JULIA CAJAL GROSSI
Email: [email protected]
Phone: +44(0)7821880777
Web: https://sites.google.com/site/juliacajalgrossi/home
UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK
Department of Economics
Placement Officer:
Placement Assistant:
Professor Dan Bernhardt
Mrs. Natalie Deven
+44(0) 2476 523470
+44(0) 2476 573452
[email protected]
[email protected]
Office Contact Details:
S0.52 - Department of Economics
University of Warwick
Coventry, CV4 7AL
United Kingdom
Personal Information: Female. Argentine – Italian Citizenship.
Studies:
2009 – 2015
Ph.D. in Economics, University of Warwick (Completed June 2015)
Thesis title: Buyer – Seller Relationships, Prices and Development.
Supervisors: Prof. Christopher Woodruff; Prof. Gregory Crawford.
Fall 2014/15
Visiting Student - Department of Economics, Penn State University.
2008 – 2009
2007 – 2008
2001 – 2006
MSc. in Economics, University of Warwick; Distinction.
Postgraduate Diploma Advanced Economics, Di Tella University; Overall GPA: A-.
BSc. in Economics, National University of General Sarmiento; Suma Cum Laude.
Research Fields: Development Economics, Applied Microeconometrics, Industrial Organization, International Trade.
Research Papers:
“Searching for Trade Partners in Developing Countries: Testing Firms in the ‘Fast Fashion’ Industry”
(Job Market Paper)
“Firm Performance in a Global Value Chain”
(with R. Macchiavello, G. Noguera and C. Woodruff)
Work in Progress:
“Dynamic Network Formation and Prices: Garments in Bangladesh”
Current Position and Affiliations:
Robert Solow Postdoctoral Fellow 2015-2016, Cournot Centre.
Postdoctoral Fellow, CAGE, Department of Economics, University of Warwick.
Research Experience and Other Employment:
Feb. 2015 – Sept. 2015
Dept. of Economics, University of Warwick, Research Assistant (Prof. Woodruff).
Nov. 2012 – Oct. 2014
Exploratory Research Grant, Private Enterprise Development for Low-Income
Countries, Principal Investigator.
May 2011 – Oct. 2012
Dept. of Economics, University of Warwick, Research Assistant (Prof.
Macchiavello).
Sept. 2009 – Sept. 2013 Dept. of Economics, University of Warwick, Warwick Postgraduate Fellow.
Feb. 2007 – Aug. 2008
Economic Commission for Latin America and the Caribbean (ECLAC – UN),
Consultant.
Honors, Scholarships, and Fellowships:
2015-2016
CAGE Research Grant (Investigator, with C. Woodruff, G. Noguera and R.
Macchiavello).
2015-2016
2014
2012-2014
2009-2013
Robert Solow Postdoctoral Fellow, Cournot Centre.
Visiting Scholar, Department of Economics, Penn State University.
PEDL/CEPR Research Grant (Principal Investigator).
Warwick Postgraduate Fellow (three years), Department of Economics, University
of Warwick.
Chevening Scholar, British Council, Foreign and Commonwealth Office, UK.
2008-2009
Teaching Experience:
2010-2014
2015
2011
2010-2011
Econometrics (UG, Annual), University of Warwick. With Prof. Jeremy Smith.
Statistics (UG, Spring), University of Warwick. With Prof. Jeremy Smith.
Managerial Economics (UG, Spring), University of Warwick. With Prof. Ben
Knight.
Economics for Business (UG, Fall), University of Warwick. With Dr. Peter Backus.
Software and Programming: Matlab, Stata, Latex.
References:
Professor Chris Woodruff
University of Warwick
+44(0)247615 1096
[email protected]
Professor Greg Crawford
University of Zurich
+41 44634 5528
[email protected]
Dr. Guillermo Noguera
University of Warwick
+44(0)247615 0047
[email protected]
Abstracts:
“Searching for Trade Partners in Developing Countries: Testing Firms in the ‘Fast Fashion’ Industry”
(Job Market Paper)
(Latest Version: https://sites.google.com/site/juliacajalgrossi/home/research/JMP_CajalGrossi.pdf )
ABSTRACT: An integral part of global supply chains is the selection by international buyers of trading partners in
developing countries. However, our understanding of how buyers find a suitable long term supplier is limited. I use
unique buyer-seller customs data to directly observe experimentation activity in a large market - the “fast fashion”
industry in Bangladesh. I study how buyers of ready-made garments conduct trials of suppliers at the order-product
level before settling into sustained sourcing relationships. To illustrate this process, I use a model of idiosyncratic
search costs where the buyer's costs of testing a manufacturer are determined by the heterogeneity of potential
suppliers. The model shows that (1) higher supplier heterogeneity is associated with lower experimentation, (2) as
heterogeneity increases, search activity falls more markedly for larger buyers than for their smaller counterparts, and (3)
while buyer-seller matches are positively assortative, more heterogeneous settings see all buyers -and more markedly,
large buyers- willing to accept relationships with (weakly) worse suppliers. These implications are strongly supported
by the data, and hold in terms of within-buyer, cross-market differences in experimentation behavior. Finally, I show
that these information frictions, rooted in supplier heterogeneity, matter for the distribution of rents in these
relationships: price-cost margins for suppliers are positively related to the degree of heterogeneity in the environment.
“Firm Performance in a Global Value Chain”
(with R. Macchiavello, G. Noguera and C. Woodruff)
ABSTRACT: We study the determinants of performance differences across firms engaged in the manufacturing stage
of production in a global value chain. We follow a production-based approach that uses the panel structure of the
Bangladesh's apparel sector customs data to identify unknown output elasticities without making assumptions on
demand or market structures while addressing well-documented simultaneity, selection, and other biases. We combine
these estimates with observed input expenditure shares in total revenue and calculate markups at the order level. We
first analyze how prices, markups, marginal costs, and the degree of pass-through relate to seller, buyer, buyer- seller,
and product characteristics. We then study how the gains from trade are distributed between large international buyers,
like Wal-Mart and H&M, and small export-oriented Bangladeshi producers, and explore the factors that determine the
share of rents captured by local producers. In particular, we focus on the effect of relative bargaining power between
buyers and sellers, age of their relationships, and the heterogeneous response to exogenous (to the firms) shocks
including trade policy and bilateral exchange rate changes.
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JULIA CAJAL GROSSI UNIVERSITY OF WARWICK Department of Economics