Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 3: Geometry and Spatial Reasoning
Question 1
6.6A (Supporting) The student is expected to use angle measurements to classify angles as acute, obtuse, or right
Dual Coding: 6.11B The student is expected to use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the
problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness;
Vocabulary:
Angle, characteristics, obtuse
When Taught?
Content: 6.6A
Process: 6.11B
Cognitive Level:
Understand – students have to choose
the angle that can be classified as obtuse
and greater than 88.5
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data
Answer
Data
*A/F
85%
Correct
B/G
6%
Greater than 88.5 but not obtuse
C/H
5%
Greater than 88.5 but not obtuse
D/J
3%
Not greater than 88.5 or obtuse
Instructional Implications:
Students in Region 10 were successful for the most part on this question. Students need to be able to classify angles
with more than one characteristic. Vocabulary is important (obtuse, acute right). Giving students characteristics and
having them write (or show with their hands, arms or bodies) is a great open-ended exercise. Also giving students
an angle and having them list and discuss characteristics as a group is also important.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 2
6.1C (Supporting) The student is expected to use integers to represent real-life situations
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models; and
Vocabulary:
Represented, additional, shortens, divides
When Taught?
Content: 6.1C
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
5%
11%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students must apply their
knowledge of the addition, subtraction,
multiplication and division of integers to
real world scenarios
Analysis of Distracters
The multiplication of 14 would represent this situation.
Dividing the players into teams would mean the original
number would decrease so students might have confused
division with subtraction.
The addition of 14 would represent this situation.
Correct answer
C/H
8%
*D/J
76%
Instructional Implications:
Ensure that all students understand the vocabulary in problems like these, by using the vocabulary in class and
expecting students to use the vocabulary in their verbal and written responses. Use a word wall and provide
students with strategies to work with unfamiliar terminology. Provide students an expression or part of an
expression and have them to create multiple different scenarios to see and understand that many “key words”
could be used.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 5: Probability and Statistics
Question 3
6.9A (Supporting) The student is expected to construct sample spaces using lists and tree diagrams
Dual Coding: 6.11C The student is expected to select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from a
variety of different types, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking,
acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem
Vocabulary:
Possible outcomes
When Taught?
Content: 6.2C
Process: 6.11C
Correct
Answer
Regional
Data
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – students must apply their
understanding of sample space to
construct a list or tree diagram
Analysis of Distracters
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
A/F
11%
B/G
*C/H
D/J
7%
80%
3%
If the student found that there were 6 options, they might
have chosen this option, but this option assumes Monday
morning twice, and includes options that were not
available (Tuesday afternoon and Wednesday evening)
This option is missing Monday afternoon.
Correct
This option is missing Monday afternoon and Thursday
evening. It also includes an option that was not available
(Thursday afternoon)
Instructional Implications:
Students should have opportunities to experiment with different situations to construct sample spaces. Use real
scenarios that students can relate to and have them create a sample space of all possibilities with lists and tree
diagrams. Teach students how to create a list from their tree diagram. Expose students to different visual
representations.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Numbers, Operations and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 4
6.2C (Readiness) The student is expected to use multiplication and division of whole numbers to solve problems
including situations involving equivalent ratios and rates
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Same number in each
When Taught?
Content: 6.2C
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
C/H
Regional
Data
85%
5%
4%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students must apply their
understanding of multiplication, division,
ratios and rates to a real world problem
and solve it correctly.
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Subtracted 3 (the difference between 5 and 8) from 176
Didn’t carry the 1 when multiplying 22 (the unit rate slices per loaf) by 5 loaves
Added 8 loaves and 5 loaves then subtracted from 176
D/J
6%
Instructional Implications:
Students in Region 10 were successful for the most part on this question. Students should be taught to label their
rates, ratios and proportions with accompanying units. They should be asked to justify their set up.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 2: Patterns, Relationships and Algebraic Thinking
Question 5
6.4B (Supporting) The student is expected to use tables of data to generate formulas representing relationships
involving perimeter, area, volume of a rectangular prism, etc
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Rectangular Prism, volume, height, length, width, relationship, equation
When Taught?
Content: 6.4B
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
A/F
B/G
*C/H
D/J
Regional
Data
7%
18%
72%
2%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analyze – Students are expected to
analyze the measurements in the table,
use the formula for volume of a prism
and generate a formula
Analysis of Distracters
Adding length and width instead of multiplying.
Multiplying both sides by 2
Correct
Adding 2 to both sides
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to work with the reference materials to create tables and graphs given
dimensions of shapes. Assist them in understanding the context of the problem by providing visual representations
or having students create visual representations. Students need to be able to manipulate the equation given length,
width, height, volume or a combination.
Students need to work both ways with rules and tables. Given a table, find the rule and given a rule, find a table.
Provide opportunities for students to read and interpret information from tables. Provide opportunities for students
to build input-output tables and explain the relationships in terms of input-output. Explaining the relationship in
terms of input-output is crucial – have them use the words given in their explanation “the volume (128) divided by
height (2) will equal length times width”.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Numbers, Operations and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 6
6.2E (Readiness) The student is expected to use order of operations to simplify whole number expressions (without
exponents) in problem solving situations
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics;
Vocabulary:
Borrowed, another, equal payments, the rest, repaid, expression
When Taught?
Content: 6.2E
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
8%
*B/G
C/H
86%
3%
D/J
2%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – students are applying their
understanding of order of operations to
this situation
Analysis of Distracters
Did not do (12+16) first. Instead took 92-12 then added 16
and divided the sum by 4
Correct
Divided 92 by 4 first, then subtracted the sum of 12 and 16
(which would be -5)
Divided 92 by 4 first, then subtracted 12 then added 16
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Students need to be exposed to all ways of representing multiplication and division. Always incorporate situations
where subtraction comes before addition and division comes before multiplication (to address the common
misconception that you always solve in the order PEMDAS). Also students need to see all types of “groups” –
parenthesis, brackets, and in this case the expression 92-(12+16) above the division (fraction) symbol.
Giving students a number as the solution, a set of numbers (to use in the expression), a set of parenthesis and
instructing them to create a situation is a great problem solving activity for students to increase their conceptual
understanding of the effect parenthesis have in different parts of the expression.
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 5: Probability and Statistics
Question 7
6.10D (Readiness) The student is expected to solve problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting
data
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Graph, statement
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
When Taught?
Content: 6.10D
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
18%
B/G
11%
C/H
11%
*D/J
59%
Instructional Implications:
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analyze – Students are expected to
analyze the data presented in the graph
and determine which statements are true
or false.
Analysis of Distracters
The graph shows the dry cleaner to be open for 12.5 hours,
but this answer would be 12 hours
The graph shows the restaurant to be open for 10 hours,
but this answer would be 9 hr and 45 min
The graph shows the post office as open for 8.5 hours, but
this answer would be 9 hrs
Correct
Provide students with information in graphs and tables and have them practice drawing conclusions. Have students
justify their conclusions and evaluate other student conclusions. Provide students with words or sentence stems to
use in their conclusions (such as twice, half, the sum of ____ and ____ is greater than _____), so they have practice
with that vocabulary and practice with conclusions that are multi-step. Have students label information directly on
the table. Use tables and graphs from print or electronic media using contexts students find interesting.
Students have seen bar graphs since early elementary school, so always incorporate multiple steps to analyze the
information in bar graphs particularly (As in this question where students have to turn number of hours into a start
and end time).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 3: Geometry and Spatial Reasoning
Question 8
6.6C(Readiness) The student is expected to describe the relationship between radius, diameter, and circumference of
a circle
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Drilled, circular, diameter, equation, radius
When Taught?
Content: 6.6C
Process: 6.12A
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students apply their
understanding of the relationship
between parts of a circle, to choose the
appropriate equation
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data
Answer
Data
A/F
24%
Would solve for diameter (not r)
*B/G
50%
Correct
C/H
9%
Confuses elements of a circle
D/J
17%
Used the formula for circumference, given a radius
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to know and understand the relationships that exist between the radius,
diameter and circumference. They should calculate: circumference with radius, circumference with diameter,
diameter with circumference, radius with circumference, diameter with radius, and radius with diameter. Have
students explain what the components of various equations mean in relationship to finding the diameter, radius or
circumference. Provide opportunities for students to know and understand the formulas used for circumference,
diameter, and radius and manipulate these formulas.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 4: Measurement
Question 9
6.8D (Supporting) The student is expected to convert measures within the same measurement system (customary
and metric) based on relationships between units
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
How many
When Taught?
Content: 6.8D
Process: 6.11A
Cognitive Level:
Understand - Students understand the
relationship between units, understand
the use of the reference materials and
are able to use multiplication and division
to convert gallons to cups
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data
Answer
Data
*A/F
72%
Correct
B/G
12%
Converts to quarts
C/H
3%
Converts to ounces
D/J
13%
Converts to pints
Instructional Implications:
Provide student with plenty of opportunity to understand the measurement information on the reference materials
and to use it as a tool to answer questions. Provide opportunities for students to think aloud and talk through the
decisions they make and the steps they take to solve. Show students that this can be solved using a proportion and
always have them label their units. Have real world examples displayed in your classroom to represent 1 gallon, 1
quart, 1 pint and 1 cup and reference them while teaching to build students’ conceptual understanding of the size
and conversion of each.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 2: Patterns, Relationships and Algebraic Thinking
Question 10
6.4A (Readiness) The student is expected to use tables and symbols to represent and describe proportional and other
relationships such as those involving conversions, arithmetic sequences (with a constant rate of change), perimeter
and area
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Value, determined, expression, represents, relationship
When Taught?
Content: 6.4A
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
16%
*B/G
C/H
55%
17%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Applying - Students must apply their
understanding of additive patterns to
create a table or find the matching table.
Analysis of Distracters
The difference between r values is 9/8 so the student
might mistake that they should be looking for the
relationship between g and r, the expression would be r –
1/8
Correct
r + 9/8
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
D/J
12%
The difference between r values is 9/8 so the student
might mistake that they should be looking for the
relationship between g and r, the expression would be r +
1/8
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to write an equation, test the equations validity and understand the context of
the problem. Students need to work both ways with rules and tables. Given a table, find the rule and given a rule,
find a table. Provide opportunities for students to read and interpret information from tables. Provide opportunities
for students to build input-output tables and explain the relationships in terms of input-output. Explaining the
relationship in terms of input-output is crucial – in this question a common misconception was that students found
a relationship between r and r rather than what the question asked; the relationship between r and g. Students
need to be exposed to fractions and decimals within the table and expression (not just integers).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Numbers, Operations and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 11
6.2B (Readiness) The student is expected to use addition and subtraction to solve problems involving fractions and
decimals
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Another, fraction
When Taught?
Content: 6.2B
Process: 6.11A
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students must determine the
fraction of the pizza leftover. They must
also apply their knowledge of converting
percent to fraction to subtract.
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data
Answer
Data
A/F
4%
Convert 25% incorrectly, and subtract incorrectly
*B/G
64%
Correct
C/H
13%
Convert percent to fraction only 25% = ¼
D/J
19%
This is the amount Ryan HAS eaten
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to work multi-step problems, especially with fractions, decimals and percent.
Teach students to write number sentences or equations before performing the operation in a word problem. Have
students use a problem solving strategy such as draw a picture, work a simpler problem (re-read it with simple
numbers to better understand the context and write a number sentence), or act it out. Consider choosing a problem
solving system as a campus to use across grade levels. Practice consistently with benchmark fractions (such as 25%,
20%, 50%, 10% etc) so that students can convert them quickly and easily when embedded in a word problem.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 2: Patterns, Relationships and Algebraic Thinking
Question 12
6.5A (Readiness) The student is expected to formulate equations from problem situations described by linear
relationships
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Weight, times, half, equation, combined
When Taught?
Content: 6.5A
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
6%
22%
*C/H
D/J
68%
4%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Evaluate – Students must analyze and
compare symbolic equations to a verbal
description and then determine which
equation is equivalent to the verbal
description.
Analysis of Distracters
Adding w+8 instead of multiplying
Added both 8 and ½ to w (weight) – students may have
been distracted by the word “combined”
Correct
Confuses the value for food with the value for water
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
This question required students to write equations from a verbal description. In order to prepare students for
problems like this one, expose students to multiple solution approaches. Teach students how to justify their
thinking and communicate their reasoning. Encourage students to think of “another way” to solve problems. Have
them practice evaluating one another’s approaches. Emphasize the meaning of given variables.
To accommodate struggling or English language learners, have them annotate directly in the verbal description their
“math translation” for instance above “8 times weight” students would annotate “8xw”.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 5: Probability and Statistics
Question 13
6.10B (Supporting) The student is expected to identify mean (using concrete objects and pictorial models), median,
mode, and range of a set of data
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Median
When Taught?
Content: 6.10B
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
74%
8%
C/H
6%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Understand – Students must understand
how to find the median given a set of
numbers.
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Found the number in the middle of this set without
ordering the set from least to greatest
Incorrect addition and division of 2 middle numbers 15 and
19
This is the mode
D/J
12%
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to communicate their thinking and specifically to put “median” in their own
words, not just “the middle”. Students should given the opportunity to explain why you need to put the data in
order to determine the median. Expose students to sets of data with an even number in the set.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 4: Measurement
Question 14
6.8B (Readiness) The student is expected to select and use appropriate units, tools, or formulas to measure and to
solve problems involving length (including perimeter), area, time, temperature, volume, and weight
Dual Coding: 6.11D The student is expected to select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil, and
technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems
Vocabulary:
Measure, closest, nearest, combined, area, figure, square centimeters
When Taught?
Content: 6.8B
Process: 6.11D
Correct
Answer
A/F
B/G
*C/H
D/J
Regional
Data
10%
8%
62%
20%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students must apply their
knowledge of the ruler to correctly
measure the dimensions (length, width,
base and height), they must apply their
knowledge of area
Analysis of Distracters
Did not round to the nearest ¼ inch
Did not divide by 2 for the area of the triangle
Correct
Combined perimeter
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide many opportunities for students to use the ruler on the reference materials to measure irregular and
regular figures. Emphasize the correct height of the triangle and why. Have students communicate the
measurements, dimensions of shapes, and use of the formulas. Provide students with creative problems or have
them create problems for other students to solve. Post the problems and solutions and have students critique the
problems and solutions provided.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation, and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 15
6.2C (Readiness) The student is expected to use multiplication and division of whole numbers to solve problems
including situations involving equivalent ratios and rates
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Total, intersection, how many
When Taught?
Content: 6.2C
Process: 6.11A
Cognitive Level:
Applying – Students must read the
problem, and apply their understanding
of ratios and rates to solve for the
missing value
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data Analysis of Distracters
Answer
Data
A/F
8%
36 divided by 16
*B/G
68%
Correct
C/H
8%
36 – 16 + 4
D/J
16%
36 + 16 divided by 4
Instructional Implications:
Have students estimate before performing the operation to check for reasonableness. If using a proportion to solve,
have students always label their units, explain their set-up and justify their reasoning. Provide many opportunities
for students to work multi-step problems with proportions and rates. Provide students with many different verbal
scenarios for practice.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 5: Probability and Statistics
Question 16
6.10D (Readiness) The student is expected to solve problems by collecting, organizing, displaying, and interpreting
data
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Collected, total, amounts, represented, line plot
When Taught?
Content: 6.10D
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
54%
46%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analysis – students must interpret the
data presented in the line plot and
problem solve given the information
provided
Analysis of Distracters
40, Correct
Did not accurately interpret the data, did not use the
appropriate operations to solve, or did not compute
correctly.
C/H
0%
D/J
0%
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to read and interpret tables. Have students think aloud and talk though the
decisions they make and the steps they may take to solve. Make sure that students are provided a verbal
description as well as the data in tables and graphs working problems. Expose students to multi-step problems
where students not only have to interpret the graph, but use the information to answer a question or solve a
problem. Make sure students practice using the griddable (especially when the answer is a whole number).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 3: Geometry and Spatial Reasoning
Question 17
6.6B (Supporting) The student is expected to identify relationships involving angles in triangles and quadrilaterals
Dual Coding:
Vocabulary:
Polygon
When Taught?
Content: 6.6B
Process:
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
10%
B/G
12%
C/H
6%
*D/J
71%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Understand – Students must understand
the relationship between angles in a
quadrilateral
Analysis of Distracters
Used the sum of the angle measures in a triangle (180)
rather than a quadrilateral to subtract the angle 164 ->
180-164=16
Used the sum of the angle measures in a triangle (180)
rather than a quadrilateral to subtract the angle 147 ->
180-147=23
Used the sum of the angle measures in a triangle (180)
rather than a quadrilateral to subtract the angle 147 and
did not borrow when subtracting
Correct
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide students opportunities to measure angles within quadrilaterals using a protractor. A great introduction
through inquiry or discovery is to teach students to measure with a protractor, have them measure the angles and
find the sum of the angles in multiple different quadrilaterals and then draw their own conclusions about the
relationship with their peers (with triangles as well). Another activity to have students draw their own conclusions is
to “challenge” them to draw a quadrilateral with 3 acute angles or 3 obtuse angles (which they will find is not
possible). Have them justify in their own words why angles in a quadrilateral have a sum of 360. Use Always/
Sometimes/ Never statements to have students think critically about angle relationships in quadrilaterals (and
triangles).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 2: Patterns, Relationships and Algebraic Thinking
Question 18
6.3C (Readiness) The student is expected to use ratios to make predictions in proportional situations
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
(at this) Rate
When Taught?
Content: 6.3C
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
A/F
*B/G
C/H
Regional
Data
17%
67%
13%
D/J
3%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Understand – students understand how
to use a rate to make a prediction in this
proportional situation
Analysis of Distracters
Incorrectly divided 460 by 3 which is approximately 153
Correct
Round or divide incorrectly to find the unit rate of 40 per
hour
460/3 + 12 = 165 poor procedural understanding and
conceptual understanding of proportions
Instructional Implications:
When students set up a proportion, teach them to always label their units and have students think aloud and talk
through how they set up a proportion using rates and ratios. Have students estimate first to check for
reasonableness (and eliminate unreasonable answers in multiple choice questions). Teach students that ratios have
a part to whole relationship just like fractions and can therefore be treated just like fractions (can be simplified, can
find equivalent ratios just like you would for equivalent fractions, etc).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 4: Measurement
Question 19
6.8A (Supporting) The student is expected to estimate measurements (including circumference) and evaluate
reasonableness of results
Dual Coding: 6.11B The student is expected to use a problem-solving model that incorporates understanding the
problem, making a plan, carrying out the plan, and evaluating the solution for reasonableness
Vocabulary:
Cylindrical, diameter, best estimate, circumference
When Taught?
Content: 6.8A
Process: 6.11B
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
20%
B/G
18%
*C/H
55%
D/J
7%
Instructional Implications:
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply –Students must the formula to
estimate the circumference of the shape.
They also must convert inches to ft.
Analysis of Distracters
Used the formula C=2(pi)r and misunderstood 20 as the
radius instead of diameter
Estimate diameter as 20 in. then converted to ft and round
down to 2ft. (does not find circumference or use the
formula)
Correct
12in=1ft.
Students need to see images of real world shapes. Students also need to understand which formula to use and how
to calculate an estimate using 3 for pi. This can be accomplished by providing students with real world images and
problem situations. Students should use a problem solving method, and especially when working with a shape and
not given a picture, students should be taught to draw and label the picture. Provide opportunities for students to
think aloud and explain the decisions they make and the steps they took to solve a problem with their peers.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 2: Patterns, Relationships and Algebraic Thinking
Question 20
6.4A (Readiness) The student is expected to use tables and symbols to represent and describe proportional and other
relationships such as those involving conversions, arithmetic sequences (with a constant rate of change), perimeter
and area
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
Share equally, table, relationship
When Taught?
Content: 6.4A
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
69%
7%
C/H
12%
D/J
12%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Applying - Students must apply their
understanding of multiplicative patterns
to create a table or find the matching
table.
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Takes 180 pieces minus the number of people, to get the
number of pieces. P=180-n
Takes 180 pieces times n, the number of people to get p
the number of pieces. P=180n
Takes 180 pieces divided by n, the number of people,
minus 2
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to write an equation, test the equation’s validity and understand the context of
the problem. Students need to work both ways with rules and tables. Given a table, find the rule and given a rule,
find a table. Provide opportunities for students to read and interpret information from tables. Provide opportunities
for students to build input-output tables and explain the relationships in terms of input-output. Have students use
a verbal description using the words given to describe the relationship to check for reasonableness. For instance
“180 pieces of gum minus the number of people” is not a reasonable situation, but “180 pieces of gum divided by
the number of people” is. Provide opportunities for students to justify why a given table is not appropriate for the
given expression.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 5: Probability and Statistics
Question 21
6.10C (Supporting) The student is expected to sketch circle graphs to display data
Dual Coding: 6.12A The student is expected to communicate mathematical ideas using language, efficient tools,
appropriate units, and graphical, numerical, physical, or algebraic mathematical models
Vocabulary:
The rest, ratio, circle graph, best represents
When Taught?
Content: 6.10C
Process: 6.12A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
56%
11%
C/H
28%
D/J
5%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analyze – Students must analyze the
circle graph to determine which one
correctly represents the verbal
description
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Confused the ratio 3 to 2 as tables to chairs instead of
chairs to tables
Has an equal number of tables and chairs instead of using
the ratio 3 to 2
Assumes 20/80 benches and 10/80 desks
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Students need to work from verbal description to the circle graph and also from information given in a list or table
to a circle graph. Emphasize the importance of finding the total since circle graphs show a part to whole
relationship. Provide opportunities for student to think aloud and talk through the decisions they make and the
steps they take to solve. With circle graphs, encourage them to communicate their reasoning with and without
using specific percentages for parts of the graph – for instance “I knew there would be more chairs than tables
because of the ratio 3 to 2” or “the part representing desks would have to be less than half the circle, because
20/80 is less than half of 80” to increase their problem solving and reasoning skills.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 22
6.1B (Readiness) The student is expected to generate equivalent forms of rational numbers including whole numbers,
fractions, and decimals
Dual Coding:
Vocabulary:
Length, fraction, equivalent
When Taught?
Content: 6.1B
Process:
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students apply their
understanding of equivalent fractions,
whole numbers, and decimals.
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Regional
Campus/ District Data
Answer
Data
A/F
15%
84/10 is not equivalent to eighty four hundredths
B/G
3%
92/500 = 0.184
*C/H
52%
Correct
D/J
30%
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunity for students to represent numbers in different ways but always understand that their values
don’t change. Provide opportunities for students to correctly read and write numbers to help them learn place
value. Emphasize and expect the formal vocabulary when naming numbers. Don’t say or allow students to say “one
point eight four”, read “one and eighty four hundredths” – with fractions as well, don’t accept “92 over 500”, hold
out for “92 hundredths”. Have a place value chart in your classroom to reference when asking students to selfcorrect using the formal vocabulary.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 4: Measurement
Question 23
6.8B (Readiness) The student is expected to select and use appropriate units, tools, or formulas to measure and to
solve problems involving length (including perimeter), area, time, temperature, volume, and weight
Dual Coding: 6.11C The student is expected to select or develop an appropriate problem-solving strategy from a
variety of different types, including drawing a picture, looking for a pattern, systematic guessing and checking,
acting it out, making a table, working a simpler problem, or working backwards to solve a problem
Vocabulary:
Weighed, combined, ratio, closest
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
When Taught?
Content: 6.8B
Process: 6.11C
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
22%
B/G
17%
C/H
11%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – Students must apply their
understanding of ratios to estimate the
value of box A
Analysis of Distracters
Subtracted the numbers given in the ratio 3-1=2, then
subtracted that from the combined weight 128-2=126
128 divided by 3 = 42 and 2/3
Both 128 and 3 are found in the problem
Combined weight of the ratio 3:1 = 4, then 128 divided by
4 = 32 (did not multiply the 32 by 3)
Correct
*D/J
49%
Instructional Implications:
When students set up a proportion, teach them to always label their units and have students think aloud and talk
through how they set up a proportion using rates and ratios. Have students estimate first to check for
reasonableness (and eliminate unreasonable answers in multiple choice questions). Teach students to find the
whole when given a ratio that is part to part and emphasize the importance of the whole. Provide students
information embedded in images, and diagrams as well as graphs and table.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 24
6.2E (Readiness) The student is expected to use order of operations to simplify whole number expressions (without
exponents) in problem solving situations
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Decreased, another, expression, determine
When Taught?
Content: 6.2E
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
C/H
D/J
Regional
Data
65%
9%
16%
11%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply – students are applying their
understanding of order of operations to
this situation
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
90-2(60 / (10-4))
90-2((60 / 10) - 4)
Incorrect computation of the multiplication, division or
subtraction
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Students need to be exposed to all ways of representing multiplication and division for example 2(6) and 4/5.
Provide opportunities for students to work multi-step problems using order of operations. Have students
communicate their thinking and explain why certain operations must be performed first.
Giving students a number as the solution, a set of numbers (to use in the expression), a set of parenthesis and
instructing them to create a situation is a great problem solving activity for students to increase their conceptual
understanding of the effect parenthesis have in different parts of the expression.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 25
6.1B (Readiness) The student is expected to generate equivalent forms of rational numbers including whole numbers,
fractions, and decimals
Dual Coding: 6.13A The student is expected to make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples
Vocabulary:
Sets, statement, equivalent, each
When Taught?
Content: 6.1B
Process: 6.13A
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
39%
*B/G
C/H
38%
16%
D/J
6%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analysis – Students must apply their
understanding of equivalent forms of
rational numbers to compare the sets
and analyze the statements provided for
accuracy.
Analysis of Distracters
Able to accurately solve for equivalence when given a
mixed number, but not with the improper fractions.
Correct
Mistakes seven tenths in the fraction form for seven
hundredths in decimal form and incorrectly converts
improper fractions
Mistakes seven tenths in the fraction form for seven
hundredths in decimal form
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunity for students to represent numbers in different ways but always understand that their values
don’t change. Provide opportunities for students to correctly read and write numbers to help them learn place
value. Emphasize and expect the formal vocabulary when naming numbers. Don’t say or allow students to say
“eight point seven”, read “eight and seven tenths” – with fractions as well, don’t accept “92 over 500”, hold out for
“92 hundredths”. Have a place value chart in your classroom to reference when asking students to self-correct using
the formal vocabulary.
6.13A The student is expected to make conjectures from patterns or sets of examples and nonexamples
Students need to be exposed to this process skill with more than just equivalent fractions. They should be able to
group types of numbers and identify non-examples. Provide opportunities for this and for students to think aloud
and talk through the decisions they make.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 3: Geometry and Spatial Reasoning
Question 26
6.6C (Readiness) The student is expected to describe the relationship between radius, diameter, and circumference of
a circle
Dual Coding: 6.11D The student is expected to select tools such as real objects, manipulatives, paper/pencil, and
technology or techniques such as mental math, estimation, and number sense to solve problems
Vocabulary:
Line segment, passes through, center, circle, coordinate grid, equation, circumference
When Taught?
Content: 6.6C
Process: 6.11D
Correct
Answer
*A/F
B/G
Regional
Data
65%
26%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Apply - Students must use the
information provided in the coordinate
grid and apply the formula for
circumference of a circle
Analysis of Distracters
Correct
Uses the formula for circumference given the radius, but
incorrectly inputs the value for diameter (60).
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
C/H
5%
60x2=120, and uses the formula that would solve for
radius, not circumference
60/2 would solve for radius, not circumference
D/J
4%
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to know and understand the relationships that exist between the radius,
diameter and circumference. They should calculate: circumference with radius, circumference with diameter,
diameter with circumference, radius with circumference, diameter with radius, and radius with diameter. Have
students explain what the components of various equations mean in relationship to finding the diameter, radius or
circumference. Provide opportunities for students to know and understand the formulas used for circumference
and manipulate these formulas.
When using coordinate grids, have students find the distance between two points. Use a variety of increments so
they have the experience and exposure working with various values in coordinate grids.
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
2014 Grade 6 Mathematics STAAR
Reporting Category 1: Number, Operation and Quantitative Reasoning
Question 27
6.2B (Readiness) The student is expected to use addition and subtraction to solve problems involving fractions and
decimals
Dual Coding: 6.11A The student is expected to identify and apply mathematics to everyday experiences, to
activities in and outside of school, with other disciplines, and with other mathematical topics
Vocabulary:
Spent, preparing, conducting, the rest, statement, more than, same amount
When Taught?
Content: 6.2B
Process: 6.11A
Correct
Answer
A/F
Regional
Data
15%
B/G
C/H
14%
17%
*D/J
54%
Campus/ District Data
Cognitive Level:
Analysis – Students must use addition
and subtraction of fractions (including
regrouping) to solve this multistep
problem and determine which statement
is accurate.
Analysis of Distracters
Cannot be correct because 2 1/3 – (5/6 + ¾) is less than 1
½
Cannot be correct because 2/3 < ¾
Cannot be correct because 5/6 + 5/6 + ¾ is 2 5/12 not 2
1/3
Correct
Region 10 Item Analysis – 2014 6th Grade Math STAAR, Part 1
Instructional Implications:
Provide opportunities for students to work multi-step problems, especially with fractions, decimals and percent.
Teach students to write number sentences or equations before performing the operation in a word problem. Have
students use a problem solving strategy such as draw a picture, work a simpler problem (re-read it with simple
numbers to better understand the context and write a number sentence), or act it out. Students need to be
comfortable with reading long questions, identifying multiple informational elements within the question, plan and
carry out a solution. Consider choosing a problem solving system as a campus to use across grade levels. Have
students communicate their thinking.

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