Department of English and Comparative
Literary Studies
UNDERGRADUATE HANDBOOK FOR JOINT
DEGREE STUDENTS AND ANY STUDENTS
TAKING AN ENGLISH MODULE.*
2013-2014
Please note: This document is accurate on the date of printing. Any changes which are to be made will
be done so to the online version, which can be found at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/joint
To be read in conjunction with the Undergraduate Handbook issued by your home department
1
CONTENTS
Page
DEPARTMENT INFORMATION
Term Dates/Reading Weeks
Website/Office/Contacts
Academic Staff
Communications
3
4
5-6
7
YOUR DEGREE
Policies and Regulations
8-9
YOUR FIRST YEAR
Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS)
Attendance
English Department Modules
Electronic Module Registration (EMR)
Module Choices for Second Year
10
10
11-13
14
14
YOUR HONOURS YEARS
Director of Undergraduate Studies
EMR/Timetables
Attendance/Module Choices for 2014/15
Visiting Students/Registering Modules Online
Module Contract
Essay Writing & Plagiarism
Deadlines/Additional Support
15
15
15
16
16
17
17
YOUR WORK
Essays
Examinations
The Marking of Essays and Examinations
Special Circumstances
Cheating in a University Test
18 -20
21
21 - 23
24 - 26
27 - 28
YOUR PROGRESS
Check Points
29 - 30
YOUR VIEWS
Module Evaluations
Student-Staff Liaison Committee
Education Officer/Complaints & Feedback
Academic Staff
Academic Staff
31
31
31
31
31
APPENDICES
A
B
32
33 -34
C
D
Lecture Times
Modules 2013 - 2014:
Methods of Assessment
Essay Deadlines
Special Circumstances Form
35
36
2
DEPARTMENT INFORMATION
TERM DATES
2013/2014
Autumn Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Monday 30th September 2013 - Saturday 7th December 2013
Monday 6th January 2014 - Saturday 15th March 2014
Wednesday 23rd April 2014 - Saturday 28th June 2014
2014/2015
Autumn Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Monday 29 September 2014 – Saturday 6 December 2014
Monday 5 January 2015 – Saturday 14 March 2015
Monday 20 April 2015 – Saturday 27 June 2015
2015/2016
Autumn Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Monday 5 October 2015 – Saturday 12 December 2015
Monday 11 January 2016 – Saturday 19 March 2016
Monday 25 April 2016 – Saturday 2 July 2016
2016/2017
Autumn Term
Spring Term
Summer Term
Monday 3 October 2016 – Saturday 10 December 2016
Monday 9 January 2017 – Saturday 18 March 2017
Monday 24 April 2017 – Saturday 1 July 2017
READING WEEKS
During week 6 of the Autumn and Spring Terms the Department has Reading Weeks. These are set
aside as private study enabling you to reflect on your learning from the first half of the term and to
prepare for the second half of the term.
Please check whether your seminar tutor holds an office hour during the Reading Weeks.
3
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT WEBSITE
The English Department Website can be found at: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english
ENGLISH DEPARTMENTAL OFFICE
The Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies is located on the 5th Floor of the
Humanities Building, Library Road and some staff from the Warwick Writing Programme will be based in
Millburn House.
Departmental Office is in room H506. All students should contact reception in the first instance. Any
messages or queries will be forwarded to the correct member of staff.
Main office phone number: 024 76524928. An answering service is available outside office opening
hours. The Department Office is open:
Tuesday
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday
9:30am - 12pm
9:30am - 1.00pm
KEY DEPARTMENT CONTACTS
Assistant Secretary for Enquiries
Mrs Caroline Griffin (Mon/Tues/Wed)
Miss Sarah Box (Thurs/Fri)
[email protected]
024 76524928
Miss Lesley McCall
[email protected]
024 76574638
Mrs Sally Wallace
Mar 2014 onwards
[email protected]
TBC
Mrs Tracie Williams
[email protected]
024 76523632
Director of Undergraduate Studies
Dr Paul Botley (First Years)
[email protected] *
024 76523341
Dr Pablo Mukherjee (Honours Years)
[email protected] *
024 76523321
Senior Tutor
Dr Gill Frith
[email protected]
024 76523640
General Enquiries
[email protected]
024 76524928
Undergraduate Secretaries
Secretary for the Warwick Writing
Programme (including English and
Creative Writing degree)
* When emailing the DUGS email account please make sure that you put your name, student ID number
and year of study in the subject line along with your reason for emailing e.g. Joe Smith, 1234567, Year 1,
Extension Request.
4
ACADEMIC STAFF
PERMANENT STAFF
If you need to contact a member of academic staff please email them using their Warwick University
email address. All full time academic staff holds two office hours a week, details of which are available
on our website. Times are also displayed on the noticeboard outside each tutor’s office.
Title
First name
Surname
ROOM
E-MAIL ADDRESS
Dr
Prof.
Dr
Dr
Prof
Prof
Prof.
Mr
Mr
Dr
Dr
Prof.
Dr
Prof
Dr
Dr
Prof.
Mr
Dr
Prof
Dr
Dr
Dr
Prof.
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Liz
Catherine
Paul
Christina
Elizabeth
Paulo
Thomas
Will
John
Ross
Emma
Maureen
Gill
Michael
John
Tess
Tony
Michael
Cathia
Daniel
AL
Madhumita
Nick
Neil
Tina
Graeme
Emma
China
Nick
Barry
Bates
Botley
Britzolakis
Clarke
de Medeiros
Docherty
Eaves
Fletcher
Forman
Francis
Freely
Frith
Gardiner
Gilmore
Grant
Howard
Hulse
Jenainati
Katz
Kennedy
Lahiri
Lawrence
Lazarus
Lupton
Macdonald
Mason
Mieville
Monk
H537
H503
H513
H508
H541
H526
H546
G06
H532
H539
H511
G04a
H510
H517
H533
H516
H534
H544
H512
H531
G06
H523
H535
H519
H515
H536
H525
G03
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
Prof.
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Dr
Prof.
Prof
Prof
Dr
Dr
Prof
Dr
Dr
David
Sarah
Pablo
Mike
Paul
Stephen
Carol
Ian
Stephen
Jonathan
Mark
David
Rashmi
Christiania
Morley
Moss
Mukherjee
Niblett
Prescott
Purcell
Rutter
Sansom
Shapiro
Skinner
Storey
Vann
Varma
Whitehead
Office 1
Coventry
House
G05
G02
H518
H105
H514
H538
H530
G04B
H528
G01
H527
G01
H540
H520
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
TERMS ON
STUDY
LEAVE
Terms 2/3
Term 1
Terms 1/2
Term 2
Term 2
Terms 2/3
5
HONORARY TEACHING FELLOWS WARWICK WRITING PROGRAMME
Peter
Leila
Blegvad
Rasheed
[email protected]
[email protected]
TEACHING FELLOWS
Dr
Gemma
Goodman
Dr
Joe
Jackson
Dr
Stephen
Ross
Dr
Christian
Smith
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
PART TIME (SESSIONAL) TUTORS 2013(14)
Ms
Ms
Ms
Ms
Mr
Dr
Ms
Mr
Mr
Ms
Mr
Dr
Mr
Ms
Ms
Mr
Ms
Ms
Dr
Mr
Dr
Ms
Mr
Mr
Mr
Mr
Dr
Miss
Mr
Mary
Naomi
Roxanne
Cathy
James
Arina
Maria
Nick
Robert
Nesrin
Ben
Amanda
Phil
Gurpreet
Waiyee
Jack
Birgitt
Leah
Sarah
Matthew
Svetlana
Emilie
Lee
Michael
George
Mate
Sherah
Laura
Chris
Addyman
Alsop
Bibizadeh
Charlwood
Christie
Cirstea
Cohut
Collins
Daniel
Degirmencioglu
Fowler
Hopkins
Jourdan
Kaur
Loh
McGowan
Oehle
Phillips
Poynting
Rumbold
Skomorkhova
Taylor-Brown
Thomas
Tsang
Ttoouli
Vince
Wells
Wood
Yiannitsaros
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
[email protected]
RLF FELLOW
Mr
Michael
Bywater
[email protected]
POST DOCTORAL FELLOWS
Dr
Dr
Sorcha
Ashok
Gunne
Malhotra
H527
H509
[email protected]
[email protected]
Research Fellow
British Academy
Research Fellow
6
COMMUNICATIONS
The department uses a number of methods to communicate with students. Please check your email
frequently in order to ensure that you do not miss any important information.

EMAIL
Email is the department’s preferred method of communication. You will have been given a Warwick
University email address when you registered at the University and this is the email address that you
should use when contacting your tutors and the department office.
You can access your email account in a number of locations on campus: the Computer Centre and the
Library.
Please note: You should check your University email inbox regularly for news from the
department.

DEPARTMENT NOTICEBOARD
There is a noticeboard for every year of the degree course along the corridor of the department.
Information about modules and examinations is posted here regularly so please check the boards.

TUTORS’ NOTICEBOARDS
Each tutor has a small noticeboard outside their office on which they regularly post notices. You are
advised to check these regularly.

CONTACT DETAILS
You are responsible for ensuring that the University and the department have the correct contact
information for you. If there are any changes during the year, it is critical that you update your records.
You can access your contact records via Start.Warwick on the University’s website.

MAIL
If you receive any mail in the department, this will be kept in the English Office for collection and the
Receptionist will notify you via email. (Please note that any post which is not collected will be ‘returned to
sender’ at the end of term.)
7
YOUR DEGREE
POLICIES AND REGULATIONS
You need to be aware of the following Policies and Regulations because they affect your results.
Required completion of module work
Students are required to complete all components of each module to pass. Information regarding the
requirements of each module can be found on individual module websites.
This rule is in accordance with University Regulation 36.2, which ‘sets out general requirements and
expectations in terms of progress, attendance and the completion of work.’
The following is excerpted from regulation 36.2:
1.
Students are expected to engage fully with their course of study, take responsibility for their own
learning and co-operate with their department and wider University as members of the University
community. Students must comply with the requirements for their course as set out by the
department.
2.
Students are expected to inform departments of any health problems, changes in circumstances or
other difficulties that may affect their progress. If a student fails to inform the department, these
circumstances cannot be taken into account.
3.
Students may be required by the Head of Department to meet with staff in the department.
Students may also be required to meet with administrative staff in the wider University.
4.
If a student’s progress or behaviour persistently fails to meet the expectations set out in this
Regulation and departmental course requirements, the Head of Department may recommend to a
Continuation of Registration Committee that the student be required to withdraw (under section
36.4.4).
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/calendar/section2/regulations/reg36registrationattendanceprogress/
Absence through illness
1. Always let both your module and personal tutors know if you have had to miss lectures or seminars
through illness.
2. If your illness lasts less than three consecutive days but causes you to miss seminars and/or lectures,
you should write a note and give it to your personal tutor or to the departmental undergraduate secretary.
3. If your illness causes absence of more than three consecutive days from prescribed classes you
should, in accordance with University rules, provide a doctor’s certificate. Such a certificate is also
essential if you miss an examination or a deadline for an assessed essay through illness.
4. Submit a doctor’s certificate to your personal tutor or to the departmental office as soon as possible
after your return to health. Normally no allowance can be made for illness (e.g. by extensions to
assessed essay deadlines) without a proper certificate.
8
Non-Assessed Essays
Non-Assessed Essays – First-Year Only
A number of first year modules require students to submit formative essays which are not awarded a
mark but which are nonetheless required for passing the module. Any first year student who, without
good cause, still has unassessed work outstanding by the end of week 3 of term 3, will carry a mark of 40
for the module concerned, regardless of whether they gain a higher mark in their final assessment (be
that by examination and/or assessed essay).
Please submit your non-assessed essays via e-submission AS WELL AS handing the hard copy in to
your seminar tutor by the agreed deadline for each piece of work.
Use of Mobile Phones/Laptops/Tablets and Other Electronic Devices
Mobile phones should be switched to silent for lectures and seminar classes to minimise disruption to
your fellow students and tutor.
Use of mobile phones, laptops, tablets and other electronic devices, unless for the express use of taking
notes or making a presentation, is not allowed in seminar classes. Your seminar tutor may ask you to
leave the seminar and mark you down as absent without excuse if you abuse this privilege.
Please note: students are not allowed to record lectures unless given express permission.
9
YOUR FIRST YEAR
DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
Your First Year Director of Undergraduate Studies (DUGS) is Dr Paul Botley. There is a DUGS webpage
on the department’s website where you will find information about applying for extensions to assessed
essay deadlines, applying for consideration under the special circumstances procedures, how to
withdraw temporarily or permanently from your course and how to change your degree course as well as
details of Paul Botley’s office hours. You can contact DUGS by email at [email protected]
PLEASE REMEMBER: The first year of your degree is a foundational year. You must pass it in order to
proceed into the second year, HOWEVER, whilst the marks you receive during your first year are
important, they do not form part of the final degree classification.
ATTENDANCE

Attendance at lectures is expected. Lecture times for 2013/14 are given in Appendix A. Please be
aware that the recording of lectures by students is strictly forbidden without the explicit prior
permission of the lecturer and that, where such permission is granted, the recording is for use by
the students as a personal study aid only and should not be distributed, published or in any way
transmitted for use by others

Seminar group attendance is compulsory and a register is taken at each meeting

If you miss a seminar through illness you must contact the seminar tutor with an explanation. The
tutor may ask you to provide a medical note to support your claim

If you are absent for personal reasons other than illness, you should inform the seminar tutor as
well as your personal tutor of your absence. If the reasons for your absence are likely to affect your
academic work you may wish to be considered as having Special Circumstances. (Please see the
Special Circumstances section for more details)

Please note: Being or requesting to be considered under the auspices of Special
Circumstances does not mean you no longer need to inform your tutor of absence.
You must still contact your seminar tutor if your particular special circumstances are affecting your
attendance each time you are absent. If you do not, this could affect your monitoring points.
10
ENGLISH DEPARTMENT MODULE INFORMATION FOR JOINT DEGREE
STUDENTS
As you have been admitted to one of the following joint degree programmes with English, you will take
modules(s) in the English Department:



English and French
English and German
English and Italian



English and Latin
Philosophy and Literature
Film and Literature
Please see the following grid for the English Department core modules for your degree course, and the
optional cores which are open to you in the Department of English in your first year.
You must do three things:
1) You will already have been timetabled for any core module and these details can either be
obtained from your home department or by visiting the English Department where these details
will be posted up outside reception, room H506, 5th floor of the Humanities Building
2) During your first week, you must then sign up for any further optional core English module by
going along to the English department reception, room H506, 5th floor of the Humanities Building.
This is the ONLY way you can be added to an English module. You may want to attend the
lectures in week 1 before you make up your mind. See page 12/13 for summary of modules and
page 32 for lecture times
3) Please let your ‘home’ department know which optional core module you are opting for
Following this registration process for your optional core module, you will be given a letter stating which
seminar group you have been assigned to, where and when the seminar takes place, and who the tutor
is. You should take this letter along with you to your first meeting, and the seminar tutor will add you to
their register. If there are any problems with the timing of your seminars, i.e. teaching clashes, you
should first discuss with your home department to see if the matter can be sorted, if not, please come
back to the English Department reception in order to sort out the issue, i.e. changing seminar groups.
Please note: All English Department lectures will run in week 1. All English Department 1st year
seminars will start in week 2. A register is taken at all seminars and attendance is compulsory.
COMPULSORY CORE
MODULES
QR31 English & French
EN105 Approaches to Reading
in English and French
OPTIONAL CORE MODULES
(Choice of one or two modules)
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature OR EN101 The
Epic Tradition. Students may also attend the lecture for EN123
Modern World Literatures
QR32 English and German Literature
EN101 The Epic Tradition OR EN121 Medieval to Renaissance
EN122 Modes of Reading
English Literature OR EN123 Modern World Literatures
QR33 English and Italian Literature
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature OR EN123
EN101 The Epic Tradition
Modern World Literatures
QQ36 English and Latin Literature
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature OR EN122
EN101 The Epic Tradition
Modes of Reading
VQ52 Philosophy and Literature
(Or can take a Philosophy option instead):
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature OR EN101 The
EN122 Modes of Reading
Epic Tradition OR EN123 Modern World Literatures
QW26 Film and Literature
EN122 Modes of Reading
No Optional Core in English
11
FIRST YEAR MODULE CHOICES
EN101:
The Epic Tradition
Convenor: Dr Elizabeth Clarke
Course Description and Aims
Chronologically this is the first of the Warwick English Department’s distinctive genre-based modules, in
which the great literary genres are studied (through translation where appropriate). The principal texts
(Homer’s Iliad, and Odyssey, Virgil’s Aeneid, Milton’s Paradise Lost, and Derek Walcott’s Omeros) form
a foundation for the module, in the same way as they served as objects for study and imitation (to a
greater or lesser extent) to all the writers who followed.
Learning Outcomes
By the end of the module you should have:
1. Arrived at a good working knowledge of the three crucial texts of ancient Europe; Homer’s Iliad,
and Odyssey, and Virgil’s Aeneid.
2. Made a detailed study of the seventeenth-century English epic, Milton’s Paradise Lost.
3. Acquired an understanding of the ways in which epic tradition is alluded to, commented upon,
and continued, in a modern text - Derek Walcott’s Omeros.
4. Obtained some knowledge of the typical structures, motifs and aims of European epic poetry, and
the ways in which these are modified to accord with distinct cultural, political, and religious
circumstances.
EN121:
Medieval to Renaissance English Literature
Convenors: Dr Christiania Whitehead (Term1) Dr Paul Botley (Terms 2 & 3)
Course Description and Aims
This module will study a number of works of medieval and renaissance English literature in the context of
contemporary beliefs, and historical and social developments. This module will be taught by means of
language classes (term 1, week 2-5) to introduce students to Middle English: lectures on the historical
culture and critical context, and seminars (approximately 15 students) to discuss particular texts.
Outline Syllabus
Term 1 will be devoted to Medieval Literature, term 2 to Renaissance Literature.

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (ed.) J. Burrow (Penguin). It is important that you should buy
this edition.

Chaucer, The Riverside Chaucer (ed.) L. Benson (Oxford).

The Norton Anthology of English Literature. The Sixteenth Century, the Early Seventeenth
Century, Eighth edition, Volume B.

An Anthology of Elizabethan Prose Fiction (ed.) P. Salzman (Oxford World Classics).
12
EN122:
Modes of Reading
Convenor: Dr Gemma Goodman
Course Description and Aims
The module offers an introduction to the practice of criticism. Form, genre, and literary inheritance will be
among the topics addressed. The module enables students to work with a variety of critical approaches,
and to develop an informed awareness of the possibilities available to them as readers and critics.
Thematically organised lectures provide a frame of cultural reference on which the students will draw, in
their close readings in seminars.
Outline Syllabus
The module is comprised of four units:
1)
2)
3)
4)
Nation, Culture and Place
The Angel of History
Theorising the self and others around 1969
Shocks and Sympathies
Required texts:




Sam Selvon,
Hanif Kurieshi,
Angela Carter,
Allen Ginsberg
The Lonely Londoners
The Buddha of Suburbia
The Magic Toyshop
Howl and Other Poems (City Lights Books, 1986)

David Lodge and Nigel Wood

J.A. Cuddon (ed.)
Modern Criticism and Theory: A Reader (3rd edition)
[ISBN: 9780582784543]
Dictionary of Literary Terms and Literary Theory revised by
C.E.Preston [ISBN: 9780140513639]
The last two texts are available from the university bookshop at a special discounted price.
Seminar discussion will draw on a wide range of contemporary poetry, fiction, and theatre.
EN123:
Modern World Literatures
Convenor: Dr Nick Lawrence
Overview
This module is an introduction to some of the defining concerns, historical contexts and characteristic
formal features of modern world literatures from 1789 to the present. The syllabus is divided into
sections on literatures of the Enlightenment and Romanticism, nineteenth-century modernity and empire,
modernism and world war, and the Cold War/decolonization period, with a focus on post-1989 writing in
the third term.
Teaching is by a weekly lecture and small-group seminar. Lectures introduce literary, historical and/or
theoretical contexts as well as discussion of specific authors and works, while seminars involve closer
discussion of the texts themselves.
The set texts vary from year to year, but may include the following:
Goethe, Faust Part I; Shelley, Frankenstein; Baudelaire, “The Painter of Modern Life”; Conrad, Heart of
Darkness; Lu Xun, “A Madman’s Diary”; Kafka, The Metamorphosis; T. S. Eliot, The Waste Land; Brecht,
Mother Courage and Her Children; Beckett, Endgame; Nabokov, Lolita; Ngugi wa Thiong’o, A Grain of
Wheat.
13
ELECTRONIC MODULE REGISTRATION (EMR)

You will be able to register for your modules online once you have finalised the modules you are
taking, along with your timetable. EMR is open until mid-October and you must register within
that timeframe

Please do not try to register for modules before you have received and made any
necessary changes to your timetable

Following the instructions about Module Registration, (available on the Academic Office
Examination website) you will note that you have to register whether will be taking your English
modules by assessment or examination
This is quite simple in your first year as there is only one option available to you for these modules.
However, you still have to register, so below you will find details of which option to 'choose' on
the EMR system.
EN101 the Epic Tradition
B
100% Examined
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance
B
100% Examined
EN122 Modes of Reading
A
100% Assessed
EN123 Modern World Literature
A1
100% Assessed

It is very important that you check that your modules and the corresponding assessment patterns
are correct. Failure to do so could mean that you may not be registered correctly for
examinations

Please note that you will not be able to change your assessment pattern after the Term 1
deadline. Changes to assessment patterns in January are NOT allowed on English
Department modules
MODULE CHOICES FOR SECOND YEAR
 At the start of term 3 in your first year you will be given information regarding any optional/core
modules available from the English for your second year (unless you will be abroad in your
second year)
 You will be asked to select your preferred modules for your second year.
The English Office will allocate students to modules taking into account the preferences
indicated and will inform students of the modules which they have been given during term 3.
Please note that all allocations are provisional at this stage, however, and will be confirmed at
the start of the next academic year.
14
YOUR HONOURS YEARS
Having already spent at least one year in the department, you should be aware of most of the
procedures and expectations. This section provides a reminder of things you need to do (and things you
shouldn’t do!) during your honours years.
ELECTRONIC MODULE REGISTRATION (EMR)
Once you have registered for your modules in October you cannot change your registration in EMR
under any circumstances, even in January.
DIRECTOR OF UNDERGRADUATE STUDIES
Dr Pablo Mukherjee is Honours Level Director of Undergraduate Studies. He has a webpage
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/dus/ on the department’s website
where you will find information about applying for extensions to assessed essay deadlines and applying
for consideration under the special circumstances procedure. You can contact Pablo Mukherjee by
emailing him at [email protected]
TIMETABLES
Your personal timetable will be emailed to you before the start of the first term. Lectures and seminars
for all honours level modules begin in Week 1 of the first term. If you have not received your
personal timetable before the start of term, please contact the English Office at [email protected]
ATTENDANCE
You are expected to attend all lectures. A list of lecture times for 2013/14 is given in Appendix A.
Attendance at seminars is compulsory.
MODULE CHOICES FOR 2014/15
We will publicise details of all modules running in 2014/15 towards the end of the Spring term. At the
start of the Summer term you will be able to apply for modules in the English Department by completing
the correct form available from the English Department. This is the ONLY way to be allocated to a
module in the English Department. Please refer to your home department’s web pages for details of
your degree structure. There will be separate forms for each of the following Joint Degree students:

English and German - current third years who are abroad will be given a form by a
representative from the German Department over the Easter holiday

English and Italian - current second years who are abroad will be given a form by a
representative from the Italian Department over the Easter holiday. Current third years will need
to obtain a form from the English Department

Philosophy and Literature - current second years will need to obtain a form from the English
Department

Film and Literature - current second years will need to obtain a form from the English
Department

English and Latin - current second years will need to obtain a form from the English Department

English and French - current third years who are abroad will be mailed a form by the English
Department on the day of the options meeting by the English Department

Students from other departments (outside of the Arts Faculty): will need to obtain a form
from the English Department.
15
VISITING STUDENTS
The Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies supports the full range of visiting,
ERASMUS and study-abroad programmes and their role in nurturing intellectual and cultural exchange.
Our staff members have made the commitment to engage in dialogue with you and evaluate your critical
work. Once you enter our seminars, we make no distinction between you and other Warwick students.
Your main contact for English Department matters:
Dr Nick Lawrence is your personal tutor if you are based in the English Department during your stay at
Warwick. If you have questions or problems please contact Dr Lawrence; Dr Lawrence’s weekly office
hours are posted outside his office, which are on the fifth floor of the Humanities Building.
Otherwise, your personal tutor is the contact from your base department:
German:
Dr Christine Achinger
[email protected]
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/german/people/christineachinger/
Italian:
Dr Maude Vanhaelen
[email protected]
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/italian/staff/vanhaelen/
French:
Dr Oliver Davis
[email protected]
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/french/about/staff/od
REGISTERING ENGLISH MODULES ONLINE
On the Electronic Module Registration (EMR) you should choose the modules you’ve been allocated and
then the assessment methods relevant to your length of time with us:

Choose VA if you are here for a single term only

Choose V2 if you are here for two terms only

If you are here for the full year, please choose the standard assessment code (for example:
EN123 choose A1 or A if you are an honours student)
THE MODULE CONTRACT: PLEASE NOTE!
In many EU universities, you are responsible for your own study. This gives you the freedom to decide
when you want to stop attending a seminar, to hand in an essay or to change modules. UK universities
do not have this culture. Admission to Warwick is highly competitive and space is limited in seminars,
which rarely include more than 15 students. If you sign up for a module and stay in it past the first
two weeks, then you have agreed implicitly to the following terms:
• To consistently attend the module’s lectures and seminars for the duration of your stay
• To do all the assigned reading of the module for the week it is assigned
• To participate actively in seminar discussions
• To submit the module’s essays by the specified deadline (if an essay is handed in past the deadline, it
automatically loses 5 points a day until it receives a mark of zero).
If you don’t meet these terms, you will have prevented someone else from admission to the seminar –
someone who might have been a more responsible participant. As a result your actions will affect our
willingness to accommodate future students from your home institution.
16
ESSAY WRITING AND PLAGIARISM
The academic essay in the UK asks you to make a critical argument about your topic in ways that go
beyond just demonstrating that you can cite previous scholarly arguments. We read the essay as an
intellectual engagement with texts and ideas aimed at a moderately informed reader.
This means we ask you to be more of an independent thinker. Consequently, we take plagiarism – the
use of language or ideas taken from an unacknowledged source – to be a serious breach of the
academic conversation.
To help guide you on what we expect of an essay, we recommend that you purchase and read two
inexpensive books (available from our bookstore or through on-line purchasing):
They Say/I Say: The Moves that Matter in Academic Writing, by Gerald Graff and Cathy Birkenstein
(Norton)
Writing with Sources: A Guide for Students, Gordon S. Harvey (Hackett)
For more information about plagiarism, which is a form of cheating, please see page 26 of this
handbook.
ASSESSMENT FINAL DEADLINES FOR PART-YEAR VISITING STUDENTS
• Students who attend for a full academic year follow the same deadlines and methods of assessment as
those following the English degree courses.
• Students who are only at Warwick for part of the academic year are required to submit essays totalling
3,000 words per module for each term they attend:
 If you are here for the Autumn term (term 1), you will need to submit your essay no later than 12noon
on Tuesday 3rd December 2013.
 If you are here for the Spring term (term 2), you will need to submit your essay no later than 12noon
on Tuesday 11th March 2014.
 If you are here for the Summer term (term 3), you will need to submit your essay no later than
12noon on Tuesday 3rd June 2014.
Do not hand in essays to your tutors; all essays must be submitted directly to the office. Please see
pages 18, 19 and 20 for further details on the structure of your essays and how to submit them.
ADDITIONAL SUPPORT FOR INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS
English language support classes for international students (including courses on grammar, academic
writing and critical reading skills) are available free of charge from the Centre for Applied Linguistics
(CAL) - www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/soc/al
17
YOUR WORK
ESSAYS
TYPES OF ESSAYS
Throughout your years in the Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies you will be
required to write a number of essays. Some of these will be un-assessed (or formative) essays which
mean that any marks given for the work do not contribute to your final grade.
However, most essays will be assessed (or summative) pieces of work, with marks counting towards
your final grade. Both types of essay are important as they help you to develop your skills and improve
your performance over the course. Formative essays are particularly critical in your first year and you
should take every opportunity to hone your essay-writing skills before proceeding into Honours.
ESSAY TITLES
Titles for essays are normally published at least six weeks before the submission deadline. The essay
submission deadlines can be found online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay.
On occasion you may have more than one essay due on the same day. Use the six weeks wisely to
prepare your work so that you are able to submit all of your essays by the appropriate deadline.
STYLE AND PRESENTATION GUIDELINES
Essays can be written in either MLA (Modern Languages Association, http://www.mla.org/ ) conventions
or the MHRA (Modern Humanities Research Association, http://www.mhra.org.uk/) conventions, so long
as you are self-consistent and use the same system throughout the piece of work being submitted.
Handwritten assignments cannot be accepted. Computers for students’ use are available in the work
areas in the Library and the Learning Grid. You are required to keep a back-up of your work and an
electronic copy of any assignments you submit to the department. In the event of computer problems,
please contact the IT Services Helpdesk on ext. 73737.
You should observe the following presentation guidelines for all essays (though for creative writing
work and portfolio submissions, you may use a style agreed with your tutor):
 Line spacing should be 1.5 or double
 Use 12-point type with wide margins for comments
 The pages of your essay should be stapled together
 Your Student ID number should be included in the header or footer on each page of your essay
 Your name should appear only on the cover sheet, which is attached to the essay but NOT on
the pages of the essay itself
 Your essay can be printed on both sides of the paper
18
BIBLIOGRAPHY, FOOTNOTES AND ENDNOTES
All assessed essays and dissertations should have a bibliography of works consulted and cited. There
should be correct and full referencing of sources either as in-text citation, as footnotes or as endnotes.
The purpose of these references is:



To document direct quotation
To credit ideas taken from a primary or secondary source (including single words, phrases and
paraphrases)
To give your reader sufficient information to track your quotation back to its source and to locate
its full text
The key essentials of citation are: clarity, brevity, consistency and completeness.
WORD LENGTH
The word length of your essay includes quotations and excludes footnotes, endnotes and the
bibliography. Tutors will allow a discretionary 10% shortfall or extension of the word length; however they
will not take into account anything which is written after the 10% extension.
This could have severe repercussions on your mark, as your concluding paragraphs will not be read, so
make sure that your work does not exceed the maximum word length allowed. If your work does exceed
the maximum word length allowed, the following penalties will be given:



10-15% over/under 5 points will be deducted from the mark for the essay
15-50% over/under 10 points will be deducted from the mark for the essay
More than 50% over/under 20 points will be deducted from the mark for the essay
Please also note that if your work does not meet the requirements of the rubric, then your essay may
lose up to 20 marks.
ESSAY SUBMISSION
A list of essay deadlines can be found at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay
ASSESSED ESSAY DEADLINES ARE 12 NOON ON TUESDAYS (UNLESS STATED OTHERWISE).
5 MARKS PER DAY (EXCLUDING WEEKENDS AND BANK HOLIDAYS) WILL BE DEDUCTED FROM
LATE ESSAYS WHERE AN EXTENSION HAS NOT BEEN GRANTED.
One hard copy of your essay must be submitted to the English Office by 12 noon on the stipulated
deadline (from 12:01 on the day they are due to 12:00 the next day is counted as 1 day). Essays
submitted by email or fax will not be accepted. If you submit an essay outside office hours, you should
post it through the letterbox at the English Office.
Please submit one copy of your essay: this copy will be marked and returned to you.
When you submit your essay remember to complete and attach a cover sheet. Cover sheets are
available both online (http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay)
and from the tray outside the English Office (room H506).
19
You should fill in all fields on this sheet and you must sign the plagiarism declaration. Essays cannot be
accepted without a completed and signed cover sheet.
In addition to the hard copy you MUST also submit your essay in an ‘electronic format’ using the
department’s online submission system, the correct page for this can be found at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/.
The deadline for submitting the electronic copy of your essay is 12 noon on the same day as the hard
copy. Full instructions on how to make an electronic submission are online.
Please remember you have not completed your submission until you have handed in your hard copy
AND uploaded your essay via the e-submission system. Failure to do either by the specified deadline
will mean that your essay is LATE.
If you have submitted either hard copy or electronic copy (or both) after 12:00 (even 12:01 as stated
above) and you wish to have the late penalty waived, you will need to apply to the appropriate Director
of Undergraduate Studies for your level.
PLEASE NOTE: The office will not discuss and is not empowered to waive late penalties.
EXTENSIONS
Extensions to assessed essay deadlines may be granted only under specific circumstances which are
laid down in the University’s conventions:
Requests for extensions to a published deadline may only be granted in those cases where a student
with appropriately documented medical or compassionate grounds makes the request before the
deadline has passed.
Information about how to apply for an extension is given online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/dus/.
Please note: Retrospective extensions are only granted in extreme circumstances and must be applied
for as soon as possible after the deadline.
For extensions of more than 14 days, the department must request approval from the Chair of the
Undergraduate Studies Committee of the Board of the Faculty of Arts.
PLEASE NOTE
Computer problems are not an acceptable reason for non/late submission of assessed work. ExtraCurricular commitments are not valid reasons for requesting an extension to an assessed essay
deadline.
RETURN OF ESSAYS
The department aims to return essays to students 20 working days after submission. You should arrange
a convenient time with your tutor to collect and gain feedback on your essay.
20
EXAMINATIONS
The examination period starts in week 5 of term 3 and finishes in week 9. The examination timetable is
published at the beginning of term 3. Examination days run from Monday through to Saturday.
Most examinations will be invigilated unseen papers; however a few modules opt for a seen paper.
Details of these will be given to you by the tutor. Seen exam papers will be available 21 days before the
examination. Papers can either be collected from the English Reception during normal opening hours,
or accessed online at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/essay/exams
Rubrics for examinations will be published on the noticeboard in the English Department from week 2
onwards. Please note: You may be penalised up to 20 marks from your overall exam mark if it is evident
that you are in violation of the rubric of the exam paper.
For details of Materials Allowed in Examinations, please refer to the Regulation A, which can be found in
the University’s Senate Examination and Degree Conventions at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/academicoffice/quality/categories/examinations/senateexamanddegr
eeconvs
Past examination papers are available at www2.warwick.ac.uk/go/pastpapers on the University’s
website.
REVISION SESSIONS
Revision sessions are offered for most modules during the Summer Term. Check the module web
pages or with the Module Convenor for details of these sessions.
EXAMINATION FEEDBACK
The department does not return examination scripts to students. However, tutors can provide you with
written feedback if you request it.
THE MARKING OF ESSAYS & EXAMINATIONS
All Honours level essays are sample moderated. This means the marker will choose 25% (at random
across class marks) of the essays they have marked to be passed to a moderator.
All Honours level exams are moderated. This means every exam will have two members of academic
staff looking at your exam and agreeing a mark.
All Honours marks are provisional until they are approved by the Examination Board and may be
subject to change.
17 POINT MARK SCALE
Your work will be marked using the University’s 17 point marking scale.
This scale has 17 mark (or grade) points on it; each of which falls into one of the five classes of
performance which correspond to the overall degree classification. The University uses these classes of
performance for all of its undergraduate modules.
21
Mark Range
Class Performance
70-100
First Class
60-69
Second Class, Upper Division (also referred to as "Upper Second" or "2.1")
50-59
Second Class, Lower Division (also referred to as "Lower Second" or "2.2")
40-49
Third Class
0-39
Fail
The University has generic descriptors for work which is given a mark that falls within the range(s) of
marks in each to the class. So, there is a description for work in the Upper Second class range, another
for work in the Lower Second class range etc.
The mark which each piece of your work will be given is dependent upon the extent to which the work
satisfies the elements in the generic descriptors.
For the purposes of the 17 point mark scale, each of the five classes is further subdivided into the
positions shown in the following table (high 2.1, mid 2.1 etc).
One of the 17 mark points is assigned to each of the subdivisions.
The person marking your work will consider your work alongside the generic criteria to decide which
class of performance the work falls into. The marker will then determine the extent to which your work
meets the criteria in order to arrive at a judgment about the position (high, mid, low) within the class. The
work will be awarded the mark assigned to the relevant position in the class.
If a module has more than one ‘unit’ (or piece) of assessment, (e.g. the assessment comprises two
assessed essays), the mark for each unit is determined using the 17 point mark scale and then the
marks are averaged, taking account of the units’ respective weightings, in order to produce the module
result. This is expressed as a percentage (and therefore may be any number up to 100 and so is not
limited to one of the 17 marks on the scale).
The following table shows each class of degree (including the subdivisions) and the marks assigned to
each position in the class on the 17 point mark scale, alongside the University’s generic descriptors for
work in the class:
22
FIRST CLASS
Class
Mark Point
Generic University Descriptor
Excellent
1st
96
Exceptional command of the subject, including material which ranges well
beyond that covered in lectures/classes. Work of exceptional insight,
bringing new perspectives to bear on the materials, or developing new
knowledge or techniques. Achieves or is close to publishable standard.
89
81
74
Very high quality work, with full understanding of the subject matter. Work
that demonstrates intellectual maturity, and is perceptive with highly
developed organisation. An ambitious project carried out successfully, with
sophisticated handling of primary and secondary material, reasoned,
analytical argument. Some degree of originality, independent research and
thought.
st
High 1
st
Mid 1
Low 1st
SECOND CLASS: DIVISION I (UPPER SECOND)
Class
Mark Point
Generic University Descriptor
High
2.1
Mid 2.1
Low
2.1
68
Highly competent in organisation and presentation, evidence of individual
research; appropriate and intelligent use of primary and secondary material,
good understanding of subject matter allied with perceptive analysis.
65
62
SECOND CLASS: DIVISION II (LOWER SECOND)
Class
Mark Point
Generic University Descriptor
High
2.2
Mid 2.2
Low
2.2
58
Conscientious work, attentive to subject matter and title/task set; a focused
response to the task demonstrating good knowledge, balanced more towards
the descriptive than the analytical. Good knowledge, reasonable
understanding of material and task. Descriptive rather than analytical.
55
52
THIRD CLASS
Class
Mark Point
Generic University Descriptor
High
3rd
Mid 3rd
Low
3rd
48
Some relevant knowledge, some accurate repetition of lecture/class
notes/work. Partial or pedestrian description.
45
42
FAIL CLASS
Class
Mark Point
Generic University Descriptor
High Fail
Near miss
38
Work does not meet standards required for the appropriate stage of an
Honours degree, albeit with some basic understanding of relevant concepts
and techniques.
Fail
Low Fail
25
12
Ineptitude in knowledge, structure, academic/professional practice. Failure or
inability to answer the question/respond to the task. No evidence of basic
understanding of relevant concepts/techniques.
Zero
0
Work of no merit OR absent work not submitted, penalty in some misconduct
cases.
23
SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES
Extenuating or mitigating circumstances are those events which have had a detrimental effect on
your study, to the point that it is in your interest to draw your department’s attention to them and
ask for them to be considered in mitigation of poor performance. Such circumstances include (but
are not limited to) illness, both physical and emotional; the severe illness or death of a close
family member; a shocking or traumatic personal experience. In addition, sudden, unexpected
changes in family circumstances might affect your ability to make academic progress as a
consequence of their demonstrable emotional impact upon you, and may also be considered as
mitigation.
The University is aware that in some cultures it is considered shameful or embarrassing to
disclose the details of these kinds of circumstances to those outside one’s family. This is not the
case in the prevailing UK culture and you should be aware that your department and the
University are fully supportive of students in difficult circumstances and want to assist if at all
possible. If you feel inhibited from talking to a tutor or other member of staff in the first instance,
you may also consider talking to a member of your SSLC, the Students’ Union, the University
Senior Tutor or a Member of Staff in Student Support for initial, informal advice.
Clearly, though, in order for your circumstances to be considered as mitigating by your
department, they must be conveyed formally to someone in your department (a tutor, the Director
of Graduate/Undergraduate Studies, a course/module convenor, for instance). The University
expects that you will discuss your circumstances before Exam Boards meet, so that they may be
taken into account in good time. You should be aware that, in the event you feel you need to
appeal the outcome of an Exam Board, offering extenuating or mitigating circumstances at that
point will need to be accompanied by a good reason why you withheld the information earlier.
Without wanting to invade your privacy, the University does expect that you bring such
circumstances to your department’s attention in a timely manner, despite the discomfort you
might feel in so doing. Failure to disclose such circumstances at a time when you could have
done so may subsequently be problematic. Your department will do all it can to support you in
difficult situations.
Please remember, if you have requested special circumstances and are absent from seminars as
a result of your situation, you still need to email your seminar tutor to let them know you will be
absent to make an excused absent. If you do not, it will be considered an un-excused absence
and will affect your monitoring points.
SPECIFIC LEARNING DIFFICULTIES (SPLD)
If you suffer from any specific learning difficulties, such as dyslexia, it is very important that you
inform your personal tutor and provide supporting documentation for your file. If the department is
not made aware of any difficulties, your tutors cannot take them into consideration when
assessing your work.
Students who wish to discuss their specific circumstances should speak in confidence to the
Director of Undergraduate Studies DUGS, Dr Paul Botley (Year One) or Dr Pablo Mukherjee
(Honours level) or the Senior Tutor, Gill Frith and refer to the disability webpage of the
University’s
website
for
more
details
of
available
support:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors/disability
24
SPECIAL EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS
If you require any special examination arrangements - such as extra time, a scribe, a nonnetworked computer - it is critical that you let your personal tutor and the Undergraduate
Secretary know as soon as possible so that the University’s Examinations Office can make the
necessary arrangements for you.
If you do request any special arrangements you must provide supporting evidence. The deadline
for requesting special examination arrangements through the Exams Office is Friday, Term 2,
Week 10.
SPECIAL CASES COMMITTEE
If a student experiences any extenuating or mitigating circumstances as described above that
may affect their academic work they may present evidence to the Special Cases Committee, via
their personal tutor or the Director of Undergraduate Studies.
The issues raised must be documented (e.g. by medical certificates or reports). The Committee
meets during the Spring and Summer Terms and makes recommendations to the Examinations
Board. We do not require death certificates for bereavements.
If you wish to present a case to the Special Cases Committee, you must complete an application
form (Appendix I, or can be found at:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/undergraduate/current/dus/).
The application form permits your case and supporting evidence to be discussed by the Special
Cases Committee. Under Data Protection legislation any academic committee is prohibited from
discussing a student’s personal details without consent so you must complete and sign the form if
you want your case to be considered by the Committee.
Please note that according to the University’s Examination and Degree Conventions (J10 (c)),
any mitigating circumstances that may have affected a student’s performance in his or her
assessed work should be communicated to the Secretary of the Board of Examiners in advance
of the Board meeting to ensure clarity of information and that a proper record exists and can be
subsequently kept; and that all mitigating evidence – whether coming directly from a student or
from a personal tutor or other member of University staff on behalf of a student – should be
communicated in writing.
By whatever means the information is communicated (i.e. whether directly by the student or by a
member of staff on their behalf), it is ultimately the student’s responsibility to ensure that any
mitigating circumstances are communicated in writing to the Secretary of the relevant Board of
Examiners. In the English Department, this may be effected by the completion of the form
mentioned above.
25
KEY CONTACTS FOR SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES

Director of Undergraduate Studies Year 1:
Dr Paul Botley [email protected] Ext. 23341

Director of Undergraduate Studies Honours Level:
Dr Pablo Mukherjee, [email protected] Ext. 23321

Senior Tutor:
Gill Frith, [email protected], Ext. 23640

Disability Co-ordinator:
Email: [email protected]
Call: Ext. 73734
Visit: www.warwick.ac.uk/services/tutors/disability/

Your Personal Tutor

Undergraduate Secretary:
Mrs Tracie Williams ([email protected]) for administrative queries.
PLEASE NOTE: ALL PERSONAL INFORMATION IS TREATED IN THE STRICTEST CONFIDENCE
26
CHEATING IN A UNIVERSITY TEST
It is critical that every piece of work that you submit is your own work. Cheating in a University test,
which includes assessed essays and dissertations, is not tolerated by either the University or the
department.
If you do cheat your work may be awarded a mark of 0%. Cheating can be defined in a number of
ways. The University’s regulations provide the following definition:
‘In these regulations ‘cheating’ means an attempt to benefit oneself, or another, by
deceit or fraud. This shall include deliberately reproducing the work of another person or
persons without proper acknowledgment.’
Regulation 11, University Calendar
Full details of Regulation11B can be found in Appendix D.
When you submit an assessed essay you must sign the following declaration on the cover sheet:
“I am aware of the Department’s notes on plagiarism and of Regulation 11B in the University
Calendar concerning cheating in a University test. The attached work submitted for a University
test is my own.”
If it is subsequently found that the work is not your own or that you have not accurately
acknowledged any sources, you risk being awarded a mark of 0%.
PLAGIARISM
What is it?
It is a form of cheating. It is the use of another person’s work without acknowledgement. It may
include direct transcriptions of text or the presentation of ideas from a source as your own. You
must always acknowledge your sources, making appropriate use of citation and bibliographies.




Quotations must always be acknowledged with a specific page reference every time they
occur
Direct quotations must be placed in quotation marks
An idea taken from a secondary source must be given a detailed reference
It is not acceptable to just cite a source in the bibliography; if you are using quotations or
ideas from a specific source you must cite the reference accurately
What could happen?
If a tutor suspects plagiarism they will notify the Head of Department. Having examined the work,
the Head of Department may impose a mark of 0%. If this happens, it can have serious
consequences for your work: most essays count for 50% of your module mark.
If you are a second-year or third-year student your case may be considered by a Senate
Disciplinary Committee. If plagiarism is detected in one essay, all other essays may be reexamined for evidence of plagiarism. The University has a range of plagiarism software that can
be used to do this.
27
How to avoid it
Very few students are deliberately dishonest, but poor scholarly practice can lead them to commit
plagiarism. You should always provide appropriate references. Whilst it is important to engage
with other people’s ideas, you must credit their work. Sources that need citing include on-line
sources. If you consult the internet you need to provide the URL and state the date on which you
accessed it.
Advice on good scholarly practice can be found in most books on academic writing. We
recommend Le Pan and Babington, The Broadview Guide to Writing, 3rd edition, which is
available from the University Bookshop. Alternatively, consult:
www.bedfordstmartins.com/online/citex.html.
28
YOUR PROGRESS
As a student, you are responsible for managing your own learning by attending lectures,
seminars, supervisory sessions and regular meetings with your Personal Tutor, by doing the
necessary reading and preparation for classes and by completing assessment tasks on time. The
Department and its’ tutors undertake to design and deliver high quality courses using appropriate
learning and assessment resources and to support you through your learning process so that you
can achieve your full potential.
To help us to gauge how successfully you are engaging with your course, identify any problems
which you may be experiencing and offer support to help you, the department has a number of
check points throughout the year. If you miss any of the points, this might indicate that you are
having problems with the course and need additional support. The check points (or monitoring
points) are set out in the Monitoring Student Attendance and Progression Policy which can be
found at: http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/intranet/undergrad
A summary of the points is provided below:
First Years:
Term 1
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Point 4
Attendance at
departmental
induction
meeting on
Monday of
week 1
Collection of
timetable from
English Office
on Tuesday of
week 1
Initial meeting
with Personal
Tutor by the
end of week 3
Attendance at
seminars in
weeks 2 to 5
inclusive
Point 5
Attendance at
seminars in
weeks 7 to 10
inclusive
Point 6
Submission of
formative work
by the end of
week 10
Term 2
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Point 4
Submission of
assessed essays in
hard copy to the
English Office by
the deadlines
specified in the
online Essay
Deadlines spread
sheet.
Submission of
assessed essays
electronically via
the Tabula system.
Attendance at
seminars in weeks
1 to 5 inclusive.
Attendance at
seminars in weeks
7 to 10 inclusive.
Term 3
Point 1
Point 2
Attendance at end
of year exams.
Submission of
completed options
module form by the
end of week 2
29
Honours Level
Term 1
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Point 4
Point 5
Point 6
Attendance at
departmental
induction
meeting for
returning
students in
Week 1
Module
registration on
eMR by end of
week 3
Meeting with
Personal Tutor
by end of week
3
Attendance at
seminars in
weeks 1 to 5
inclusive
Attendance at
seminars in
weeks 7 to 9
inclusive
Attendance at
seminars in
week 10
inclusive
Term 2
Point 1
Point 2
Point 3
Point 4
Submission of
assessed essays in
hard copy to the
English Office by
the deadlines
specified in the
online Essay
Deadlines spread
sheet.
Submission of
assessed essays
electronically via
the Tabula system.
Attendance at
seminars in weeks
1 to 5 inclusive.
Attendance at
seminars in weeks
7 to 10 inclusive.
Term 3
Point 1
Point 2
Attendance at end
of year exams.
Submission of
completed options
module form - 2nd
years only.
All Students
It is extremely important that you meet the requirements of each point as failure to do so could
result in a letter being sent to you from Student Records reminding you of your obligations as a
student. Please speak to your Personal Tutor if you feel you might be at risk of not meeting these
critical requirements at any point during your University career.
With regard to meetings with your Personal Tutor, please ensure that you take along to the
meeting any written feedback which you have received on both your non-assessed and your
assessed work. This could be a useful starting point for your discussion with your Personal Tutor.
Remember that your Personal Tutor is there to advise and support you in your academic career
at Warwick.
30
YOUR VIEWS
The department and the University give careful consideration to the views of students and there
are a number of ways that you can pass your views on to the academic and administrative staff,
some of which preserve your anonymity.
MODULE EVALUATIONS
Feedback from students contributes to the planning and monitoring of modules. You can make a
direct impact on the way that modules are taught and organised by completing a module
evaluation form. The feedback given by students is discussed by the department. This process
can be completely anonymous, allowing you to be honest and fair in your feedback.
STUDENT-STAFF LIAISON COMMITTEE (SSLC)
The SSLC is organised and chaired by students, but academic staff are members of the
committee. The student chair and secretary are always invited to the department’s staff meeting
to provide a report on the issues that have been discussed. This ensures that all the academic
staff members are aware of the concerns and can discuss ways of addressing these, if it is
appropriate.
At the end of the year, the department’s SSLC writes an annual report which is sent to the
Teaching Quality department of the University where it is considered alongside all the other
reports, so that the University as a whole is informed of the issues that concern our students. The
SSLC will not discuss personal problems nor will it discuss complaints about individual members
of staff. Your SSLC representatives will tell you much more about the SSLC. There is an SSLC
notice board located between rooms H536 and H538 in the English Department. The main
contacts for the SSLC are Anna Laycock ([email protected]) and Sophie Cook
([email protected]).
EDUCATION OFFICER
The Students’ Union Executive includes an Education Officer (Sumaiya Khaku 2013/14), who is a
graduate of the University elected by the student body to represent them on University
committees. It is part of the Education Officer’s role to ensure that the views of students are
shared with academic colleagues on the higher committees. The Education Officer can be
contacted at [email protected]
STUDENT ACADEMIC COMPLAINTS & FEEDBACK PROCEDURE
The University has procedures in place for dealing with student academic complaints and
academic appeals, relating to any aspect of the teaching and learning process. These are
outlined on the University website at the addresses below. However, in the first instance, your
concerns should be raised with your personal tutor, the DUGS, the course convenor or the Head
of Department.
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/gov/complaintsandfeedback
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/aro/academiccomplaints/
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/services/aro/academiccomplaints/studentappeals/
ACADEMIC STAFF
You can also share your views personally with a member of academic staff, your seminar tutor,
and your personal tutor, the Director of Undergraduate Studies or the Head of the Department.
31
Appendix A
LECTURE TIMES 2013/4
Module
Day & Time
Location
EN101 The Epic Tradition
Thurs 12:00-13:00
H052
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature
Tues 12:00-13:00
Woods-Scawen
Thurs 10:00-11:00
Woods-Scawen
Supplementary lecture (not compulsory), will be made
available as a podcast.
Mon 11:00 – 12:00
Lib 1
EN123 Modern World Literatures
Mon 17:00-18:00
IMC002
EN201 The European Novel
Wed 12:00-13:00
L4
EN227 Romantic and Victorian Poetry
Thurs 13:00-14:00
H051
EN228 Seventeenth-Century
Mon 10:00-11:00
H060
EN229 Literature & Cultural Theory
Wed 10:00 – 11:00
SO20
EN251 New Literatures in English
Thurs 14:00-15:00
SO20
EN274 Comparative Perspectives on Arabic Literature
Tue 14:00-15:00
MS05
EN301 Shakespeare & Selected Dramatists of His
Time
Mon 14:00 – 15:00
Wed 12:00-13:00
Woods-Scawen
Woods-Scawen
EN302 European Theatre
Mon 16:00-17:00
MS03
EN122 Modes of Reading
W-S
H
Key to Locations
Woods-Scawen Room in
Warwick Arts Centre
(formerly ACCR)
Humanities Building
IMC
International Manufacturing
Centre
L
Sciences
Lib
MS
Library
Maths and Statistics Building
PS
Physical Sciences
R
Ramphal
S0
Social Studies Building
32
Appendix B
ENGLISH MODULES 2013-2014 AND METHODS OF ASSESSMENT
Module
A
B
C
EN101 The Epic Tradition
A*
B
C*
EN105 Approaches to Reading in English and French
EN107 British Theatre since 1939
B
A
EN121 Medieval to Renaissance English Literature
B
EN122 Modes of Reading
A/A*
EN123 Modern World Literatures
A1/A*
EN124 Modes of Writing: An Introduction
A
EN201 The European Novel
B**
D*
C
EN206 Comparative Literature 1 (German): Romanticism
C
EN213 U.S. Writing and Culture 1780-1920
C
EN223 North American Women Writers
D1/D2
EN226 Drama and Democracy
C
EN227 Romantic and Victorian Poetry
C1
EN228 Seventeenth Century: The first Modern Age of English Literature
C
EN229 Literary and Cultural Theory
C
EN232 Composition and Creative Writing
A
EN236 The Practice of Fiction
A
C
EN238 The Practice of Poetry
A
C
EN240 Screenwriting
A
C
EN245 The English Nineteenth Century Novel
A
C
EN246 Feminist Perspectives on Literature
A
EN248 Modern American Poetry
A
EN251 New Literatures in English
C
C
EN258 The Practice of Life Writing
A
EN261 Introduction to Creative Writing
A
EN263 Devolutionary British Fiction: 1930-present
C
C
EN264 Explorations in Critical Theory
A
C
EN265 The Global Novel
A
C
EN270 Transnational Feminism: Literature, Theory and Practice
C
EN273 Reeling and Writhing
C
EN274 Comparative Perspectives on Arabic Literature
EN277 Asia and the Victorians
th
th
EN278 Endings and Beginnings: Late 19 Century and Early 20 Century
Literature and Culture
D
A
C
A
C
EN301 Shakespeare and Selected Dramatists of his Time
C
EN302 European Theatre
C
EN304 Twentieth Century North American Literature
C
EN320 Dissertation
A
EN323 Othello (15 CATS)
EN328 English Literature & Feminisms 1790-1899
D
D
A
C
33
EN329 Personal Writing Project
A
C
EN330 The Eighteenth Century
A
C
EN331 Poetry in English since 1945
C
EN335 Literature and Psychoanalysis
A
C
EN336 States of Damage
A
C
EN344 Representing Depression: Aesthetics, Insight and Activism
A
EN347 Shakespeare and the Law (15 CATS)
EN348 Twentieth-Century Avant-gardes
C
A
C
EN351 Modern and Contemporary Irish and Scottish Literature
C1
EN352 Restoration Drama (15 CATS)
C
EN353 Early Modern Drama (15 CATS)
C
EN354 What Are Poets For?
A
C
EN355 Ecopoetics
EN356 The Classical Tradition in English Translations: The Renaissance (15
CATS)
th
EN357 The Classical Tradition in English Translations: 18 Century to the
Present (15 CATS)
A
C
A
C
A
C
EN358 Shakespeare, Freud and the Power of Scenes (15 CATS)
A
D
Generic Description of Codes
A = 100% Assessed
B = 100% Examined
C = 50% Assessed/50% Examined
D = Any other Exam: Essay weighting ratio. Please see list below for details.
A*, B*, C*, D* = Assessment method taken at Honours Level only
** = Assessment method available to Philosophy and Literature Degree students only
D assessment method breakdowns per module
EN121
D (at Honours Level) = 40% examined, 60% assessed
EN223
D1 = 20% Assessed/80% Examined
D2 = 70% Assessed/30% Examined
EN274
D = 60% examined, 40% assessed
EN323
D = 60% examined, 40% assessed
EN358
D = 60% examined, 40% assessed
Please see the Work Required listing on the reception hallway notice board for details on word lengths for
essays and examination lengths. This listing is also available online at the address below:
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/
34
Appendix C
Part Year Visiting Student Essay Deadlines – ALL Modules
All essays are due by 12 noon on the deadline day
Please ensure that you submit an electronic copy of the essay using the department's online submission
system and a hard copy of the essay by the deadline.
Term 1 Essay Deadline
Term 2 Essay Deadline
Term 3 Essay Deadline
Tuesday 3rd December 2013
Tuesday 11th March 2014
Tuesday 3rd June 2014
A list of essay deadlines can be found at
http://www2.warwick.ac.uk/fac/arts/english/currentstudents/undergraduate/essay.
35
Appendix D
University of Warwick
Department of English and Comparative Literary Studies
Name: (CAPITALS)
Student ID: ___
Degree and Year:
Personal Tutor:
Are you using this form to: [please tick as applicable]
NOTIFY THE DEPARTMENT OF YOUR SPECIAL CIRCUMSTANCES (if so, complete section A)
REQUEST SPECIAL EXAMINATION ARRANGEMENTS (if so, complete section B)
A. I wish to notify my Department of the following special circumstances, which are likely to affect
my performance in assessed work and / or examination:
B. I wish to apply for Special Examination arrangements for the following medical condition:
_______________________________________________________________________________
I require: (tick as appropriate)
extra time
the use of a computer
to sit examinations in the department (rather than in the main examination rooms)
If applying for exam arrangements, medical documentation is required and must state exactly the
arrangements for which you are applying.
I enclose the following documentation in support of my case:
______
_
_
_______
_____
I give permission for these circumstances to be discussed by the Department’s Special Cases Committee. I
understand that if the Special Cases Committee (which is made up of the Head of Dept, Exams Secretary,
DUGS, UG Secretary, External Examiners) makes a recommendation to the Board of Examinations on the
basis of these discussions, details of my case will not be revealed to the full Board,
Signed:
Date:
36