seniors program
& Opera Studies Program
January and March 2010
January–
A p r i l 2009
www.sfu.ca/seniors
Courses at Harbour Centre
in downtown Vancouver
Courses at Harbour Centre in downtown Vancouver
www.sfu.ca/seniors
>
2
c e l e b r at i n g s p r i n g 2 0 1 0
I’d like to send out a very special
thank you to the many who
responded to our donation flyer
in September. As a result of your
generous support, we have been
able to expand our course offerings
this term. Our busy spring
schedule includes two new free
forum events, a special opera gala
program, and the launch of two
new Outreach Projects — more
information on these new DVDs will be announced shortly.
In the New s
Archives of the Seniors
Program featured in different
media are collected here:
www.sfu.ca/seniors/news.htm
Meanwhile, our 35th Anniversary event in September has
sparked something new to celebrate: this Fall, we broke all of our
enrollment records — we accepted over 1,260 registrations, up
from 754 last fall.
This Spring presents some new challenges, however, as Harbour
Centre will be unavailable for room bookings between January
28 and March 4. As a result, we are offering a special series of
4-session classes in the January pre-Olympic month, followed by
another series of 4-session classes in the post-Olympic month
of March. Have no fear, though, our high-quality programming
remains. Our instructors have redesigned their courses to fit this
unusual schedule — but with a twist. All courses will be extended
to 2½ hours from the regular 2 hours, to help compensate for the
shorter semester.
Only two people handle the entire Seniors Program operation. I
want to publicly thank Julian Benedict, our Coordinator, for his
willingness to spend countless extra hours to make sure that all
runs smoothly. This has been and is a delightful collaboration that
I hope will continue for years to come.
Warmest regards to all,
Alan David Aberbach, Director
S chol ar s C or ner
Want to know more about
learning in later life? Visit our
new Scholars Corner webpage,
where you can read articles from
around the world detailing the
many benefits of lifelong learning:
www.sfu.ca/seniors/corner.htm
Prominent figures on the cover
From left to right, top to bottom
(page number of related course):
• Sir John A. MacDonald (p. 6)
• Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (p. 4)
• Jesus of Nazareth (p. 4)
• Virginia Woolf (p. 12)
• Chairman Mao Zedong
(p. 13)
• Ella Fitzgerald (p. 16)
• Charles Darwin (p. 10)
• Joseph-Maurice Ravel
(p. 4)
• Elektra (p. 10)
>
Registration begins
Sch e d u l e at a g l a n c e
at 10 am on Monday,
November 16, 2009
JANUARY COURSES
Mondays
9–11:20 am The Life and
Times of Jesus of
Nazareth
Tuesdays
Wednesdays
Hot Topics:
The Activist
Reading the Media Poetry and Politics
of the Vancouver 8
11:30 am
Music Drama
–1:50 pm after Wagner: The
Operas of Debussy
and Ravel
2–4:20 pm History of Western
Political Thought
Important
Economic Policy
Issues Facing
Canadians
Today
Selected Topics
in Classical Jewish
Thought
‘Working Images’:
An Introduction
to Visual
Anthropology
Remarkable
Prime Ministers:
King, Macdonald,
Trudeau and
Laurier
Thursday
The Fairness Factor:
How Responses to
Unfairness Shape
Our Worlds
Revealers and
Revelations: A
Closer Look at Six
Pivotal Religious
Figures
Eastern Wisdom
for Modern Life:
Confucius
Fridays
A Crash Course
on Jazz
3
Worshipping
in the Land of
Olympus: Greek
Sanctuaries
The Art of Political
Doublespeak
January 23, 1–2:30 pm
Free Forum: Your Money, Your Future: “4 Piles of Money”
January 23, 9:30 am–12 noon
Opera Event: Herbert von Karajan and the Art of The Opera Conductor
MARCH COURSES
Mondays
9–11:20 am Petrarch and His
World: The Story
of “The Father of
Humanism”
11:30 am
Charles Darwin:
–1:50 pm His Life and Ideas
2–4:20 pm The Fascinating
World of Geoffrey
Chaucer and The
Canterbury
Tales
Tuesdays
The Woman as
Hero in Western
Literature
National Opera:
The Story of Its
19th Century
Revitalization
Biblical Figures in
the Qur’an
Wednesdays
Glorious Excess:
The Agony and
Ecstasy in British
Romantic
Poets
Power and Politics:
George Orwell’s
Epic 1984
Revisited
The History and
Future of Money
— A New Twist
Thursday
Ezra Pound:
Idealist to Outlaw
Fridays
Canada-China
Relations From
Mao to Now
Great English
Novelists
Music and
Meaning
March 13, 1–3:30 pm
Opera Event: What Would Opera be without Murder?
March 20, 1–2:30 pm
Free Forum: Understanding the Roots of the Arab-Israel Conflict
>
4
January courses
THE LIFE AND TIMES OF JESUS OF NAZARETH
4 Mondays, 9:00–11:20, January 4–25
SCFC 506 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Who was Jesus? Was he a wandering teacher? A
rabbi? A political revolutionary? Social reformer? Faith
healer? Magician? Mystic? Eschatological prophet?
Hillelite? Cynic? Essene? To determine which of these
descriptions may be most fitting, we will examine Jesus
in his historical and literary contexts, including Second
Temple Judaism, Hellenistic culture, Roman society
and politics, the canonical gospels, and other earlier
and contemporary sources. Join us for an intriguing
exploration of this historical figure.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc506.htm
Marlene LeGates taught History and Women’s Studies at
Capilano University and is now working on a book on the
history of Christianity.
MUSIC DRAMA AFTER WAGNER: THE OPERAS OF
DEBUSSY AND RAVEL
4 Mondays, 11:30–1:50, January 4–25
SCFC 507 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Claude Debussy (1862–1918) was a central figure in
European music during the transition from nineteenth
century romanticism to twentieth century modernism.
His only completed opera, Pelleas et Melisande,
presents a novel and individual approach to the fusion
of drama and music. Based on the symbolist play by
Maurice Maeterlinck, Pelleas employs a natural, speechlike declamation and delicate, subtle orchestration
which one musicologist has described as “an iridescent
veil covering the text.” Besides providing a detailed
analysis of Debussy’s masterpiece, this course will
consider the wider problem of French opera composers
coming to terms with the awesome influence
of German music drama. Our survey of significant
operas by Debussy’s contemporaries will include a
detailed discussion of the brilliant one-act comic opera
L’Heure Espagnole by Maurice Ravel (1875–1937).
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc507.htm
Nicolas Krusek is a professional musician and conductor.
HISTORY OF WESTERN POLITICAL THOUGHT
4 Mondays, 2:00–4:20, January 4–25
SCFC 508 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
The course will offer an introduction to the most
influential thinkers in the history of Western political
thought, including Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke,
Rousseau, Marx, Mill, Weber and Nietzsche. Through
an exploration of the key ideas, assumptions, hopes,
dreams and fears that have animated Western
political thought, the course will help shed light on
contemporary political debates and thinking. What
should a good society look like? To what end(s) should
it be directed? What is the nature and meaning of
freedom and equality? These and other questions will
be explored through the eyes of some of the greatest
thinkers in the Western canon.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc508.htm
Daniel Drugge is a PhD student in the department of
political science at UBC.
HOT TOPICS: READING THE MEDIA
4 Tuesdays, 9:00–11:20, January 5–26
SCFC 509 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
This course will provide a forum for well-informed
discussion on a variety of breaking news stories. The
weekly discussions will parallel the themes indicated
below (or other themes to be determined by
participants’ interests); the specific stories or events
that we will be reading about and discussing will be
decided on a week-to-week basis, reflecting the interests
of participants and emerging news. After a short
lecture by the instructor on an area of interest relating
to the week’s chosen event, students will exchange
observations and criticisms of the media coverage for
that event. Critical reading of the media, including an
awareness of alternatives to mainstream media sources,
will be a priority.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc509.htm
Lealle Ruhl teaches Political Science at Langara College.
Full course descriptions at www.sfu.ca/seniors
>
January courses
IMPORTANT ECONOMIC POLICY ISSUES FACING
CANADIANS TODAY
4 Tuesdays, 11:30–1:50, January 5–26
SCFC 510 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
In this course, three main economic topics will be
discussed. First, the effect of mass immigration on
Canadian living standards. Second, a proposal for the
creation of a North American Monetary Union and
the Amero (a proposed North American currency
which would replace the Canadian dollar, American
dollar, and the Mexican peso). Third, we will consider an
explanation of the unexpected costs of social programs.
Other topics for discussion will include the causes of,
and remedies for, the current economic crisis, free trade
issues, agricultural supply management, and taxation
issues.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc510.htm
Herbert G. Grubel is Professor of Economics (Emeritus) at
Simon Fraser University and a Senior Fellow at the Fraser
Institute in Vancouver, BC, Canada.
SELECTED TOPICS IN CLASSICAL JEWISH THOUGHT
4 Tuesdays, 2:00–4:20, January 5–26
SCFC 511 | Room 1800 | Fee: $83 (includes photocopy
fee)
Do join us for a fascinating introductory tour de force
through 3800 years of one of the world’s oldest religions.
Along the way we will take an historical and practical
overview of the written Torah as well as the oral
tradition in Judaism. What are the 6 biblical injunctions
that are never to be forgotten? Other topics will include:
creation ex nihilo; models of centre and asymmetry; the
architecture of Eden; exile; redemption and return; the
image of God; personal and cosmic space; a people on
the edge; and a minority among the nations.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc511.htm
Rabbi Yosef Wosk is Director of Interdisciplinary Studies at
SFU and founder of the Philosophers’ Cafés.
RetiRement Living inspiRed
by
you.
As a developer of distinguished retirement residences for active,
independent seniors, Pacific Arbour gives back to the communities in which we build.
That’s why we are pleased to support the SFU Seniors Program,
which provides opportunities for lifelong learning.
7230 Acorn Avenue, Burnaby
604.526.2248
www.themulberry.ca
604.408.5811 • www.pacificarbour.ca
135 West 15 St., North Vancouver
604.980.6525
www.thesummerhill.ca
Where good things come together.
5
>
6
January courses
THE ACTIVIST POETRY AND POLITICS OF THE
VANCOUVER 8
4 Wednesdays, 9:00–11:20, January 6–27
SCFC 512 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
How has underground poetry influenced the evolution
of Vancouver’s history? Poets such as Earle Birney,
Phyliss Webb, Maxine Gadd, bill bissett, Jeff Derksen,
Deanna Ferguson, Roger Farr and The Sybils (Rita
Wong and Larissa Lai) are part of a continuum of
exciting voices who practice a political poetry rooted
in place—Vancouver—but engaging an international
scope. Radical critiques of capital are the bedrock of
their praxis. We will look at a representative work of
each writer and through close reading and ancillary
critical and poetic works place them in a historical and
political context that illuminates the poets, their city
and the times.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc512.htm
Michael Barnholden is a writer, editor and publisher.
‘WORKING IMAGES’ : AN INTRODUCTION TO
VISUAL ANTHROPOLOGY
4 Wednesdays, 11:30–1:50, January 6–27
SCFC 513 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
Anthropologists and many other academics have long
argued that culture is learned in practice. In other words,
we all learn what is expected, included, and excluded, as
socially acceptable, and even possible, by being active in
the world. By observing others, and by reflecting on the
social norms in society and in our institutions, we can
better understand our world.
We will consider this phenomenon by analyzing texts,
film, video, photography, drawing, painting and sketches.
Photo: Elena Ouliankina
We will also examine the promise and pitfalls of these
new approaches. Through lectures based on case
studies, film, short readings, and some in-class activities,
we will explore and better understand ‘working images.’
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc513.htm
Adrienne L. Burk is a Senior Lecturer in the SFU
Department of Sociology and Anthropology.
REMARKABLE PRIME MINISTERS: KING,
MACDONALD, TRUDEAU AND LAURIER
4 Wednesdays, 2:00–4:20, January 6–27
SCFC 514 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
William Lyon Mackenzie King was Canada’s longest
serving prime minister, followed by John A. Macdonald,
Pierre Trudeau and Wilfrid Laurier. Altogether, they
held the reins of government for 72 of the 142 years
that have passed since the creation of the modern state
of Canada. These four individuals were undoubtedly
crucial in the shaping of the country and its character.
What mark have they left? As personalities, what were
they famous for? In their private lives, what kind of men
were they? In this course we will be discussing these and
other questions.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc514.htm
Hugh Johnston is Professor Emeritus, Department of
History, SFU.
Are you on our email list?
Visit www.sfu.ca/seniors to sign up!
>
January courses
THE FAIRNESS FACTOR: HOW RESPONSES TO
UNFAIRNESS SHAPE OUR WORLDS
4 Thursdays, 9:00–11:20, January 7–28
SCFC 515 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
We are born into social worlds characterized by the
unequal distribution of authority, power and influence,
and for as long as we can remember, we have been
quick to judge whether fairness has prevailed. Is this
“fairness sensitivity” genetically programmed, or does
it arise through direct social experience? How has this
concern for fairness fueled the development of laws
and institutions in Canada and abroad? In this class, we
will explore these and related questions by drawing
upon our own experiences along with observations
from the biological and social sciences. We will also
examine actual cases that highlight the diversity of
opinion that can arise in assessing fairness and the
challenges of responding to unfairness constructively.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc515.htm
Bergen Amren is a Dialogue Associate of SFU’s Centre for
Dialogue, and an independent dialogue facilitator and
fairness consultant.
REVEALERS AND REVELATIONS: A CLOSER LOOK AT
SIX PIVOTAL RELIGIOUS FIGURES
4 Thursdays, 11:30–1:50, January 7–28
SCFC 516 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
In this course we take a fresh look at the founders of six
world religions, the status of their messages, and their
impact on global history. How are “revealers” similar to
and different from visionaries, mystics, reformers and
minor prophets? What is the nature of revelation and
is there a rationale for giving it any credence? What
spiritual and institutional guidance was offered by
Moses and Jesus, Krishna and Buddha, Muhammad
and Baha’u’llah? In what ways do their teachings appear
to be linked to each other and progress across the ages?
Despite the cultural particularities of their traditions,
do they share any abiding universal verities?
1 – Re-discovering Revelation Despite Post-Modernism
2 – Moses & Jesus as Revealers
3 – Krishna & Buddha as Revealers
4 – Muhammad & Bahaullah as Revealers
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc516.htm
Harold Rosen, a long time student of religion, is working on
a book entitled World Religions and Global Civilization.
EASTERN WISDOM FOR MODERN LIFE: CONFUCIUS
4 Thursdays, 2:00–4:20, January 7–28
SCFC 535 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
Confucius (551–479 BCE) was one of the most
important early Chinese scholars of his era, and
through his writings he continues to have a
tremendous impact on Chinese traditions and its
societal evolution. The Analects, a work compiled by
several of his disciples, will help guide us through this
journey. In this course, we will examine Confucian
values, including filial piety, honesty, humanity, loyalty
and righteousness while also considering his focus on
education. Through this course, we will also consider
how his teachings can help us better understand our
complex world today.
Recommended text available at Chapters: The Analects,
Lau, D.C.(1979) Confucius, Penguin Classics
Christine Wong is an education consultant and
independent scholar. She teaches Cantonese at Simon
Fraser University, Continuing Studies.
A CRASH COURSE ON JAZZ: BIG BANDS,
INSTRUMENTALISTS, BE-BOP, COOL SCHOOL,
AND GREAT VOCALISTS
4 Fridays, 9:00–11:20, January 8–29
SCFC 517 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Through this course, you will better understand jazz
and its important place in music history. Meet some
of the jazz icons and the social times that propelled
this enduring and creative music. These four sessions
will feature insightful musical profiles, the politics and
economics of the times and their unforgettable music.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc517.htm
Neil Ritchie, former CBC radio producer, will draw from
his vast library of videos and CDs for an entertaining and
enlightening look at jazz.
Register online at
www.sfu.ca/seniors
7
>
8
January courses
WORSHIPPING IN THE LAND OF OLYMPUS:
THE ART OF POLITICAL DOUBLESPEAK
GREEK SANCTUARIES
4 Fridays, 2:00–4:20, January 8–29
4 Fridays, 11:30–1:50, January 8–29
SCFC 519 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
SCFC 518 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
This course will define and look at the use of
Did you know the Parthenon in Athens was not a centre “doublespeak” in the political setting. We will examine
of worship? Ancient Greek religion intertwined through
the attitudes, agendas, behaviours and consequences of
all aspects of everyday life, but it was the sanctuary that
politicians and their aides in the deliberate, calculated
was the focal point. And despite being one of the most
misuse of language. We will also engage and explore the
well-known symbols of Greece, a temple alone did not a defining attributes of “doublespeak” and the effects it
sanctuary make. So what exactly did define a sanctuary
has had on our society. How does it influence us — has
and how did it function within society? We will explore
it made us more cynical about politics? Through this
an array of sanctuaries throughout the ancient Greek
course we will better understand the nature of modern
world, look at the varied roles they played, such as
politics and its effect on all of us.
centres of healing or elements of political propaganda,
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc519.htm
and use them to further understand ancient Greek
Matthew MacLeod is a lecturer in political and medical
culture. Lectures will be illustrated with appropriate
communication.
images.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc518.htm
Jennifer Knapp is a PhD candidate specializing in Greek and
Visit www.sfu.ca/seniors to sign up!
Roman Archaeology.
Are you on our email list?
Terraces on 7th
At Terraces on 7th,
it’s all about you!
Remember the things you wanted to
do more often when you were racing
the clock? Here, you can do them
at your leisure. We cook, clean, and
change the light bulbs. You entertain
family and friends, workout, e-mail,
volunteer - or take a class or two. You
do whatever you like.
At Terraces on 7th, you can have six
days of Saturdays. You can count on
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For more information, call 604.738.8380
1570 West 7th Avenue Vancouver, BC V6J 5M1
(next door to Seymour Medical Clinic)
www.retirementconcepts.com
>
o u r 3 5 t h y e a r c e l e b r at i o n
9
Photo: Asterios Moutsokapas
On Saturday September 12,
over 200 senior students, instructors, faculty and
other dignitaries attended our special 35th anniversary
celebration. The event was hosted by the Seniors
Program Director, Alan Aberbach, and featured a series
of speeches and presentations by special guests, including
the first Dean of Continuing Studies, Jack Blaney, the
Executive Director of SFU Harbour Centre, Ann Cowan,
the Vice President Academic of SFU, Jon Driver, the
current Dean of Continuing Studies, Tom Nesbit, and the
Seniors Program Coordinator, Julian Benedict.
The keynote speaker for the event was the Honourable
Minister for Healthy Living and Sport, Ida Chong —
whose portfolio also includes promoting the health
needs of older adults through the Senior Secretariat.
She outlined her Ministry’s work investing in programs
and services that promote age-friendly communities for
older adults, physical fitness programs, volunteerism,
and efforts aimed at combating ageism in the workplace.
Minister Chong not only emphasized the importance
of lifelong learning, which is linked with many health
benefits, but indicated a desire to establish a relationship
with the SFU Seniors Program.
The event featured a detailed PowerPoint presentation
outlining the history of the Seniors Program, including
details of our ambitious expansion plan for the future.
These include offering even more non-credit courses
in future terms, as well as our plans to launch two
new Outreach DVDs in the 2009/2010 year — one
exploring age-friendly communities, and one examining
the evolution of the brain. The event also featured an
abridged presentation of the program’s latest Outreach
DVD: Democracy, the Intent and the Reality.
The event closed with a special anniversary triple-layer
carrot cake and coffee service — which was clearly
enjoyed by all in attendance!
The Seniors Program would like to thank everyone who
attended the event, and we look forward to many more
years of successful adult programming.
>
10
m a r ch c o u r s e s
PETRARCH AND HIS WORLD: THE STORY OF
“THE FATHER OF HUMANISM”
4 Mondays, 9:00–11:20, March 8–29
SCFC 520 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
The 21st century reader mostly knows Petrarch
(1304–74) for his poems celebrating his unrequited
love of Laura, a married woman who many believe
was a figment of the poet’s imagination. However, his
contemporaries admired Petrarch mostly as a scholar
of antiquity, a book collector and a creator of the first
public library. But Petrarch was also the father of
Humanism, a traveler, a mountain climber, a man of
insatiable intellectual curiosity with caustic opinions
on everything: from politics to music to medicine
to gardening. What fascinates us today is that we
recognize in Petrarch the man of almost modern
sensibilities: a soul torn by contradictory desires, selfdoubt and restlessness. In this course we will look at
the great poet in the context of his time and the world
so different from ours and his struggles so uncannily
modern.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc520.htm
Marina Sonkina, former professor of Russian literature at
Moscow State University, was also a CBC broadcaster and
producer.
CHARLES DARWIN: HIS LIFE AND IDEAS
4 Mondays, 11:30–1:50, March 8–29
SCFC 521 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
2009 was a major anniversary year for Charles Darwin.
It was both the bicentenary of his birth and the 150th
anniversary of his famous Origin of Species. This course
will begin with a look at some of the ideas that Darwin
drew on for his own work. In the second week we will
discuss his life and times. We will then discuss the
theory of evolution and natural selection as Darwin
developed it, and finally we will look at some of the
consequences his ideas have had for the way modern
society perceives our world.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc521.htm
Hannah Gay is a historian of science.
THE FASCINATING WORLD OF GEOFFREY CHAUCER
AND THE CANTERBURY TALES
4 Mondays, 2:00–4:20, March 8–29
SCFC 522 | Room 1800 | Fee: $83 (includes photocopy
fee)
The world we find in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Canterbury
Tales is complex, disorderly, misogynistic, violent and
humourous. Chaucer’s portrayals of his various pilgrims
are deliberately subversive reflections of his society;
each pilgrim who tells a tale tells his/her own personal
story. We will study six of the tales, learning to read
them in informed critical voices — voices which reflect
Chaucer’s medieval world and capture the complex
world of this text. Hopefully, we will learn to laugh with
this author who, in portraying himself as a naive, rotund,
little man, has delighted and charmed readers with his
sophistication, his humour and his humanity. We will
read the texts in Modern English but follow them in
Middle English in class, learning to ‘know’ the medieval
culture from which he wrote.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc522.htm
Sheila Roberts, a retired member of SFU’s English
Department, is the recipient of SFU’s Excellence in
Teaching Award.
THE WOMAN AS HERO IN WESTERN LITERATURE
4 Tuesdays, 9:00–11:20, March 9–30
SCFC 523 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Throughout the western literary tradition, women
have frequently been presented as strong, self-reliant
iconoclasts. This course will examine how writers have
utilized the strong woman protagonist to critique and
evaluate the consequences of the disenfranchisement
of women in western society. To this end, we will
examine how strong women are depicted in the Bible
(Deborah, Ruth, Esther); in Greek drama (Medea, Elektra,
Antigone), opera (Carmen, Salome) and in modern
drama (Racine’s Phedre, Ibsen’s Hedda Gabler and Nora
Helmer, Shaw’s Eliza Doolittle).
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc523.htm
Graham Forst taught English and Philosophy at Capilano
University.
Register online at www.sfu.ca/seniors
>
m a r ch c o u r s e s
NATIONAL OPERA: THE STORY OF ITS 19TH
CENTURY REVITALIZATION
4 Tuesdays, 11:30–1:50, March 9–30
SCFC 524 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
With the advent of nationalism in 19th century, the
hegemony of Italian and French opera across Europe
was broken: different countries (or aspiring countries)
forged their own styles, conscripting opera into their
projects of self-definition and self-determination. For
their part, the Italians, who unlike the French were
not yet a unified country, used opera to help create
a national identify suitable for the hoped-for state of
Italy. The result was a Europe-wide revitalization of
opera and the introduction of new and wonderful
musical and dramatic idioms to the art form.
In this course we will focus on one example of Italian
opera (Vincenzo Bellini’s Norma); of German (Carl
Maria Von Weber’s Der Freischütz); of Czech (Dvořák’s
Rusalka); and of Russian (Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov).
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc524.htm
Harvey de Roo is Professor Emeritus, SFU Department of
English
BIBLICAL FIGURES IN THE QUR’AN
4 Tuesdays, 2:00–4:20, March 9–30
SCFC 525 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
According to Muslim parlance, Jews and Christians are
described as “People of the Book”, in that, like Muslims,
they are seen as recipients of Scriptures revealed by
God. It is not surprising, therefore, to find in the Qur’an
narratives or simple references to Biblical figures. The
very essence of Islam emerges from a brief narrative
about Abraham responding to God’s inexplicable
command to sacrifice his son. Brief as these references
tend to be, they aroused in Muslim piety a great
deal of interest. Muslim scholars elaborated the
details in what is known as “Stories of the Prophets.”
Sufis (mystics) and others used them for devotional
purposes. We will look at some of these figures and the
literature surrounding them.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc525.htm
Hanna Kassis is Professor Emeritus of Near Eastern and
Islamic Studies at UBC.
GLORIOUS EXCESS: THE AGONY AND ECSTASY IN
BRITISH ROMANTIC POETS FROM BLAKE TO KEATS
4 Wednesdays, 9:00–11:20, March 10–31
SCFC 526 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
Of all the literary movements, perhaps none continues
to be so influential today as the Romantic movement.
Not just our literature but also our self-perception
and expectations of life have been profoundly shaped
by the British Romantics. From science fiction to
detective novels, from Hollywood to politics, these
writers have scripted much of our worldview.
Therefore, if you thought the Romantic movement
was just about love, come discover the profound
visions of William Blake, William Wordsworth, Samuel
Taylor Coleridge, George Gordon Lord Byron, Percy
Bysshe Shelley, and John Keats. Enjoy some of the most
beautiful, sensual poetry ever written as we explore
the Romantic concerns still troubling us in the 21st
Century.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc526.htm
David Scherzer specializes in myth, non-realistic fiction
and romantic literature.
Feed your mind and soul! Vibrant
community conversations on burning
issues of the day, in neighbourhoods
throughout the Lower Mainland. See
www.philosopherscafe.net for dates
and details or phone 778-782-5215 to
request a schedule of events.
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12
m a r ch c o u r s e s
POWER AND POLITICS: GEORGE ORWELL’S
EPIC 1984 REVISITED
4 Wednesdays, 11:30–1:50, March 10–31
SCFC 527 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
This course will focus on Orwell’s dystopian novel
1984, not only for its literary merit, but also for its
many insights into the dangers and perversions of
totalitarianism. First published in 1949, the novel still
provokes a lot of interest and discussion in light of what
has taken place particularly in the field of technology
and its effect on the rights and freedoms of the
individual. Throughout the course we will examine the
novel’s concepts such as big brother, doublethink and
newspeak and their relation and effects on those of us
living in the 21st. The dire implications of the phrase
“power corrupts; absolute power corrupts absolutely,” a
major theme in Orwell’s works, is one we will examine
and discuss throughout the course.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc527.htm
David Hunt is a retired member of the UBC Faculty of
Education.
THE HISTORY AND FUTURE OF MONEY —
A NEW TWIST
4 Wednesdays, 2:00–4:20, March 10–31
SCFC 528 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
This course will provide you with a front row seat for
the most exciting change in a hundred years in the
intellectual landscape of money. The field of economics
is going through the most profound paradigm shift
in a century. This global intellectual shift impacts us
now and will continue to affect generations to come.
You can gain an understanding of how economics
will come into its own as a science in the 21st century.
Understanding the history of money can give us a better
picture of where we are now and where we are headed.
What gives money its value? How does it define us?
Why can’t the experts agree? We will deal with these
questions and many others in this course about wealth
and its origins.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc528.htm
Patricia Lalonde is an Independent Financial Advisor with
thirty years experience in finance, business and banking.
EZRA POUND: IDEALIST TO OUTLAW
4 Thursdays, 9:00–11:20, March 11–April 1
SCFC 529 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
Ezra Pound is so central to modern poetry that no one
can claim to fully understand English poetry without
understanding his role in it. The most controversial poet
since Dante, Ezra Pound shaped the world of English
poetry like no one before or after him. Yet he is certainly
the most underappreciated poet in the modern world.
He provided the spark to ignite the style of most of
his peers (Joyce, Yeats, Eliot). He enlarged the world of
English poetry by dealing with entirely new subjects
(history, economics, world literature). In this course we
will consider all things Ezra Pound to better understand
his historical significance. Slides of Pound’s Holy Places
and favourite works of art will illustrate the series.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc529htm
Tom McKeown is a former Instructor of English, a specialist
in Ezra Pound, and the author of three books and two
distance education courses.
GREAT ENGLISH NOVELISTS: E.M. FORSTER,
D.H. LAWRENCE, AND VIRGINIA WOOLF
4 Thursdays, 11:30–1:50, March 11–April 1
SCFC 530 | Room 1415 | Fee: $78
Together we will explore the greats from all over
England. From Lawrence in the Midlands, to Forster’s
characters’ travels — whether from London to Hilton,
or Swanage to Shewsbury. We will then conclude with
Woolf’s affectionate English history in her quintessential
English village. Each writer had varied angles on England,
and its “condition” as they saw it. These British novelists
span the period 1910–40, and their books grow
increasingly audacious as they change and expand the
range and possibilities of the form of fiction. Our broad
context is the contrast between the nation before and
after World War I. We will cover, in this order, Howards
End, by E.M. Forster; Sons and Lovers, by D.H. Lawrence:
and Between the Acts, by Virginia Woolf.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc530.htm
Malcolm Page is Professor Emeritus, English Department,
Simon Fraser University, and author of a study of E.M.
Forster.
Full course descriptions at www.sfu.ca/seniors
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m a r ch c o u r s e s
CANADA-CHINA RELATIONS FROM MAO TO NOW
4 Fridays, 9:00–11:20, March 5–26 (note earlier starting
date)
SCFC 531 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Ever since the founding of the People’s Republic of
China (PRC) in 1949, Canada–China relations have been
tempestuous. In the early period, the Chinese masses
were given a rosy view of Canadians by Mao Zedong’s
essay praising the heroic work of our Dr. Norman Bethune.
However, those feelings changed when the Korean
War placed Canada and China on opposite sides of the
conflict. After peace was restored in Korea, Canada broke
the American-led isolation of PRC by extending wheat
sales and later diplomatic recognition to China — but
effective cooperation was limited because of internal
turmoil. In this course we will explore these and other
important themes in China’s contemporary historical
evolution.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc531.htm
Earl Drake has worked in China for many years as
Ambassador and as Canadian International Development
Agency project manager.
MUSIC AND MEANING: EXPLORING HOW WORDS,
MUSIC AND EXPRESSION COME TOGETHER
4 Fridays, 11:30–1:50, March 5–26 (note earlier starting
date)
SCFC 532 | Room 1800 | Fee: $78
Music and Meaning is conceived as a series of four selfcontained lectures dealing with the common theme of
words, music, and expression. “Music and Poetry” will
consider the methods composers use to convey the
meaning of a particular text, using well-known sacred
and secular texts as examples. In “Music and Drama”
we will discuss the ways in which music can heighten
or transform a theatrical experience. This topic leads
naturally to “Music and Cinema,” which will examine
how music affects our perception of images, situations,
and dialogue. Finally, in “Modern Music and Expression”
we will observe how composers of the early twentieth
century expanded the vocabulary of musical language
to communicate stronger sensations and achieve finer
nuances of meaning.
See full description: www.sfu.ca/seniors/scfc532.htm
Nicolas Krusek is a professional musician and conductor.
PRESENTS
thomas adEs PIANO
SUNDAY, MARCH 14, 2010 3.00PM
PRE-CONCERT TALK AT 2.15PM
The Chan CenTre for The Performing arTs
This concert features the world premiere of a new
composition by Adès commissioned by the Vancouver
Recital Society and works by Janáček, Liszt/Wagner,
Prokofiev, Schubert and Beethoven
SEASON SPONSOR
CO-PRESENTER
CHAN CENTRE CONCERTS
PRIMARY BENEFACTOR
The Chan Endowment
Fund of the University
of British Columbia
MEMBER CIPF
STEVEN ISSERLIS CELLO
DÉNES VÁRJON PIANO
SUNDAY, MARCH 21, 2010 3.00PM
PRE-CONCERT TALK AT 2.15PM
The Chan CenTre for The Performing arTs
Schumann, Barber, Chopin and Dohnanyi
Tickets:
Ticketmaster
604 280 3311
www.ticketmaster.ca
Information:
Vancouver Recital Society
604 602 0363
www.vanrecital.com
13
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f r e e se n i o r s s at u r day f o ru m s , sp r i n g 2 010
The Seniors Program is pleased to present a series of lectures/discussions on topics of general interest, co-sponsored
by the SFU Seniors Lifelong Learners Society. Each talk is about 45–50 minutes long, with time for questions and
discussion following.
Admission is free and open to anyone of any age on a first-come-first-served basis. Each forum begins promptly at
1:00pm, and generally ends before 2:30 pm. No reservation needed for these free forums.
14
YOUR MONEY, YOUR FUTURE: “4 PILES OF MONEY”
Saturday, January 23, 1:00–2:30, Room 1900
Whether you
are already
retired, or a
student, starting
out on a new
life path, you
need to know
how to handle
money. This
forum explores
some solid
concepts about managing your money to get the most
out of what you have. Retired people need to create
income and people starting out need to create a good
foundation for their financial success.
“4 Piles of Money” will teach you how to create a tax
efficient, balanced portfolio of savings and investments.
Patricia Lalonde is an Independent Financial Advisor with
thirty years experience in finance, business and banking.
UNDERSTANDING THE ROOTS OF THE ARAB-ISRAEL
CONFLICT
Saturday, March 20, 1:00–2:30, Room 1900
When it comes to the central
conflict in the Middle East, the
crisis of Israel and Palestine,
the news can be convoluted,
confusing and downright
frustrating. The reason for
this is largely because media
coverage tends to focus solely
on contemporary events
and issues, most of the time
completely eschewing historical context. As with most
phenomena, an understanding of the past is essential
in comprehending the present. In the case of IsraelPalestine — a conflict deeply rooted in modern history
— this truth is even more profound. This seminar will
seek to touch on and explore some of the more salient
aspects of the last one hundred years in an effort to
deepen our understanding of what is perhaps the most
seminal conflict of our time.
Debbie Vanden Dungen has an MA degree in Modern
Middle Eastern History and specializes in the IsraeliPalestinian conflict.
Did you know you can watch our previous forums from the comfort of your home? Visit our forum website
(http://www.sfu.ca/seniors/forums.htm) to watch free streaming videos of our forums including:
Thinking About Terrorism: History
and Context | November 2008
Michael Fellman
Times of Crisis: Why Arts Education
is Crucial to the New Imagination
Economy | October 2008 | Max
Wyman
The Islamic Sharia: Is It a Threat
to Canada? | September 2008 |
Mohamad Rachid
Why Do We Fear Revolutions? |
March 2008 | Jerry Zaslove
A Short Journey into Modern
Medicine, Or Understanding What
Your Doctor Says—A Cautionary Tale
| February 2008 | Susan Baxter
Albert Einstein: A Most
Comprehensibly Incomprehensible
Rebel–Genius | January 2008 | Walter
Cicha
If there is Only One God, Why Are
There So Many Religions? | November
2007 | Harold Rosen
The Mystery of Evil | October 2007 |
David Scherzer
A Republic, Yes; A Democracy, No!:
The Political Consequences of the
American Revolution | September
2007 | Alan David Aberbach
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n o n - c r e d i t c e r t i f i c at e
15
Photo: Wilson Nam
Want to take your learning to a new level?
Why not enroll in our Seniors Program Non-Credit Certificate in the Liberal Arts?
This Certificate is awarded to seniors (55 or better)
who complete at least 10 non-credit courses, with a
minimum of 128 contact hours. For example, a 6-week
course, meeting once per week for two hours, will
generate 12 contact hours towards your Certificate.
(Spring 2010 courses will generate slightly fewer contact
hours, as they are shorter). Participants pay the regular
course fees, plus an additional $20 administrative fee
per course. There are no grades or examinations in the
certificate program. Instead, seniors are required to
complete a short typed (double-spaced) essay between
4 to 6 pages (1000–1500 words).
Your paper should answer one or both of the following
questions:
• How did the course contribute to your appreciation
and knowledge of the subject?
• How and in what way did the course change or alter
your way of thinking?
Your essay should be a thoughtful and personal
response to the above questions, rather than an
overview of what the course covered. Join the many
students who have found the Certificate program adds
a whole new dimension to their learning experience. To
find out more details, please call us at: 778-782-5212.
The SFU Seniors Lifelong Learners Society
Why not join today? The advantages of membership are many: your name will be
placed on our mailing list, and you will receive information on all our activities,
including our social activities—attending theatre, concert, and opera programs
at discount prices. To learn more about who we are and what we do, go to:
www.sfu.ca/seniors/ssociety.htm
Annual membership fee is $15 ($25 for couples). Please make out your cheque to Seniors Lifelong
Learners Society, and mail it to: 2300–515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3.
>
special opera events
16
UNRAVELLING THE SPIRITUAL AND
MYSTIC IDEAS OF RICHARD WAGNER
Saturday, 9:30–12 noon, December 5 |
SCFC 505| Fee: $38
Although this famous (infamous?)
composer was known and often
criticized for his notorious anti-Christian
and anti-Jewish political writings, several
of his operas, mainly Tannhäuser,
Lohengrin, and certain parts of the
Ring, contain unmistakable spiritual
and mystic threads that transcend all
religions. This class will explore Wagner’s
ideas and thoughts, including his essay
“Jesus of Nazareth.”
Alan David Aberbach is the author of The
Ideas of Richard Wagner, (1984, rev. ed,
1988, 2nd edition, 2003), Richard Wagner,
A Mystic in the Making (1991), Richard
Wagner’s Religious Ideas: A Spiritual
Journey (1996, paperback ed, 1998).
HERBERT VON KARAJAN AND THE
ART OF THE OPERA CONDUCTOR
Saturday, 9:30–12 noon, January 23 |
SCFC 533 | Fee: $38
As most opera goers know, the
conductor can make or break a
performance. Between early 1929
when von Karajan conducted his first
opera—Mozart’s The Marriage of Figaro
— and six decades later, early 1989,
when he conducted his last, Verdi’s A
Masked Ball, a recording with the Vienna
Philharmonic, and Placido Domingo, he
established an ascendancy unmatched
by any of his peers. This lecture will
closely examine Karajan’s work with
opera, frequently contrasting his
approaches with those of his peers.
WHAT WOULD OPERA BE WITHOUT
MURDER?
Saturday, 1:00–3:30, March 13 | SCFC
534 | Fee: $38
Even the earliest of operas gave
audiences what they wanted most —
sex, violence, and murder, and things
haven’t really changed. Rigoletto,
Carmen, Salome, and truly hundreds
more operas have followed suit, but
choices must be made. Rather than sex
or violence, this lecture, thoroughly
musically illustrated, will concentrate on
murder, examining motivation, manner,
and method, and the effectiveness of
each composer’s music in supporting
and enhancing the vile deed.
Henry Ewert brings a background of numerous music courses taught for Simon Fraser
University. He is the author of four books, 2009 recipient of the Vancouver Historical
Society’s Award of Merit, holder of an ARCT in piano, former choir director, and presenter
of dozens of lectures for The Opera Club over the last 35 years.
A message from Tapestry At The O’Keefe ...
ADVERTISEMENT
Somebody remind me...
AM I RETIRED
OR AM I ON VACATION?
When you step through the doors of The O’Keefe you will forget
any preconceptions you may have had of a retirement community
A seniors’ residence that’s like a boutique hotel
Tapestry At The O’Keefe –
Arbutus Walk Retirement
Residence has changed the
public perception of what
retirement is all about. We dare
you to call it an “Old Folk’s
Home”!
classes, the garden club and the
Knit Wits, a group of avid knitters
that makes toques and scarves
for single moms. She says when
her 22-year-old granddaughter
came to visit she said, “Grandma,
it’s a cruise ship on land.”
Imagine this, grand piano in the
lobby, concierge desk, elegant
dining room with fresh orchids
and linen, inviting menu, spa,
hair salon, fitness centre,
billiards room, rooftop deck
with panoramic views (and a
putting green), private town car
service, shuttle service—this
feels like a Five Star resort hotel.
Dennis Bruchet moved to
Tapestry at The O’Keefe three
years ago and has found that
each resident at Tapestry at The
O’Keefe has an interesting life
story. Since he doesn’t like to
cook, he appreciates the quality
and variety of dining room
menus. All three emphasized the
security of knowing that nursing
support is there if and when you
need it.
The lifestyle at Tapestry at
The O’Keefe – Arbutus Walk
has been cleverly designed
to promote activity, wellness,
elegance and fun.
Ward Allen has been a resident for over three years says,
“I haven’t died yet but I’m
already in heaven.” He says
before choosing Tapestry at
The O’Keefe he visited four
other retirement communities
and found them to be too
“funereal.”
There is a friendly air about
Tapestry at The O’Keefe that
makes you feel like you’re on
holiday. Judy Warren has been
a resident for over six years and
keeps busy with a broad range
of activities, including painting
Joyce and Ted Waring came
from Victoria two years ago. The
couple, who just celebrated their
63rd wedding anniversary this
year, admit that initially it was
a big adjustment. But with the
active schedule of activities, the
couple are enjoying the freedom
and fun. They still go to Victoria
on regular basis to watch their
favorite hockey team, The
Salmon Kings.
Tapestry at The O’Keefe has a
host of programs and amenities
designed to promote fitness
and well being— from spa
treatments to custom tailored
exercise routines. The fitness
centre is staffed by a full-time
kinesiologist, personal trainers
and recreation staff.
A new “Brain Fitness Program”
developed by Posit Science is
proving to be a hit with O’Keefe
residents like Emma McClean and Vera Wood, both 82.
The two have been lifelong
crossword puzzle fans and
have found the Posit program
challenging and invigorating.
Tapestry at The O’Keefe –
Arbutus Walk was the first in
Canada to offer the program
which focuses on improving the
speed, accuracy and strength
with which our brains receive,
record and recall what we hear.
Exercises are designed to
stimulate very specific chemical
reactions in the brain, and
are intensive, repetitive and
progressively challenging. In a
study of 182 healthy adults aged
60 to 87, 93 per cent of people
using the Brain Fitness Program
significantly increased their
auditory processing speed, with
10 years or more improvement
on average.
“We have to change how
people look at retirement living,”
says Sam Zeitoun, general
manager of Tapestry at The
O’Keefe. “People have to know
there are options. The future of
seniors housing is about being
independent, without being
lonely.” Residency at Tapestry
at The O’Keefe includes
suite maintenance, housekeeping,
telephone, cable TV and
dining services—a subtle support
system which allows residents
the freedom to explore
new recreational and social
opportunities that will enhance
both their well-being and spirit.
Residents
also
experience
peace of mind knowing that
Tapestry at The O’Keefe has a
comprehensive building security
system, and a personal emergency
response system monitored
around the clock by on-site
personnel trained in First
Aid. The emergency response
program (PAL) includes a
telephone and a pendant call
system as well as a smoke
alarm alert and daily “check-in”
procedure.
The Wellness Spa features a Hair
Salon and Treatment Room, as
well as the clinic and consultation
services of Tapestry at The
O’Keefe’s Health and Wellness
Director. As a registered nurse,
the Director coordinates all
Assisted Living, holds health
clinics,
performs
health
assessment and coordinates the
services of therapists and other
health professionals utilizing the
spa and treatment rooms.
For a private tour please call
604-736-1640 or visit us on line
www.discovertapestry.com
Registration Information
Registration begins on Monday November 16, 10 am
Register online at www.sfu.ca/seniors
To register by telephone, call 778-782-5000,
press 3 to bypass automated message.
Or complete the form on the right and return it by fax
to 778-782-5060 or by mail to:
Registration services
Simon Fraser University Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
Registrations can be made in person at the
Information and Registration Services desk. Payment
of the course fee is required before space can be
reserved, and must be paid at the time of registration.
This can be done in person by cash, cheque or credit
card. Please have your VISA or MasterCard number
ready when you call. Mailed registrations should
include a cheque made out to Simon Fraser University
or the appropriate credit card number with an
authorized signature.
18
Course Transfers
Transferring from one course to another is considered
a course cancellation and a new registration.
Photo: Robin Ryan
Donations
The Seniors Program needs your financial help
to grow and expand. All donations are tax
deductible. You can make your contribution
while registering for a course, or simply send
us a cheque (payable to SFU Seniors Program)
to the following address: Seniors Program, SFU
Vancouver, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver,
BC, V6B 5K3.
Certificate Fee
If you have enrolled in, or are planning to apply for,
the Seniors Program Non-Credit Certificate in the
Liberal Arts, you will be required to pay an additional
$20 administration fee for each course.
Cancellation Policy
Please read carefully. If you cancel your registration at
least 7 days before the first class meets, there will be a
full refund less a $20 administration charge. You must
submit your original receipt in order to have the refund
processed. After that time there will be no refund but
substitute registrants are welcome. We regret that full
refunds are not possible unless a course is cancelled.
Tax Benefits
Tuition fees over $100 (cumulative, from the same
institution) may be tax deductible. An official tax receipt
will be mailed to you when we receive your registration
fees.
Notice to email users
We are building an email listing of all seniors taking
credit and/or non-credit courses so we can inform you
quickly of changes and/or additions to the schedule
of classes and send you monthly updates. Please send
your email address to [email protected]
S F U seniors program > Registration Form | January and March 2010
Online registration available at www.sfu.ca/seniors
fax 778-782-5060 or by mail to: Registration services, Simon Fraser University, 515 West Hastings Street, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
First Name
I wish to make a tax-deductible
donation to the SFU Seniors Program $
Last Name
Total amount enclosed: $
Address
City
Province
Telephone (day)
Postal Code
Telephone (evening)
Email
Method of Payment
Cheque (payable to Simon Fraser University)
Card Number
Cardholder’s Name VISA
MasterCard
Expiry Date
Cardholder’s Signature
Seniors Program Courses (please add $20 per course for enrollment in the Non-Credit Certificate in Liberal Arts)
January courses
££ SCFC 506 | The Life And Times of Jesus of Nazareth
4 Mondays, 9:00–11:20, January 4–25 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 507 | Music Drama After Wagner
4 Mondays, 11:30–1:50, January 4–25 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 508 | History of Western Political Thought
4 Mondays, 2:00–4:20, January 4–25 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 509 | Hot Topics: Reading the Media
4 Tuesdays, 9:00–11:20, January 5–26 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 510 | Important Economic Policy Issues Facing Canadians Today
4 Tuesdays, 11:30–1:50, January 5–26 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 511 | Selected Topics on Classical Jewish Thought
4 Tuesdays, 2:00–4:20, January 5–26 | Fee: $83
££ SCFC 512 | The Activist Poetry and Politics of the Vancouver 8
4 Wednesdays, 9:00–11:20, January 6–27 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 513 | ‘Working Images’ : An Introduction to Visual Anthropology
4 Wednesdays, 11:30–1:50, January 6–27 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 514 | Remarkable Prime Ministers
4 Wednesdays, 2:00–4:20, January 6–27 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 515 |The Fairness Factor
4 Thursdays, 9:00–11:20, January 7–28 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 516 | Revealers and Revelations
4 Thursdays, 11:30–1:50, January 7–28 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 535 | Eastern Wisdom for Modern Life: Confucius
4 Thursdays, 2:00–4:20, January 7–28 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 517 | A Crash Course on Jazz:
4 Fridays, 9:00–11:20, January 8–29 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 518 | Worshipping in the Land of Olympus: Greek Sanctuaries
4 Fridays, 11:30–1:50, January 8–29 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 519 | The Art of Political Doublespeak
4 Fridays, 2:00–4:20, January 8–29 | Fee: $78
March courses
££ SCFC 520 | Petrarch and His World
4 Mondays, 9:00–11:20, March 8–29 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 521 | Charles Darwin: His Life and Ideas
4 Mondays, 11:30–1:50, March 8–29 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 522 | The Fascinating World of Geoffrey Chaucer and The
Canterbury Tales
4 Mondays, 2:00–4:20, March 8–29 | Fee: $83
££ SCFC 523 | The Woman as Hero in Western Literature
4 Tuesdays, 9:00–11:20, March 9–30 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 524 | National Opera: The Story of Its 19th Century Revitalization
4 Tuesdays, 11:30–1:50, March 9–30 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 525 | Biblical Figures in the Qur’an
4 Tuesdays, 2:00–4:20, March 9–30 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 526 | Glorious Excess
4 Wednesdays, 9:00–11:20, March 10–31 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 527 | Power and Politics: George Orwell’s Epic 1984 Revisited
4 Wednesdays, 11:30–1:50, March 10–31 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 528 | The History and Future of Money
4 Wednesdays, 2:00–4:20, March 10–31 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 529 | Ezra Pound: Idealist to Outlaw
4 Thursdays, 9:00–11:20, March 11–April 1 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 530 | Great English Novelists
4 Thursdays, 11:30–1:50, March 11–April 1 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 531 | Canada-China Relations from Mao to Now
4 Fridays, 9:00–11:20, March 5–26 | Fee: $78
££ SCFC 532 | Music and Meaning
4 Fridays, 11:30–1:50, March 5–26 | Fee: $78
Special Opera Events
££ SCFC 505 | Richard Wagner | Saturday, 9:30, December 5 | Fee: $38
££ SCFC 533 | Herbert von Karajan | Saturday, 9:30, January 23 | Fee: $38
££ SCFC 534 | Opera & Murder | Saturday, 1:00, March 13 | Fee: $38
Collection of Personal Information
The University collects your personal information under the authority of the University Act (RSBC 1996, c. 468, s. 27(4)(a)). The information is related directly to and needed by the University to administer
and operate non-credit programs, workshops and courses. The information will be used to register you in the appropriate non-credit program, monitor your academic progress and send you information
about University programs. It will also be used to issue certificates and diplomas for eligible students. If you have any questions or requests about the collection and use of this information please contact
the Seniors Program, Continuing Studies, Simon Fraser University Vancouver at Harbour Centre, Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3, e-mail [email protected], 778-782-5212.
Personal information collected by the University for non‑credit certificate and diploma programs is also related directly to and needed by the University to administer and operate its alumni programs and
services. The information will be used to register non-credit certificate and diploma program graduates as members of the SFU Alumni Association. This, and other information held by the University, will
be disclosed to Alumni Relations and University Advancement in order to inform you about the benefits of University and Alumni Association career, educational and social programs; to provide you with
information about alumni products and services; to facilitate alumni participation in university research projects, alumni surveys and fund raising and development activities; and, to administer elections
for university and alumni association governing bodies. The University may also disclose this information, under strict confidentiality agreements, to outside agencies solely for the provision of mailing or
telephoning services on behalf of the University or the Alumni Association. If you have any questions or requests about the collection, use or disclosure of this information, contact the Director of Alumni
Relations, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC V5A 1S6, telephone 778-782-4154, e-mail [email protected] , or visit the Alumni Association web site at www.sfu.ca/alumni/.
GRANDPARENTING IN
THE 21st CENTURY
515 West Hastings Street
Dr. Alan David
Aberbach,
moderator and Director,
Seniors Program,
Continuing
Studies
SFU Seniors Program
SimonFraserUniversityVancouver
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver,BCV6B5K3
You don’t stop learning when you grow old ... you grow old when you stop learning!
SPINE
FRONT
The Seniors Program and
The Seniors Program in Continuing Studies at Simon Fraser University was
established in 1975. It remains an integral part of SFU’s commitment to help
Thetheir
SeniorS
SocieTy
older adults achieve
intellectual, LifeLong
professional, andLearnerS
cultural goals through
programs for lifelong learning that build on the strengths of the university and
resources of the community.
The Seniors Program, unique in Canada, has grown greatly over the years. It
offers a wide selection of non-credit courses, credit courses, seniors forums and
individual events open to anyone fifty-five years of age and older regardless of
educational background. Each year over 2000 seniors attend Saturday forums
and participate in credit and over 50 non-credit courses.
OUTREACH pro gr a m 105
The SFU Seniors Lifelong Learners Society, an independent incorporated
society, helped finance this DVD project. The Society represents the interests
and concerns of seniors students and liaises with the university Seniors
Program. Further funding came from Dr. John LaBrie, Dean of Continuing
Studies, at SFU.
SENIORS RIGHTS AND THE
CHALLENGE OF SENIORS ABUSE
This DVD is part of the SFU Seniors
Programdiscussion
Outreach Project
A roundtable
with: and is offered
free of charge to non-profit seniors centres
seniors organizations. Additional
Joanand
Braun
roundtable discussion DVDs are available.
If youSpencer
wish more information kindly
Charmaine
email [email protected] or call 778.782.5212, or write to:
Dr. Elisabeth Drance
Moderator: Dr. Alan David Aberbach
Seniors Program, Continuing Studies
Simon Fraser University Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
You don’t stop learning when you grow old ... you grow old when you stop learning!
BACK
FRONT
The Seniors Program and
The SFU Seniors Program in Continuing Studies was established in 1974. It
remains an integral part of SFU’s commitment to help older adults achieve
THE
SENIORS
LIFELONG
LEARNERS
SOCIETY
their intellectual,
professional,
and cultural
goals through
programs for lifelong
learning that build on the strengths of the university and resources of the
community.
The Seniors Program, unique in Canada, has grown greatly over the years. It
now offers a wide selection of academically exciting and challenging non-credit
courses, monthly seniors forums, and individual events open to anyone 55+
regardless of educational background. Each year over 2000 seniors participate
in our programs.
OUTREACH PROGR AM
SPINE
We acknowledge with appreciation funding from the following:
• The SFU Seniors Lifelong Learners Society
• Dr. Yosef Wosk, Director of Interdisciplinary Programs at SFU and founder
of the Philosophers’ Café program.
• Dr. David Kaufman, Director of the Learning and Instructional Centre, SFU
This DVD is part of the SFU Seniors Program Outreach Project and is offered
A roundtable discussion with:
free of charge to non-profit seniors centres and seniors organizations. Additional
RabbiIfYosef
Wosk
roundtable discussion DVDs are available.
you wish
more information, email
Shirley Stockdill
[email protected], call 778-782-5212,Reverend
or write to:
Imam Mohamad Rachid
Seniors Program,Moderator:
Continuing Studies
Dr. Alan David Aberbach
Simon Fraser University Vancouver
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
You don’t stop learning when you grow old ... you grow old when you stop learning!
FRONT
The Seniors Program and
THE SENIORS LIFELONG LEARNERS SOCIETY
OUTREACH PROGR AM 104
DEMOCRACY: THE INTENT
AND THE REALITY
PERCEPTIONS OF GOD
AND HEAVEN (AFTERLIFE)
Outreach Program 104
Alan Herbert, former member Vancouver City Council
BACK
Outreach Program 101
ThisDVDispartoftheSFUSeniorsProgramOutreachProjectandisoffered
A roundtable discussion with:
free of charge
non-profit
seniors
centresEmeritus,
and seniors
Dr. to
Gloria
Gutman,
Professor
SFUorganizations.
Gerontology Dept.
AdditionalroundtablediscussionDVDsareavailable.Ifyouwishmore
Lillian Zimmerman, Research Associate, SFU Gerontology Dept.
information, email [email protected], call 778-782-5212, or write to:
SPINE
Outreach Program 105
Outreach Program 102
You don’t stop learning when you grow old... you grow old when you stop learning!
Email [email protected]
The Seniors Program, unique in Canada, has grown greatly over the years.
It now offers a wide selection of academically exciting and challenging
non-credit courses, monthly seniors forums, and individual events open
to anyone 55+ regardless of educational background. Each year over 2000
seniors participate in our programs.
OUTREACH PROGRAM
The
ChangIng
Vancouver,
BC V6B 5K3 faCes of Canada
A roundtable discussion with:
Dr. Kogila Adam-Moodley, Professor,
The Seniors Program and
The SFU Seniors Program in Continuing Studies was established in 1974. It
remains an integral
of SFU’s commitment
to help
older adults achieve
THEpart
SENIORS
LIFELONG
LEARNERS
SOCIETY
their intellectual, professional, and cultural goals through programs for
lifelong learning that build on the strengths of the university and resources
of the community.
We acknowledge with appreciation funding from the following:
• TheSFUSeniorsLifelongLearnersSociety
• Dr.YosefWosk,DirectorofInterdisciplinaryProgramsatSFUandfounder
of the Philosophers’ Café program.
• Dr.DavidKaufman,DirectoroftheLearningandInstructionalCentre,SFU
Seniors Program, Continuing Studies
Simon Fraser University
Vancouver
Multiculturalism
and
the Canadian Identity:
Anthropology
and come
Sociology
of Education, UBC
Funds for this
program have
from:
Peter
McKnight,
columnist
and editorial
writer, The Vancouver Sun
• The
SFU
Seniors Lifelong
Learners
Society
Alan David Aberbach, moderator and
• Andy Smail, aDr.
member
of the Lifelong Learners Society
Director of the SFU Seniors Program
• Dr. Yosef Wosk, Director of Interdisciplinary Studies and
founder of the Philosopher’s Café program
FRONT
Democracy: The Intent and the Reality
outreach program
BACK
Perception of God and Heaven (Afterlife)
This DVD is part of the SFU Seniors Program Outreach Project
and is offered free of charge to non-profit seniors centres
and seniors organizations. Additional roundtable discussion
DVDs are available. If you wish more information kindly email
[email protected] or call 778.782.5212, or write to:
Outreach Program 103
at
The Seniors Program and
Each year, over 2000 seniors participate in credit courses, noncredit courses, and monthly Seniors Forums at our downtown
The Seniors Lifelong Learners Society
Vancouver Harbour Centre building and at the Surrey campus.
SPINE
Seniors Rights and the Challenge of Seniors Abuse
hown
s and
FRONT
Grandparenting in the 21st Century
a
ocuses
Multiculturalism and the Canadian Identity: The changing faces of Canada
ourses,
our
d at
BACK
SPINE
Expanding to Meet Your Needs:
The SFU Outreach Project
A roundtable discussion with:
Dr. Alan David Aberbach
Dr. André Gerolymatos
Dr. John Harriss
Moderator: Dr. Adrienne Burk
You don’t stop learning when you grow old ... you grow old when you stop learning!
Web www.sfu.ca/seniors
The SFU Seniors Outreach Project is now entering its 4th successful year of community
service, and is now embarking on an ambitious expansion plan throughout 2009/2010.
Raising awareness and promoting education for seniors
can’t be limited to Vancouver’s city limits. That’s why the
SFU Seniors Program created a special series of expertroundtable interactive discussion DVDs that can be
enjoyed by older adults across Canada. So far, the program
has produced 5 exciting DVDs exploring issues of concern
to seniors, including Perceptions of God and Heaven
(Afterlife), Multiculturalism and the Canadian Identity,
Grandparenting in the 21st Century, Democracy: The Intent
and the Reality, and Seniors Rights and the Challenge of
Elder Abuse. The DVDs are specially designed to include
natural pauses wherein discussion leaders can pose
important questions to live audiences about the issues
being discussed. After the presentation is complete, seniors
are also encouraged to complete an evaluation form,
outlining what they learned and how they see a given issue
differently.
The Outreach Program DVDs have now been seen by over
3,500 seniors from Victoria to St. John’s Newfoundland,
with over 250 partner organizations agreeing to present
the tapes to lifelong learners in their communities. Some
of these partner organizations include public libraries,
assisted living centres, senior centres, and community
centres. In 2008, the program posted all 5 existing DVDs
online, so seniors (or anyone?) can view them from the
comfort of their homes anywhere in the world.
This year, the Outreach Program is planning to expand
its series, with new topics covering important issues, such
as age-friendly communties, older adult nutrition, and
much more. We expect to release our next DVD in the
series by early 2010. If you would like to learn more about
this exciting program, please visit our Outreach Program
website at: www.sfu.ca/seniors/outreach.htm or call
778-782-5212.
Register online at www.sfu.ca/seniors
Continuing Studies
515 West Hastings Street
Vancouver, BC V6B 5K3
Download

& Opera Studies Program seniors program January– april 2009