ranked L4 by TRCA
White Pine (Pinus strobus) - north portion of CUP1-3, ranked L4 by TRCA
Red Pine (Pinus resinosa) – CUP3, ranked L1 by TRCA.
Common juniper (Juniperus communis) - CUM1-1 along CNR corridor, considered rare in
the Greater Toronto Area and the Region of York and is ranked L3 by TRCA.
One additional species observed by LGL Limited, White Spruce (Picea glauca), is ranked as L3
by the TRCA, but is also typically introduced to urban areas for landscape trees. Due to the
highly altered landscape in which these trees were observed, it is expected that they are of
anthropogenic origin and not native populations. This species was observed in reference sites 4,
5, 12, and 15.
2.3.3 Wildlife and Wildlife Habitat
Field investigations were conducted by LGL Limited in 2003 to document wildlife habitat and
characterize the nature, extent and significance of animal usage within the project limits. Wildlife
was recorded through direct observation, vocalization or other evidence including tracks, scat,
odours or browse. Significant Wildlife Habitat was characterized using the Significant Wildlife
Habitat Technical Guide (SWHTG) (OMNR 2000). Although some units contain features
identified in the SWHTG, they are of low quality or small size and therefore not considered to be
significant in the province or local area. The results of this analysis are provided in Table 3. The
conclusions reported by LGL were reviewed by Ecoplans during their field investigations in
2008.
Due to the urban nature of the Study Area, wildlife habitat is primarily limited to open habitat of
anthropogenic origin with few natural heritage features. Species within this urban habitat are
typically very tolerant of human disturbance. Species that are expected to use habitats in the
Study Area include Eastern Cottontail, Ground Hog, Raccoon, Fox and other small mammals.
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Due to the disturbed nature of the Study Area, and its setting in a very busy urban core, it is not
expected to provide habitat for sensitive or rare wildlife.
The natural areas surrounding the main branch of the East Don River Valley are the most
noteworthy habitats within the Study Area. They are comprised of lowland deciduous forest,
cultural woodland and cultural meadow. This valley has the highest potential to provide wildlife
movement within the Study Area and local area. The hydro corridor also provides a relatively
large area of cultural meadow habitat for urban adapted wildlife, but due to the presence of a
major road barrier (6 lane Yonge Street) at its eastern limit, it is not considered an unimpeded
wildlife movement corridor. This area could provide habitat for the tolerant mammals identified
above. Additionally, Red-tailed Hawk was observed in this area and probably hunts in the
meadow for small mammals, and local residents report observations of White-tailed Deer.
2.3.4 Fauna Species at Risk
Records of wildlife species at risk within the project limits from the MNR (NHIC 2008) were
reviewed by LGL Limited in 2003 using on-line databases; this review was updated by Ecoplans
in 2008. No terrestrial wildlife listed under the SARA or the Endangered Species Act were
recorded in the Study Area. No terrestrial wildlife species of management concern beyond the
local level (upper tier municipal jurisdiction) were identified during field investigations. LGL
Limited observations reported that Milk Snake, a reptile species designated as Special Concern by
the COSEWIC, was recorded outside the Study Area in the Herpetofauna Atlas (Oldham and
Weller 2000). Milk Snake was not observed in the Study Area during field investigations by
LGL Limited in 2003 and Ecoplans in 2008.
During field investigations completed by LGL in 2003, 37 bird species and 13 mammal species
were observed in the vicinity of the broader Study Area between 19th Avenue and Steeles
Avenue. Of these, 12 birds are considered local species of concern. Since no locations of these
wildlife observations were provided in LGL’s report, these species may or may not use habitats
within the Yonge Subway Extension Study Area.
These species are: Sharp-shinned Hawk (Accipiter striatus), American Goldfinch (Carduelis
tristis_ Black-throated Blue Warbler (Dendroica caerulescens), Gray Catbird (Dumetella
carolinensis), Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica), Northern Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos),
Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis), Black-capped Chickadee (Poecile atricapillus),
Eastern Phoebe (Sayornis phoebe), Northern Rough-winged Sparrow (Stelgidopteryx
serripennis), Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus) and White-throated Sparrow (Zonotrichia
albicollis). These species have been identified by Bird Studies Canada (BSC) as species of
conservation priority (Couturier 1999). Five birds (Sharp-shinned Hawk, Great Blue Heron
(Ardea Herodias), Black-throated Blue Warbler, Wilson’s Snipe (Gallinago delicata), and Whitethroated Sparrow) and one mammal (weasel) have been identified by TRCA as species of concern
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January 2009
within TRCA’s jurisdiction (TRCA 2004). Three birds (Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis),
Belted Kingfisher (Ceryle alcyon and Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata) are protected under the Fish
and Wildlife Conservation Act and 31 birds are protected under the Migratory Birds Convention
Act.
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Table 3. Wildlife Habitat Assessment Summary
Ref
No.
Feature
1
East Don
River at
Yonge Street
Type of
Habitat
Habitat Function
Seasonal
Concentration of
Animals
Rare Vegetation
Communities or
Specialized Habitats for
Wildlife
Species of
Conservation
Concern
Animal Movement
Corridors
West side of
Yonge Street:
CUW1
East side of
Yonge Street:
FOD7
• Limited potential for
• No rare vegetation
• Locally
• The large concrete
landbird migratory stop
over area (suitable
habitat structure)
Comments
communities present
• Limited potential for
significant
species
specialized wildlife
habitat
• Forest is mid-aged to
mature; hard to replace,
however portions are
dominated by invasive
species
• Golf course near site
culvert/bridge shows
evidence of being used
for local east/west
movement of wildlife
including raccoons,
deer, muskrat and
some birds
• Small, closed canopy
forest patches may
facilitate seasonal
migration corridor for
birds and mammals
• River goes through forest
• No indication of
herpetofauna
• Possible mink denning
area
• Foraging area for wildlife
2
Pomona Mills
Creek
(Trib # 3)
Yonge Street
at Highway
407
FOD7-3
CUM1-1
• Small cattail marsh
inclusion may provide
habitat for nesting
blackbirds
• No rare vegetation
communities or
specialized wildlife
habitat present
• No trees directly
adjacent to right-of-way
• Surrounded by
development
• Locally
significant
species
• Isolated forest patch
with no natural
connections to other
natural areas
(separated from other
natural areas by major
roads and
development)
• Site highly developed
and isloated; small
pocket of grassland and
cattail marsh next to
stream and a small
lowland forest more than
50 m from Yonge Street
ROW
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Ref
No.
Feature
3
Pomona Mills
Creek (Trib #
3) Yonge
Street at High
Tech Road
January 2009
Type of
Habitat
Habitat Function
Seasonal
Concentration of
Animals
Rare Vegetation
Communities or
Specialized Habitats for
Wildlife
Species of
Conservation
Concern
Animal Movement
Corridors
East side:
CUP13/CUP3
• Limited potential for
• No rare vegetation
• Locally
• Isolated forest patch
landbird migratory stop
over
Comments
communities or
specialized wildlife
habitat present
significant
species
• Mid-aged to Mature
forest plantation with
several gaps in canopy
• No above water source
• Surrounded by
with no natural
connections to other
natural areas
(separated from other
natural areas by major
roads and
development)
• Stream enclosed (piped
underground)
development
4
Pomona Mills
Creek (Trib
#3)
at Langstaff
Road)
CUM1-1
• Limited potential for
landbird migratory stop
over area (migratory
birds present)
• No rare vegetation
• No significant
• Concrete culvert shows
communities or
specialized wildlife
habitat present
species of
conservation
concern were
recorded
evidence of raccoon
movement through it to
other side of highway
• Small tree cluster along
watercourse
• One main water source
and two side channels of
water run through site
• Foraging area for wildlife
• Residential development
near site
5
15
Drainage
feature of
Pomona Mills
Creek at CN
Bala Line
Cultural
Meadow
under hydro
CUM1-1 and
Storm water
management
pond (SWMP)
CUM1-1
• Limited potential for
waterfowl stopover
area at SWMP,
however this features
is under hydro lines
and approximately 100
m east of Yonge Street
• None present
• No rare vegetation
communities or
specialize wildlife habitat
present
• Residential development
• No significant
• None evident
• One mature Bur Oak
observed
species of
conservation
concern were
recorded
near site
• No rare vegetation
communities or
• No significant
species of
• None evident due to
major movement barrier
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Ref
No.
Feature
lines
Type of
Habitat
January 2009
Habitat Function
Seasonal
Concentration of
Animals
Comments
Rare Vegetation
Communities or
Specialized Habitats for
Wildlife
specialize wildlife habitat
present
Species of
Conservation
Concern
conservation
concern were
recorded
Animal Movement
Corridors
to the east (Yonge
Street)
This table is based on a report by LGL(2005). Where updates have been made by Ecoplans, the text is italicized.
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2.3.5 Wetlands
There are no provincially significant or non-provincially significant wetlands located within the
Study Area. No unevaluated wetlands were observed during field investigations.
3.0 Environmental Impacts and Proposed Mitigation Measures
3.1
Proposed Works
The proposed works at the main branch of the East Don River Valley involve removing the
existing open bottom concrete arch culvert (46 m length x 12 m width x 5.8 m height) and
replacing it with a bridge structure. The construction of the bridge will be adequately staged to
minimize impacts to the valley and the residents of the area. The works will include the
construction of a temporary detour road; the construction of the bridge; the removal of the
existing culvert and naturalization of the valley.
The new bridge will clear span the river with bridge piers and abutments in the valley. It is
proposed to be a 3-span structure approximately 150 m of total length, the middle span measuring
75m, with 37.5 m spans on either side. The bridge will measure approximately 7.3 m high (1.5
metres above the crown of the existing arch structure). The proposed bridge will present a double
deck similar to the Danforth viaduct of the Bloor Subway Line over the Don Valley Parkway,
with the road on top of the subway box. Once the bridge is in operation, the culvert will be
removed and the valley naturalized. There are no details available on the logistics of the existing
arch culvert removal at this stage.
The temporary detour road will be built immediately (a few metres) upstream (west) side of the
existing Yonge Street roadway. This detour road will utilize the existing concrete culvert and
will not require an extension of the existing culvert. The detour road will accommodate up to 4
lanes of traffic and walking facilities, and will measure a total of 14m wide, with an embankment
extending at a 2:1 slope to the west limit of the existing culvert. Temporary retaining walls will
be built at the toe of the slope to limit the intrusion of the widened slope into the valley.
Additional works associated with the project include construction of subway station buildings and
a potential “park and ride” station and the tunnelling for the subway construction.
All tunnel ingress and egress locations are located within parking lots or within Yonge Street.
Specifically:
• The tunneling for the subway will start at Richmond Hill Centre in the middle of a
parking lot and be pulled out near Royal Orchard Station in the middle of the road.
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Tunneling will start again at Steeles ( in the middle of the road) and be pulled out
approximately 100 m south of East Don River (in the middle of the road).
• Tunneling will start again at Steeles (in the middle of the road) and be pulled out at
Cummer/Drewry Station (in the middle of the road).
Between Royal Orchard Station and 100 m south of the East Don River the works will be
completed through open cut within the road allowance. This section also encompasses the bridge
works discussed above.
3.2
Fisheries and Aquatic Habitat
3.2.1 Potential Impacts
Anticipated impacts to fisheries and aquatic habitat as a result of the above ground works
described above are outlined in the following bullets.
The Preliminary Geotechnical Report produced by Golder & Associates concluded that, based on
the level of investigation completed thus far, it is anticipated that the effects on any groundwater
flow on nearby watercourses (East Don River and Pomona Creek),as a result of the project if any,
will be maintained to environmentally acceptable levels through appropriate combinations of
dewatering, groundwater inflow mitigation measures, and contingency plans developed through
the course of additional investigations, detailed design, and continued consultation with the
TRCA and MOE regulatory agencies.
East Don River
• No in-water works will be required for construction of the East Don River Bridge and the
temporary detour road. The new bridge will clear span the river with bridge piers and
abutments in the valley but removed from the channel.
• No permanent impacts to the watercourse (loss of habitat) will occur.
• Temporary in-water works will be required for the removal of the existing concrete arch
culvert, with associated localized disturbance of stream bed required to remove the
existing culvert footings. The affected reach consists of deep pool habitat at the existing
culvert inlet zone and through the upstream end of the culvert. This pool habitat has
formed as a result of scouring from storm run-off exiting the large Storm Sewer outlet
located on the south bank, immediately upstream of the existing arch culvert. Riffle
habitat exists within the downstream half of the culvert as well as downstream of the
culvert outlet. Gravel and sand are dominant through the area, with coarser substrate
(cobbles, boulders) evident at the culvert outlet.
• Riparian vegetation potentially impacted by the removal of existing culvert includes a
large Weeping Willow located on the north bank, immediately upstream of the existing
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culvert inlet and small White Elm and Manitoba Maple in addition to embankment
removals outlined in Table 2 and Section 3.2.2 The existing road embankment is
dominated by highly disturbed and dominated by invasive species. Primary species
include Black Locust, Norway Maple, Manitoba Maple, Weeping Willow, Black Walnut,
Siberian Elm, and Dog-strangling Vine
• Potential indirect impacts during the temporary in-water works and adjacent construction
activity (e.g. erosion and sediment influx or disturbance and downstream transfer, other
water quality impacts, entry of debris into water, interception of flow, potential
disturbance of fish) can be managed using appropriate mitigation and restoration
measures.
No permanent impacts are anticipated to result from the operation and maintenance associated
with the Yonge Street Subway Extension. Future maintenance activities would not be expected to
involve any in-water works once the bridge crossing is constructed to span the East Don River, or
any new permanent footprint impacts. Therefore, potential impacts should be limited to
temporary disturbance-related impacts that can be addressed using standard mitigation measures
While there will be minor impacts as a result of the proposed construction, they are limited to
localized terrestrial areas and potential disturbance during construction. The new much longer
bridge span ultimately provides an overall net benefit to the East Don River and valley crossing,
as outlined below:
• The proposed bridge will have a significantly smaller footprint in the valley compared to
the existing fill embankment and culvert crossing.
• Following removal of the culvert, the much wider bridge span will enable re-instatement
of a natural channel section through the crossing as well as future ‘natural’ migration of
the channel;
• The much wider and higher bridge span will improve wildlife movement opportunities
along the valley system.
• Removal of the existing embankments provides the opportunity to remove the existing
invasive-dominated vegetation and re-instate more natural cover on the smaller
embankment footprint.
Other Watercourses
Several tributaries of the East Don River lie within the vicinity of Yonge Street as outlined in the
Existing Conditions discussion above. There will be no direct impact to these watercourses by
the proposed Yonge Street Subway works.
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3.2.2 Mitigation Measures
As outlined above, the proposed above ground works are generally limited to localized impacts
associated with removal of the existing East Don River structure. The need for a Fisheries Act
Authorization (FAA) will be determined at the detailed design phase, once all of the potential
impacts and proposed mitigation and monitoring measures have been fully identified. However,
based on consultation with TRCA, it appears at this point that all above ground impacts will be
fully mitigated, and therefore an authorization under the FAA is not anticipated (TRCA, pers.
comm. November 19, 2008).
The associated impacts to the East Don River should be minor, with the implementation of
appropriate mitigation measures. To avoid and minimize the potential construction-related
impacts of the project on fish and aquatic habitat in the East Don River, the following mitigation
measures will be implemented to the furthest extent possible:
• An in-water construction timing restriction will be implemented during the removal of
the existing culvert and naturalization of the channel, to protect the coldwater fishery.
No in-water work will be permitted from September 16 to June 30.
• Although DFO’s SAR mapping maps the subject reaches as part of the broader reach that
supports Redside Dace, this species has not been caught during sampling in the vicinity
of the bridge and TRCA has indicated that the habitat conditions are not ideal at this
location (TRCA pers. comm. November 19, 2008). On this basis, a SAR permit should
not be required for any instream works. As outlined earlier in Section 2.2.3, the status
of Redside Dace is currently under review by the Province. Further consultation with
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources staff with regards to permitting under the
Endangered Species Act may be required. .
• Stringent erosion and sediment control measures will be implemented and maintained
during the construction period and all disturbed surfaces draining to the river will be
stabilized and re-vegetated following construction.
It is recommended that a
comprehensive erosion and sediment control plan be developed during detailed design.
This plan must meet the requirements, guidelines and design standards provided in
TRCA’s 2006 Erosion and Sediment Control Guidelines for Urban Construction,
• An appropriate containment system will be specified during detailed design to prevent
construction debris associated with the removal of the existing culvert and construction
of the new bridge from entering the river.
• Any material that is inadvertently dropped into the watercourse will be retrieved
carefully with minimal disturbance to the channel bed or banks.
• Any temporarily stockpiled material, construction or related materials will be properly
contained (e.g. within silt fencing) in areas separated at least 30m from the watercourses.
All construction materials and debris will be removed and appropriately disposed of
following construction.
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• Temporary flow management measures during removal of the existing culvert and reinstatement of the natural channel will be implemented to ensure that the construction
area is fully isolated from the main stream and clean flow is maintained downstream at
all times. The appropriate technique will be determined based on flow volumes and the
duration of the works during detailed design. .
• Any fish stranded within the temporary work zones will be removed using appropriate
techniques by qualified individuals and released downstream of the temporary work
zones.
• No equipment shall ford or otherwise enter any of the watercourses except as specified
herein or unless authorized by MNR or TRCA.
• Only clean materials free of fine particulate matter will be placed in the water for
temporary construction measures (e.g. coffer dams will be constructed of ‘pea gravel’
bags, geotextile fabric or other clean material) or permanent works (e.g. substrate
material).
• All activity will be controlled so as to prevent entry of any petroleum products, debris or
other potential contaminants/deleterious substances, in addition to sediment as outlined
above, to the watercourses. No storage, maintenance or refueling of equipment will be
conducted near the watercourses. A Spills Prevention and Response Plan will be
developed by the Contractor and kept on site at all times.
• Any areas draining to the river or riparian vegetation that are temporarily disturbed to
access the culvert will be re-vegetated and any woody vegetation that is removed in the
valley will be replaced. Only native species compatible with the riparian habitat along
the East Don River will be used as outlined in the Terrestrial Mitigation Strategy.
• An environmental inspector experienced in working around watercourses will be
responsible for ensuring that all environmental mitigation and design measures are
properly installed/constructed and maintained, and appropriate contingency and response
plans are in place and implemented if required.
• An Environmental Management Plan (EMP) will be developed during detailed design
and may incorporate additional mitigation measures as required to protect aquatic
habitat.
Design-Related Measures
The structure should be designed to avoid direct drainage into the river. Drainage should be
directed to the floodplain areas away from the river, rather than directly to the water, enhancing
the existing condition.
The proposed naturalization of the presently enclosed section of the East Don River through the
future bridge crossing will be developed during detailed design. The channel through the bridge
reach as well reaches immediately upstream and downstream of the Proposed Bridge will be
constructed using naturalized principles, to maintain or enhance the existing habitat within this
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Yonge Subway Extension
Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
reach. The design will be developed by appropriately qualified individuals (e.g. hydrologists or
fluvial geomorphologists and fisheries biologists) with experience in channel design. Specific
aspects of the design will include:
• the creation of a stable, naturally functioning channel section that transitions smoothly
with up and downstream sections of the channel to preclude development of potential
barriers to fish movement;
• re-instatement of natural channel form, morphology, substrates and cover elements;
• re-instatement of vegetation cover (where light permits) under the new structure;
• planting of a mix of native shrubs and trees along the channel edges and in the riparian
area impacted.
In addition to the above, the existing scour pool (+1.5m deep) located at the inlet of the structure
should be retained in the naturalization design for the new channel section, as pool habitat and
potential refuge habitat for fish. The pool also functions to provide energy dissipation for the
stormwater outlet. This pool has formed as a result of scouring from the stormwater discharge
from the existing storm outlet, which is located on the south bank opposite the structure inlet.
This storm outlet consists of a concrete bottom chute that appears to function to increase
velocities out of the storm outlet to the north corner of the existing arched culvert. Additional
pool habitat could also be incorporated into the design further downstream for dissipation and
habitat use if deemed appropriate. Opportunities to enhance the functioning of the stormwater
outfall could also be considered during detailed design, to reduce the scouring action and flux of
silt observed entering the river. TRCA shall be contacted prior to any proposal to re-design
existing outfalls as part of this project.
Hardened bank stability measures (concrete slabs and gabion structures) currently line the channel
banks upstream of the existing structure inlet. Opportunities to remove these structures and
replace them using ‘bioengineered designs’ to stabilize the banks and bed (e.g. live crib walls,
live rock revetments, cabled log jams) within the rehabilitation zone should also be reviewed
during detailed design, to enhance the existing situation. Similarly, opportunities to remove the
concrete slabs that currently line the bank further upstream of the inlet and re-naturalize the banks
should also be reviewed during detailed design. The Ontario Stream Rehabilitation Manual
Version 1.0 (http://www.ontariostreams.on.ca/OSRM/toc.htm) provides several examples of
bioengineering techniques and habitat enhancement designs.
3.3
Vegetation, Wildlife and Terrestrial Habitat
3.3.1 Potential Impacts
Anticipated impacts to vegetation, wildlife and terrestrial habitat as a result of above ground
works as described in Section 3.1, are outlined in the following bullets.
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Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
The Preliminary Geotechnical Report produced by Golder & Associates concluded that, based on
the level of investigation completed thus far, it is anticipated that the effects on any groundwater
flow,as a result of the project if any, will be maintained to environmentally acceptable levels
through appropriate combinations of dewatering, groundwater inflow mitigation measures, and
contingency plans developed through the course of additional investigations, detailed design, and
continued consultation with the TRCA and MOE regulatory agencies.
• No vegetation removals are required for tunnel ingress and egress locations, since all are
located within parking lots or within Yonge Street.
• Vegetation removals will be required on the existing road embankment (which will be
removed) at the East Don River crossing. The vegetation on the embankment is highly
disturbed and dominated by invasive species. Primary species include Black Locust,
Norway Maple, Manitoba Maple, Weeping Willow, Black Walnut, Siberian Elm, and
Dog-strangling Vine. A small patch of one species considered rare in York Region
(Beggar’s Lice) was located at the base of the embankment on the west side of Yonge
Street and will be removed during construction. This species is commonly encountered
in the Greater Toronto Area and was also found elsewhere is the Study Area (CUP31/CUP1). No impacts to any other locally or regionally rare species observed in the
study area are anticipated.
• Cultural meadow vegetation along a hydro corridor, south of Highway 407 and west of
Yonge Street, will be removed for a potential park and ride station. The vegetation in
this area is dominated by common, disturbance tolerant species such as Brome Grass,
Canada Goldenrod, Heath Aster and Common Buckthorn. This area also provides early
successional habitat for urban adapted wildlife including birds and small mammals.
• There may also be limited removals of urban and landscape vegetation for the
construction of subway stations.
• Potential for localized indirect impacts such as edge impacts (windthrow, sunscald,
changes in light conditions), invasion of exotic or other aggressive species, and minor
drainage modifications (e.g., minor changes in surface area of paved surfaces or direction
of flow off paved surfaces) may occur as a result of the construction, but these impacts
can be managed through appropriate mitigation and restoration measures.
• Additional impacts to wildlife during construction and operation will be limited, since
wildlife present will likely be tolerant to the existing urban conditions of noise and light.
• Migratory birds can nest on buildings and vegetation (including street trees) and nesting
and breeding activity can be impacted if construction occurs during the breeding season.
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Yonge Subway Extension
Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
3.3.2 Mitigation Measures
To minimize direct impacts to vegetation and associated habitat features along Yonge Street and
specifically in the East Don River valley and to protect adjacent vegetation/habitat features from
indirect impacts during construction, the following mitigation measures will be implemented to
the furthest extent possible:
• A re-vegetation and enhancement plan will be developed for the East Don River valley.
• The bridge structure design and valley enhancement plan will specifically target
opportunities to improve wildlife movement, including provision of a stable overbank
area for wildlife movement as well as vegetation planting and placement of cover
elements at the ends of and through the structure to create smooth transitions with the
existing valley vegetation and encourage wildlife movement through the structure.
• Vegetation clearing zones and vegetation retention zones will be clearly delineated in
both the Contract documents and in the field to minimize the risk of unnecessary or
inadvertent vegetation impacts and avoid incidental impacts as a result of temporary
stockpiling, debris disposal and access. Works zones will be delineated in the field using
construction fencing to minimize the area of disturbance and prevent disturbance of
adjacent areas.
• The East Don River valley will be identified as a ‘priority protection area’ on Contract
Drawings to restrict contractor activities in these areas.
• Appropriate vegetation clearing techniques (e.g., trees to be felled away from the
retained natural areas) will be used to remove vegetation required for the proposed
works.
• Stringent erosion and sediment control measures will be designed, implemented and
maintained throughout construction. This includes installing sediment and erosion
control fencing along the edge of the required working area to protect the edges of all
retained natural areas, as well as proper containment and filtering of all constructiongenerated sediment (whether from dewatering or soil exposure from clearing and
grubbing).
• All exposed surfaces will be re-stabilized and re-vegetated as soon as possible following
construction, using an appropriate seed mix.
• The valley enhancement plan will be developed during detailed design with input from
TRCA. This will include replacement of woody vegetation removed for construction
and enhancement of the valley cover and linkage generally. Only native species
representative of the local area and valley habitats will be used.
• All construction-related debris will be appropriately contained during construction and
cleaned-up and properly disposed of following construction.
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Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
• All activity will be controlled so as to prevent entry of any petroleum products, debris or
other potential contaminants/deleterious substances, in addition to sediment as outlined
above, to natural areas and particularly the East Don River valley. No storage,
maintenance or refueling of equipment will be conducted within the valley. A Spills
Prevention and Response Plan will be developed by the Contractor and kept on site at all
times.
• An environmental inspector will be responsible for ensuring that all environmental
mitigation and design measures are properly installed/constructed, implemented and
maintained, and appropriate contingency, response plans and remedial measures are in
place and implemented if required.
In addition to protecting vegetation, which in turn protects the associated habitat functions, it is
necessary to ensure the protection of breeding birds (in accordance with the MCBA) that may
nest or otherwise use areas where construction is proposed. Numerous birds located within the
project limits are listed under the MBCA. The MBCA prohibits the killing, capturing, injuring,
taking or disturbing of migratory birds (including eggs) or the damaging, destroying, removing or
disturbing of nests. Migratory insectivorous and non-game birds are protected year-round, while
migratory game birds are only protected from March 10 to September 1. No permit can be issued
for the destruction of migratory birds or their nests incidental to some other undertaking or
activity.
Measures for the protection of migratory birds, as well as protection of all wildlife generally,
include:
• To meet the requirements of the MBCA, timing constraints will be applied to avoid
vegetation clearing during the breeding bird season (May 1st to July 31st).
• If clearing cannot avoid the breeding bird season, then an avian biologist will be
employed to conduct a nest survey in the area to be cleared. If active nests of migratory
birds are located then a mitigation plan will be developed and approved by Environment
Canada prior to clearing. This may involve delays to allow for fledging.
• The nest survey will also include the East Don River culvert to ensure that birds such as
swallow species or Eastern Phoebe are not nesting in it. No bird activity was observed
during the 2008 field visit, however there is potential for nest building in the culvert.
Any “inactive” nests (previous season nests, and nests where adult birds are not seen
flying in and out) should be removed before construction.
• No active nests will be removed/disturbed in accordance with the MBCA.
• Any wildlife incidentally encountered during construction will not be knowingly harmed.
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Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
3.4
January 2009
Future Commitments
In this report, potential impacts to the natural environment from above ground works were
addressed and appropriate mitigation measures outlined to minimize these impacts. During the
subsequent detailed design phase, the mitigation measures will be refined and finalized based on
the final design details for the proposed East Don River Bridge, the logistics of the existing East
Don structure removal and other above ground works associated with the Yonge Subway. In
addition, input from agencies and the public will be integrated into the mitigation strategies.
The Natural Environment Report did not specifically address impacts to the natural environment
as a result of proposed dewatering works. However, based on the level of hydrogeological
investigation completed thus far, it is anticipated that the effects on any groundwater flow on
nearby watercourses (East Don River and Pomona Creek), as a result of the project if any, will be
minor (Delcan 2009). These potential effects will be reviewed and assessed further during
detailed design and the mitigation, monitoring and contingency plans will be developed in
consultation with and accordance with TRCA’s Guidelines for Dewatering Needs Assessment
and Environmental Management Plan.
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Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
REFERENCES
Couturier, A. 1999. Conservation Priorities for the Birds of Southern Ontario. Bird Studies
Canada, Ministry of Natural Resources, Environment Canada. Port Rowan, Ontario.
Delcan 2009. Preliminary Geotechnical Report- Yonge Subway Extension Environmental
Assessment. Toronto, Ontario.
Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 2007a. Distribution of Fish Species at Risk. Toronto
Region Conservation Authority (Map 2). Produced on May 31, 2007. Online database
(http://www.conservationontario.ca/), accessed 28 October 2008.
Department of Fisheries and Oceans. 2007b. Reference Guide for Fish and Mussel Species at
Risk Distribution Maps. A Referral Review Tool for Projects Affecting Aquatic Species
at Risk. Conservation Authority Edition V. 1.0 2007.
Lee, H.T., W.D. Bakowsky, J.L. Riley, J. Bowles, M. Puddister, P. Uhlig and S. McMurray.
1998. Ecological Land Classification for Southern Ontario: First Approximation and Its
Application. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Southcentral Science Section, Science
Development and Transfer Branch. SCSS Field Guide FG-02.
LGL Limited. 2005. Natural Sciences Report. Yonge Street Transitway from Steeles
Avenue to 19th Avenue/Gamble Road. Individual Environmental Assessment. Prepared for the
York Rapid Transit Plan (YRTP).
Oldham, M.J. and W.F. Weller. 2000. Ontario Herpetofaunal Atlas. Natural Heritage Information
Centre,
Ontario
Ministry
of
Natural
Resources.
http://www.mnr.gov.on.ca/MNR/nhic/herps/ohs.html (updated 15-01-2001).
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. 2000. Significant Wildlife Habitat Technical Guide.
Peterborough, Ontario.
Natural Heritage Information Centre.
http://nhic.mnr.gov.on.ca/nhic_.cfm
2008.
Rare
Species
On-line
Database.
Regional Municipality of York. 1994. Official Plan Office Consolidation June 1, 2008. Includes
all approvals by the Minister of Municipal Affairs between October 17, 1994 and June 1, 2008.
Stanfield L. (Editor) 2005 (edited May 2007). Ontario Stream Assessment Protocol. Version 7,
Fish and Wildlife Branch. Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources. Peterborough, Ontario. 256
pages.
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Yonge Subway Extension
Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study
January 2009
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority. 2008. Background fisheries records (1949-2005)
Toronto and Region Conservation Authority. 2004. Table entitled TRCA Flora Scores & Ranks
(11 April 2003). Unpublished document provided by TRCA
Town of Markham. Markham Official Plan (Office Consolidation 2005). Markham, Ontario.
Varga, S., et al. 1999. The Vascular Plant Flora of the Greater Toronto Area (Rough Draft).
Ontario
Ministry
of
Natural
Resources,
Aurora,
ON.
82
pp.
Our File No.: 10-6959
Page 33
FIGURE 1
Existing Conditions
APPENDIX A
TRCA FISHERIES DATABASE FOR WATERCOURSES WITHIN THE GENERAL STUDY
AREA
APPENDIX A: TRCA FISHERIES DATABASE FOR WATERCOURSES WITHIN THE STUDY AREA AND VICINITY
Watercourse
Sampled
Species
Scientific Name
Common Name
Carassius auratus
Goldfish
Catostomus
commersoni
Clinostomus
elongatus
Status
Tributary #4 of
the East Don
River
Minor Tributaries
of the East Don
River
1984c
1984prs, 1985s,
1992t, 1997pt,
1998t, 2000t,
2002q, 2005pq
2002i, 2005hm
1949el, 1985l,
1995j, 2005n
1992t, 1997p,
2000t, 1985s
2005m
1984kl, 1985l,
1991k, 1992gk,
1995j, 1996a,
1997j, 1998ak,
2002gj, 2005gkln
1984p, 1997p,
1998r, 2002q,
2005pq
2002i, 2005m
1991a
1949el, 1982b,
1983b, 1984abfkl,
1985l, 1991aku,
1992egk,1995j,
1996a, 1997j,
1998ak, 2002j,
2003o, 2005gkln
White Sucker
Redside Dace
Pomona Mills
Creek
Main Branch of the
East Don River
S32, END3,
THR4,
SC/Sch.35
Cottus bairdi
Mottled Sculpin
Cottus sp.
Sculpin sp.
Culaea inconstans
Brook Stickleback
Etheostoma sp.
Darter sp.
2002gj
Etheostoma
caeruleum
Rainbow Darter
1949al
1991a
1984b, 1998ak,
2003o
1949cd, 1984c
1997p
2002i
Watercourse
Sampled
Species
Scientific Name
Common Name
Status
Main Branch of the
East Don River
Etheostoma
nigrum
Johnny Darter
1949ael, 1982b,
1983b, 1984abkl,
1985l, 1991aku,
1992egk, 1995j,
1996a, 1997j,
1998ak, 2005gkln
Hybognathus
hankinsoni
Brassy Minnow
1996a
Hypentelium
nigricans
Northern
Sucker
1983b
Hog
Lampetra appendix
American
Lamprey
Brook
Lepomis gibbosus
Pumpkinseed
Pomona Mills
Creek
Tributary #4 of
the East Don
River
Minor Tributaries
of the East Don
River
1984c
1984ps, 1985s,
1992t, 1997pt,
1998t, 2000t,
2002q, 2005pq
2005m
1983p
S32,
NONE3,
NONE4,
SC/Sch.35
2002q, 2005q
1984b, 2005n
1949aegl, 1983b,
1984bl,
1985l,1991k,
1992egk, 1997j
1984c
1997p
2005m
1984c
1983p, 1984ps,
1992t, 1997p,
1998t, 2000t,
2005p
2005m
Luxilus cornutus
Common Shiner
Micropterus
salmoides
Largemouth Bass
1997p
Cyprinidae
Unknown minnow
2005p
2005h
Oncorhynchus
Rainbow Trout
1997pt, 1998t
2002i, 2005m
2002j, 2005gkl
Watercourse
Sampled
Species
Scientific Name
Common Name
Status
Main Branch of the
East Don River
Pomona Mills
Creek
Tributary #4 of
the East Don
River
Minor Tributaries
of the East Don
River
mykiss
2005m
Perca flavescens
Yellow Perch
Phoxinus eos
Northern
Redbelly Dace
1949g, 1984b,
1992k
Pimephales
notatus
Bluntnose Minnow
2002j, 2005n
Pimephales
promelas
Rhinichthys
atratulus
Rhinichthys
cataractae
Fathead Minnow
1949ael, 1984b,
1991k, 1992gk,
1997j, 1998a,
2005n
Blacknose Dace
1949aegl, 1984abfkl,
1985l, 1991aku,
1992egk, 1995j,
1996a, 1997j,
1998ak, 2002gj,
2003o, 2005gkln
Longnose Dace
1949agl, 1982b,
1984afkl,1985l,
1991aku, 1992ek,
1995j, 1996a,
1997j, 1998ak,
2002gj, 2003o,
2005gkln
1984rs, 1985s,
1992t, 1998t,
2000t
1984c
cd
1949 , 1984
1984c
c
1998r, 2005p
2002i, 2005hm
1992t, 1997pt,
1998t, 2000t,
2002q, 2005q
2005hm
1949s, 1983p,
1984prs, 1985s,
1992t, 1997pt,
1998rt, 2000t,
2005p
2002i, 2005hm
1983p, 1984prs,
1992t, 1997pt,
1998rt, 2000t,
2005p
2002i, 2005hm
Watercourse
Sampled
Species
Scientific Name
Common Name
Salmo trutta
Brown Trout
Semotilus
atromaculatus
Creek Chub
Catostomidae
Unknown Sucker
Status
Tributary #4 of
the East Don
River
Minor Tributaries
of the East Don
River
2002j, 2005ln
1997p, 1998rt,
2005q
2002i, 2005m
1949aegl,1982b,
1983b, 1984abfkl,
1985l, 1991aku,
1992egk, 1995j,
1996a, 1997j,
1998ak, 2003o,
2005gkln
1949s, 1983p,
1984prs, 1985s,
1992t, 1997t,
1997p, 1998rt,
2000t, 2002q,
2005p
2005hm
Main Branch of the
East Don River
Table * Legend
1
Provincial Rank (SRank); S3=‘rare to uncommon’
2
Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada (COSEWIC); END= endangered
3
Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources; THR=threatened
4
Species at Risk Act (SARA)/Schedule; SC= Species of Special Concern/ Sch.3= Schedule 3
a
Don 17 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
b
Don 41 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
c
Don 227 in Pomona Mills Creek
d
Don 103 in Pomona Mills Creek
e
Don 151 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
f
Don 526 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
g
Don 152 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
h
Don 544 in a Minor Tributary of the East Don River
i
Don 86 in a Minor Tributary of the East Don River
Pomona Mills
Creek
1949cd, 1984c
2002q
j
Don 500 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
Don 22 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
l
Don 28 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
m
Don 183 in a Minor Tributary of the East Don River
n
Don EDS-3A in the Main Branch of the East Don River
o
Don 554 in the Main Branch of the East Don River
p
Don 39 in Tributary #4 of the East Don River
q
Don 228 in Tributary #4 of the East Don River
r
Don 509 in Tributary #4 of the East Don River
s
Don 40 in Tributary #4 of the East Don River
t
Don 179 in Tributary #4 of the East Don River
u
TRCA Station 3 (as indicated in LGL 2005), located downstream of the
Pomona Creek confluence on the East Don River (downstream of Bayview
Ave, south of Steeles Ave.) Note: This station is not mapped on Figure 1.
k
APPENDIX B
Working Vascular Plant Checklist
WORKING VASCULAR PLANT CHECKLIST
Scientific Name
+ Abies sp.
Acer negundo
Common Name
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
2
Fir sp.
3
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
Manitoba maple
X
X
X
X
X
X
* Acer platanoides
Norway maple
X
X
X
X
X
X
Acer saccharinum
Acer saccharum ssp.
saccharum
* Achillea millefolium ssp.
millefolium
Actaea rubra
silver maple
X
X
* Aesculus hippocastanum
horse-chestnut
* Agrostis gigantea
redtop
* Alliaria petiolata
garlic mustard
* Alopecurus pratensis
meadow foxtail
C3
red baneberry
X
X
X
serviceberry
X
Arabis glabra
tower mustard
Aralia nudicaulis
wild sarsaparilla
+*Ambrosia artemisiifolia
Asclepias syriaca
Annual Ragweed
common milkweed
Aster ericoides
Aster lanceolatus ssp.
lanceolatus
heath aster
+ Aster novae-angliae
Bidens frondosa
New England Aster
common beggar-ticks
Bidens tripartita
X
X
+
X
X
R1,2, C3
X
X
X
X
C3
X
+
X
X
X
+
+
X
+
+
+
+
+
X
X
+
X
eastern lined aster
swamp tickseed
X
X
common ragweed
jack-in-the-pulpit
+
X
Amelanchier spp.
common burdock
X
X
X
Ambrosia artemisiifolia
* Arctium minus
Arisaema triphyllum ssp.
triphyllum
X
X
yarrow
great burdock
15
X
sugar maple
* Arctium lappa
14
+
+
+
X
X
+
+
X
U1
X
Scientific Name
Common Name
* Bromus inermis ssp. inermis
smooth brome
* Bromus tectorum
downy brome
* Campanula rapunculoides
European bellflower
Carex cf. laxiflora
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
2
X
+
U1,2
+ Celtis occidentalis
* Centaurea maculosa
Common Hackberry
spotted knapweed
R1
* Chelidonium majus
celandine
X
* Chenopodium album
lamb's quarters
X
* Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
ox-eye daisy
* Cichorium intybus
chickory
Cicuta maculata
Circaea lutetiana ssp.
canadensis
* Cirsium arvense
spotted water hemlock
X
X
X
X
X
X
15
X
X
X
X
+
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
U2
X
X
+
Canada thistle
X
X
* Convallaria majalis
lily-of-the-valley
X
* Convolvulus arvensis
field bindweed
X
+
+
X
+
+
X
horseweed
X
Crown-vetch
alternate-leaved dogwood
X
Cornus rugosa
round-leaved dogwood
X
Cornus stolonifera
red-osier dogwood
X
* Cynanchum nigrum
dog strangling vine
X
+*Dactylis glomerata
* Daucus carota
* Dipsacus fullonum ssp.
sylvestris
Echinocystis lobata
Orchard Grass
wild carrot
* Echium vulgare
viper's bugloss
+* Elaeagnus angustifolia
Russian Olive
+
+
+
+
+
+
X
+
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
common teasel
wild cucumber
14
X
enchanter's-nightshade
+*Coronilla varia
Cornus alternifolia
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
+
beech wood sedge
Conyza canadensis
3
X
X
X
+
+
+
Scientific Name
Eleocharis compressa
* Elymus repens
Elymus virginicus
* Epilobium parviflorum
Common Name
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
2
3
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
flattened spike rush
X
U2
field horsetail
Erigeron annuus
annual fleabane
Erigeron philadelphicus
marsh fleabane
X
X
X
X
X
willow-herb
Equisetum arvense
X
+
X
X
X
* Erysimum cheiranthoides
wormseed mustard
X
+* Euonymus europaea
Eupatorium maculatum
European Spindle-tree
joe-pye weed
+
* Festuca rubra ssp. rubra
red fescue
X
X
X
X
X
Fragaria virginiana
wild strawberry
X
Fraxinus americana
white ash
X
Fraxinus pennsylvanica
green/red ash
+
+
Yellow Bedstraw
yellow avens
* Geum urbanum
urban avens
X
X
* Glechoma hederacea
ground ivy
X
+
X
beggar's lice
U1, R2
+ Hamamelis virginiana
American Witch-hazel
U2, C3
+*Hedera helix
English Ivy
+*Helianthus tuberosus
Jerusalem Artichoke
+*Hemerocallis sp.
* Hesperis matronalis
Daylily sp.
dame's rocket
* Hieracium piloselloides
glaucous king-devil
* Hypericum perforatum
X
X
+*Galium verum
Geum aleppicum
Hackelia virginiana
15
X
quack grass
Virginia wild-rye
14
+
X
+
X
+
+
+
+
+
X
+
+
X
X
common st. john's-wort
X
Impatiens capensis
spotted touch-me-not
Juglans nigra
black walnut
R2
X
+
X
X
X
+
X
+
X
X
X
X
Scientific Name
Common Name
Juncus torreyi
torrey’s rush
Juniperus communis
common juniper
Juniperus virginiana
red cedar
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
U1,2
X
* Lolium perenne
perennial rye grass
X
* Lonicera tatarica
Tartarian honeysuckle
X
* Lotus corniculatus
birdsfoot trefoil
+ Lysimachia ciliata
* Lysimachia nummularia
Fringed Loosestrife
moneywort
+
+
+
* Lythrum salicaria
purple loosestrife
Apple sp.
* Matricaria matricarioides
pineapple-weed
Matteuccia struthiopteris
14
15
X
Common Motherwort
butter-and-eggs
+*Malus sp.
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
R1,2, C3
prickly lettuce
starry false solomon's seal
3
X
* Lactuca serriola
+*Leonurus cardiaca ssp
cardiaca
* Linaria vulgaris
Maianthemum stellatum
2
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
X
X
+
+
X
+
+
+
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
+
X
ostrich fern
X
* Medicago lupulina
black medick
X
* Melilotus alba
white sweet clover
* Melilotus officinalis
yellow sweet clover
* Morus alba
white mulberry
* Nasturtium microphyllum
watercress
+
+
* Nepeta cataria
catnip
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
X
X
+
+
Oenothera biennis
common evening primrose
Oxalis stricta
yellow wood-sorrel
X
Parthenocissus inserta
thicket creeper
X
X
Phalaris arundinacea
reed canary grass
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
* Phleum pratense
timothy
X
X
Scientific Name
+ Phragmites australis
* Picea abies
Picea glauca
+*Pinus nigra
Pinus resinosa
Common Name
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Common Reed
Norway spruce
white spruce
Black Pine
red pine
+ Pinus strobus
* Pinus sylvestris
Eastern White Pine
Scots pine
* Plantago major
common plantain
* Poa annua
annual bluegrass
Legal
Status
1
2
3
+
+
X
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
14
15
+
X
C3
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
C3
X
C3
+
X
+
X
X
Poa compressa
Canada bluegrass
X
X
X
X
X
X
Poa pratensis ssp. pratensis
Kentucky bluegrass
X
X
X
X
X
X
Japanese Knotweed
black bindweed
X
+*Polygonum cuspidatum
* Polygonum convolvulus
Polygonum lapathifolium
nodding smartweed
Populus tremuloides
trembling aspen
* Potentilla recta
Prunella vulgaris ssp.
lanceolata
Prunus virginiana ssp.
virginiana
* Puccinellia distans
rough-fruited cinquefoil
+ Quercus macrocarpa
Quercus rubra
Bur Oak
red oak
* Ranunculus acris
common buttercup
* Rhamnus cathartica
common buckthorn
+* Rumex crispus
Curly Dock
+ Rhus aromatica
Rhus radicans ssp. rydbergii
Fragrant Sumac
poison ivy
Rhus typhina
+
X
+
X
X
heal-all
X
choke cherry
X
+
X
alkali grass
staghorn sumac
X
X
X
X
+
C3
C3
X
+
X
+
+
R1,2
X
X
+
X
+
+
X
+
X
+
X
X
+
Scientific Name
Common Name
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
2
3
* Ribes rubrum
red currant
* Robinia pseudo-acacia
black locust
* Rosa multiflora
Rubus idaeus ssp.
melanolasius
multiflora rose
wild red raspberry
X
X
+ Rubus occidentalis
* Rumex crispus
Black Raspberry
curled dock
+
+
X
* Salix alba
white willow
X
* Salix x rubens
crack willow
X
* Salix X sepulcralis
+ Sambucus racemosa ssp
pubens
* Saponaria officinalis
weeping willow
X
Red-berried Elder
bouncing bet
+
* Solanum dulcamara
bittersweet nightshade
X
X
Solidago altissima
tall goldenrod
X
X
Solidago canadensis
Canada goldenrod
X
X
+ Solidago gigantea
Smooth Goldenrod
+ Solidago flexicaulis
Solidago nemoralis
Broad-leaved Goldenrod
old-field goldenrod
+
x
* Sorbus aucuparia
* Symphytum officinale ssp.
officinale
European mountain-ash
common comfrey
X
+*Syringa vulgaris
* Tanacetum vulgare
Common Lilac
garden tansy
+
* Taraxacum officinale
common dandelion
X
Thuja occidentalis
eastern white cedar
X
+*Tilia cordata
* Tragopogon dubius
Small leaf Linden
goat's beard
X
* Trifolium pratense
red clover
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
14
15
X
X
X
+
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
X
+
X
+
+
X
X
+
+
X
X
X
X
X
+
X
X
X
+
X
X
X
+
X
+
X
+
X
X
+
X
X
X
X
X
X
Scientific Name
Common Name
* Trifolium repens
white clover
* Tussilago farfara
coltsfoot
Typha angustifolia
narrow-leaved cattail
Typha latifolia
common cattail
Ulmus americana
COSEWIC
MNR
Local
Legal
Status
1
2
X
+
+
white elm
X
X
Siberian elm
X
+
+ Ulmus rubra
Slippery Elm
+* Urtica dioica ssp dioica
* Verbascum thapsus
Stinging Nettle
common mullein
blue vervain
Verbena urticifolia
white vervain
+* Viburnum lantana
X
Violet sp.
* Vinca minor
periwinkle
X
riverbank grape
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
X
+
X
+
+
+
X
X
+
X
+
+
X
X
X
X
+
X
TABLE 5 LEGEND
1 – Greater Toronto Area
2 – Region of York
3 – Toronto and Region Conservation Authority
X
X
+
This table is based on a report by LGL(2005), and has been updated by Ecoplans.
Local:
U – Uncommon
R – Rare
C – Species of Concern (L1-L4)
+
15
X
+
+
+ Viola sp.
*Introduced species
+Additional species observed by Ecoplans Limited in Oct 2008
COSEWIC – Committee on the Status of Endangered Wildlife in Canada:
END – Endangered
THR – Threatened
SC – Special Concern
14
X
+
* Vicia cracca
Vitis riparia
X
+
U2, C3
Wayfaring-tree
European highbush
cranberry
bird vetch
* Viburnum opulus
Reference Location
4
5
12
13
X
* Ulmus pumila
Verbena hastata
3
OMNR – Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources:
END – Endangered
THR – Threatened
VUL – Vulnerable
Legal Status:
SARA – Species at Risk Act
ESA – Endangered Species Act
+
X
X
APPENDIX C
Representative Photos from the Yonge Street Subway Extension Study Area
Download

Natural Environment Report Yonge Subway Extension Conceptual Design and Functional Planning Study